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Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board"

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Public Document 



No. 57 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPOKT 



OF THE 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND 
SEWERAGE BOARD. 



For the Year 1915. 




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BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

32 DERNE STREET. 

1916. 



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Approved by 
TheJState Board of Publication. 





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CONTENTS. 



I. Organization and Administration, 
Board, Officers and Employees, 
II. Metropolitan Water District, 
III.. Metropolitan Water Works — Construction 
IV. Water Works — Maintenance, . 

(1) Storage Reservoirs, 

(2) Aqueducts, .... 

(3) Pumping Stations, . 

(4) Protection of the Water Supply, 

(5) Clinton Sewerage Works, 

(6) Forestry, .... 

(7) Wachusett Power Plant, . 

(8) Rainfall and Water Supply, 

(9) Water Consumption, 
V. Water Works — Financial Statement, 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 



District and to Water 



Act 



(2) 

(3) 
(4) 



Water Loans — Receipts and Payments, . 

Total Water Debt, December 31, 1915, 

Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 

Water Assessment, 1915, 

Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of 

Expenditures for the Different Works, 

Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

(6) Receipts, .... 

(c) Assets, ..... 

(d) Liabilities, .... 
VI. Metropolitan Sewerage Works, 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 
North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, . ... 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 
South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, .... 

VII. Sewerage Works — Financial Statement, .... 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments, 

North Metropolitan System, .... 

South Metropolitan System, .... 

Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1915, 

North Metropolitan System, .... 

South Metropolitan System, .... 

North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, December 31 
Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures, 
Sewer Assessments, 1915, 
Expenditures for the Different Works, 
Detailed Financial Statement, . 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

(6) Receipts, .... 

(c) Assets, ..... 

(d) Liabilities, .... 
VIII. Recommendations for Legislation, 



(2) 



(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 



Companies 



1915, 



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IV 



CONTENTS. 



2, Ashland, Hopkinton 



Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works, . 
Organization, ..... 
Construction, ..... 

Water Pipe Tunnel under Chelsea Creek, 
Additional 24-inch Main from Dorchester Lower Mills to Quincy 
Extension of 20-inch Force Main in West Roxbury, 
Bellevue Reservoir, ..... 

Extension of 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main in Newton, 
Sudbury Power Plant, . 
Engineering, .... 

Maintenance, ..... 
Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds, . 
Storage Reservoirs, 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, . 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 
voirs, 

Farm Pond, 

Lake Cochituate, 

Dudley Pond, 
Aqueducts, . 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, . 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 
Pumping Stations, 

Chestnut Hill Stations, 

Spot Pond Station, 

Arlington Station, . 

Hyde Park Station, 
Consumption of Water, . 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes, 
Water supplied outside of Metropolitan Water District, 
Quality of the Water, ....... 

Sanitary Conditions on Watersheds, .... 

Wachusett Watershed, ...... 

Sudbury Watershed, ...... 

Cochituate Watershed, ...... 

Protection of the Water Supply by Filtration, . 
Improvement of Watersheds, ...... 

Forestry, ......... 

Wachusett Department, ...... 

Sudbury Department, . . . . . . 

Distribution Department, ..... 

Distribution Reservoirs, ...... 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs, 

Weston Reservoir, ■ . 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, 

Arlington, Bellevue, Forbes Hill and Mystic Reservoirs, 
Distribution Pipe Lines, ...... 

Extensions and Relocations by Maintenance Force, 

Pipe Bridges, ........ 

Breaks and Leaks, ....... 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gages, 

Electrolysis, . . 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works, ..... 
Wachusett Power Station, 
Engineering, ........ 



and 



Whitehall Reser- 



PAGE 

45 
45 
46 
46 
47 
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49 
52 
54 
58 
59 
59 
59 
60 
63 
64 



CONTENTS. 



Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works, 
Organization, .... 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, . 

Areas and Populations, . 
Metropolitan Sewers, . 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections 
Construction, ...... 

North Metropolitan System, . 

Deer Island Outfall Extension, 
Section 19, Maiden River Siphon, 
South Metropolitan System, . 

Section 43, Relief Outfall, Nut Island, 
High-level Sewer Extension to Wellesley, 
Section 106, Wellesley and Needham, 
Section 105, Needham, 
Section 104, Needham, 
Section 103, Needham, 
Maintenance, . . . 

Scope of Work and Force employed 

New Mystic Sewer, 

Deer Island Pumping Station, 

East Boston Pumping Station, 

Charlestown Pumping Station, 

Cleaning of old Mystic Valley Sewer 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 

Nut Island Screen-house, 

Section 70, High-level Sewer, . 

Gasolene in Public Sewers, 

Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in Winchester 

Stoneham, 
Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage to 
System, .... 

North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 
Whole Metropolitan System, 
Pumping Stations, 

Capacity and Results, 

North Metropolitan System, 

Deer Island Pumping Station, 
East Boston Pumping Station, 
Charlestown Pumping Station, 
Alewife Brook Pumping Station, 
South Metropolitan System, 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 
Quincy Pumping Station, 
Nut Island Screen-house, 
Quincy Sewage Lifting Station, 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls, 
Material intercepted at the Screens, 



Woburn and 
Metropolitan Sewerage 



Appendix No. 1. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending dur- 
ing the Year 1915, . . 

- Cement Tests made on the Metropolitan Water Works, 1901 to 1907, 

- Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, 

— Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water 
Works in 1915, 

— Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1915, 

— Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1915, . 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1915, 
Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897 to 1915, 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1915, 



Appendix No. 2. - 

Appendix No. 3. - 

Table No. 1. 

Table No. 2. 

Table No. 3. 

Table No. 4. 

Table No. 5. 

Table No. 6. 



136 
143 
145 

145 
146 
147 
148 
150 
151 



vi CONTENTS. 

Appendix No. 3 — Continued. page 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile 

from 1897 to 1915, 153 

Table No. 8. — ■ Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1875 to 1915, 155 

Table No. 9. — Wachusett System. — ■ Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1915, 158 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 

1915 159 

Table No. 11. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1915, 160 

Table No. 12. — ■ Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at the 

Beginning of Each Month, ........ 161 

Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn for the 

Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, ..... 162 

Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1915 by 

Months, 163 

Table No. 15. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Station No. 1 for the Year 1915, 164 

Table No. 16. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 for the Year 1915 165 

Table No. 17. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 5, 6 and 7 at Chestnut Hill 

Pumping Station No. 2 for the Year 1915, 166 

Table No. 18. — ■ Statement of Operation of Engine No. 12 at Chestnut Hili Pumping 

Station No. 2 for the Year 1915, 167 

Table No. 19. — ■ Statement of Operation of Engine No. 8 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1915 168 

Table No. 20. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1915, 169 

Table No. 21. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 10 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1915, 170 

Table No. 22. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 11 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1915, > . . . .171 

Table No. 23. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 13 and 14 at Hyde Park Pumping 

Station for the Year 1915 172 

Table No. 24. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by Districts in Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works in 1915, . . 173 

Table No. 25. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns 

supplied from Metropolitan Works in 1915, ..... 174 

Table No. 26. — (Pump Basis) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, 

as constituted in the Year 1915, and a Small Section of the Town of 

Saugus, from 1893 to 1915, 177 

Table No. 27. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, 179 
Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . 180 

Table No. 29. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . 181 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, .... 182 
Table No. 31. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, 183 
Table No. 32. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1915, . 184 

Table No. 33. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, from 1892 to 

1915 185 

Table No. 34. — Microscopic Organisms in Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, from 1898 to 1915, inclusive, 186 

Table No. 35. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various Parts of 

the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1915, inclusive, . . 188 

Table No. 36. — ■ Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 

1915 189 

Table No. 37. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1915, ' 190 

Table No. 38. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1915 191 

Table No. 39. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections 

owned and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and 

Number of Valves set in Same, Dec. 31, 1915, ..... 192 



CONTENTS. vii 

Appendix No. 3 — Concluded. page 

Table No. 40. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes, owned and 

operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Dec. 31, 1915, . 193 
Table No. 41. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 
Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 31, 

1915, ' 194 

Table No. 42. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . 195 

Table No. 43. — Average Elevations of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet above Boston 
City Base for each Month at Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works 

during 1915, 196 

Appendix No. 4. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1915, ...... 198 

Appendix No. 5. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the Year 1915, 200 

Appendix No. 6. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court on Jan. 17, 1916, . 207 

Appendix No. 7. — Legislation of the Year 1915 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board, 212 



Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has al- 
ready presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account 
of its receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and liabilities for 
the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1915, and now, in accordance 
with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906, 
presents a detailed statement of its doings for the calendar year 
ending on December 31, 1915, being its 

FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

Board, Officers and Employees. 

The term of office of Thomas E. Dwyer expired on March 20, and 
he was reappointed for the term of three years next succeeding. At 
the end of the year the Board consisted of Henry P. Walcott, 
chairman, Edward A. McLaughlin and Thomas E. Dwyer. William 
N. Davenport has continued as secretary. Alfred F. Bridgman has 
been the purchasing agent and Miss Alice G. Mason the bookkeeper. 

There are also employed in the administrative office a paymaster, 
an assistant in auditing, two general clerks, three stenographers and 
clerks, a telephone operator, and a janitor with two assistants, both 
of whom act as watchmen. 

Such general conveyancing work and investigation of real estate 
titles in the different counties as have been called for during the 
year have been performed by George D. Bigelow. 

The consulting engineers of the Board are Hiram F. Mills and 
Frederic P. Stearns, who are called upon for services when matters 
arise which require their consideration. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Dexter Brackett, Chief Engineer of Water Works, died on August 
26, 1915, and the Board makes this record of its appreciation: — 
In the death of Mr. Brackett the Board feels that the Commonwealth 
has lost a tried and faithful public servant, who has rendered most 
important service in the construction and maintenance of the Metro- 
politan Water Works. Mr. Brackett had been connected with the 
Water Department of the City of Boston for many years prior to the 
creation of the Metropolitan Water Board in 1895. Upon the organ- 
ization of that Board he was appointed Engineer of the Distribu- 
tion Department, which position he held during the existence of the 
Board. Upon the abolition of the above named Board and the creation 
of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board in 1901 he was reap- 
pointed Engineer of the Distribution Department and continued to 
serve in that capacity until February 1, 1907, when he was pro- 
moted to the position of Chief Engineer of Water Works. During 
his connection with the Metropolitan Water Works he was in charge 
of the construction of the Distribution System and considerable por- 
tions of the Wachusett and Sudbury systems. Wise forethought, 
faithful devotion, careful and painstaking management in the execu- 
tion of the duties entrusted to him have characterized the perform- 
ance of all his work during his service of more than twenty years. 

Since Mr. Brackett's death William E. Foss has been Acting Chief 
Engineer of Water Works. The following have also continued as 
superintendents of departments under the direction of the Acting 
Chief Engineer: Elliot R. B. Allardice, Superintendent of the Wachu- 
sett Department; Charles E. Haberstroh, Superintendent of the 
Sudbury and Cochituate Works and of the portion of the Weston 
Aqueduct above the Weston Reservoir; Samuel E. Killam, Superin- 
tendent in charge of the Weston Reservoir and the remaining portion 
of the Weston Aqueduct, and of all distributing reservoirs and pipe 
lines within the Metropolitan Water District; and Arthur E. O'Neil, 
Superintendent of the several pumping stations. 

The average engineering force employed on construction and main- 
tenance during the year has included, in addition to the Acting Chief 
Engineer, 4 department superintendents, 1 division engineer, 10 as- 
sistant engineers and 35 others in various engineering capacities, and 
as sanitary inspectors, clerks, stenographers and messengers, the 
total force numbering 51. 

A maintenance force in addition to those engaged in engineering 



No. 57 J. AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

capacities, as above mentioned, numbering upon the average during 
the year 256, has been required at the pumping stations, upon 
reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and upon minor construction work. 
At the end of the year this force numbered 238. 

Frederick D. Smith, Engineer of Sewerage Works, has had charge 
of both construction and maintenance of the works. He has been as- 
sisted by Henry T. Stiff, Division Engineer in charge of the office and 
drafting, by 4 assistant engineers and by 15 others employed in dif- 
ferent engineering capacities, and by 2 stenographers and clerks. 

The maximum engineering force employed at any one time during 
the year on the construction and maintenance of the Sewerage 
Works was 22. 

The regular maintenance force required in addition for the opera- 
tion of the pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers, 
and for other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of the engineers 
and day-labor forces, on the average has been 167. 

The whole regular force of the Sewerage Department at the end of 
the year numbered 189, of whom the Engineer and 21 assistants and 
draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, and of the 
remainder, 101 were employed upon the North System and 66 upon 
the South System. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts and upon 
day-labor construction on the Sewerage Works during the year was 
for the week ending November 20, when the number amounted 
to 340. 

II. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

The Metropolitan Water District now comprises the cities of 
Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, 
Quincy, Revere and Somerville, and the towns of Arlington, Bel- 
mont, Lexington, Milton, Nahant, Stoneham, Swampscott, Watertown 
and Winthrop, — in all 10 cities and 9 towns. The District has an 
area of 174.8 square miles, no additional municipalities having been 
admitted into the District during the year. Its population, accord- 
ing to the State Census taken for April 1, 1915, was 1,201,300. 
The population of the District on July 1, 1915, the date upon 
which calculations for the Water Works are based, was estimated 
as 1,207,880. 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



III. METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The total amount expended for the construction and acquisition 
of the Metropolitan Water Works since the passage of the Metropol- 
itan Water Act in the year 1895 has been $42,818,170.64. 

The total amount expended during the calendar year on account 
of the construction and acquisition of works has been $404,030.09. 
The details of this expenditure are as follows: on account of the 
construction of a steel tank or reservoir on Bellevue Hill with con- 
necting pipe lines and the reinforcement of the southern high-service 
pipe lines in Milton, the sum of $77,592.51; for the work on lowering 
water pipes in Chelsea Creek, $25,257.67; for work on account of the 
power plant at Sudbury Dam, $50,15.1.16; for laying 60-inch Weston 
Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 5, $223,570.52; for stock on hand, 
$21,963.57; and for other minor works, engineering and administra- 
tion expenses, the sum of $5,494.66. 

The completed work of the year includes the construction of a 
42-inch cast-iron water main under Chelsea Creek between Chelsea 
and East Boston to provide for the deepening of the ship channel by 
the United States Government. This work was finally completed in 
the early days of January. Subsequent to the completion of the line 
the two old pipe lines were removed from the channel and the whole 
work was finally completed in the last days of February. 

The work of laying a second 24-inch cast-iron southern high- 
service main about 13,000 feet in length from Dorchester Lower 
Mills through Adams Street in Milton and Quincy to the junction of 
Adams and Beale streets in Quincy, to reinforce the 24-inch main 
laid in 1897 and 1898, was finally completed under a contract with 
John J. Evans of Lawrence. While it was originally planned to 
connect this new 24-inch pipe line with the Metropolitan Water 
Works 36-inch main at the junction of Morton and River streets in 
Dorchester, it was found possible to make a more advantageous con- 
nection by purchasing from the City of Boston for $4,216.62, a por- 
tion of the Boston 36-inch main about 461 feet in length. The new 
24-inch main was then laid from the junction of River and Washing- 
ton streets through Washington Street to Sanford Street and con- 
nected with the 36-inch main thus purchased. 

The steel tank for the southern extra high-service reservoir on 
Bellevue Hill in West Roxbury, which is 100 feet in diameter and 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

44 feet 3 inches in height and has a capacity of 2,500,000 gallons, was 
filled with water and tested for leakage on January 9, with a satis- 
factory result. On March 25 the tank was taken out of service, 
drained and painted. The masonry tower which encloses the tank 
has been built under a contract with John Cashman & Sons Co. The 
tower is 114 feet 2 inches in outside diameter at the base and 108 
feet 2 inches in inside diameter. It is 47J feet in height from the 
concrete foundation to the top of the cornice. A parapet wall 4 
feet in height above the cornice surrounds the roof. The tower is of 
Bay View gray Rockport granite backed with concrete, with the ex- 
ception of that portion of the tower which is below the surface of 
the ground, which is of concrete. 

Work has also been in progress during the year upon the 60-inch 
Weston Aqueduct supply main which, connecting with that portion 
laid in 1909 and 1910, extends through Commonwealth Avenue to 
the Charles River, a distance of about 14,500 feet. The work was 
divided into two contracts, one with Andrew M. Cusack of Boston, 
for laying 7,990 linear feet of the pipe line east of Auburn Street, 
and another with Charles A. Kelley of Somerville, for laying the 
remainder of the line, with the exception of the crossing under the 
Boston & Albany Railroad where a 60-inch steel pipe line was laid. 
Both these contracts were practically finished at the end of the year.. 

Work has also been in progress during the year for the construc- 
tion of the hydro-electric plant to utilize the water power available 
at the Sudbury Dam in Southborough. Substantial difficulties have 
been experienced in the adaptation of the gate-house at this dam for 
the purposes of an electric power station but these have all been 
satisfactorily surmounted, and it is hoped that the production of 
electric energy for delivery to the Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany can be begun by the first of April. 

IV. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

The maintenance and operation of the Metropolitan W T ater Works 
during the past calendar year have required the expenditure of 
$447,659.62. 

(1) Storage Reservoirs. 
The water in the Wachusett Reservoir reached its highest eleva- 
tion, 392.42, on August 25. 

The Sudbury Reservoir during the year has been maintained at a 



6 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



low level in order to facilitate the changes which are being made at 
the Sudbury Dam for the installation of the electric system. Fram- 
ingham Reservoir No. 3 and Lake Cochituate have been kept nearly 
full during the year. 

It has not been necessary to draw water for the supply of the 
Metropolitan District from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, Framing- 
ham Reservoir No. 2, Farm Pond, Ashland, Hopkinton and White- 
hall reservoirs and Lake Cochituate. 

(2) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in service for the passage of water 
from the Wachusett Reservoir to the Sudbury Reservoir during the 
whole or portions of 260 days. The quantity of water flowing 
through the aqueduct was equal to an average of 70,280,548 gallons 
per day for the entire year. Of the total quantity of water admitted 
to the aqueduct 90.2 per cent, was used before its admission for the 
development of electric energy. 

For distribution to the cities and towns of the Metropolitan Water 
District water was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct to the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir every day in the year, the daily average for 
the whole year being 63,261,000 gallons. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use during 349 days, the quantity 
of water delivered through the aqueduct being equivalent to a daily 
average of 33,573,000 gallons. 

(3) Pumping Stations. 

The total amount of water pumped at all the pumping stations 
was 27,706,300,000 gallons, which is 1,024,860,000 gallons less than 
in the previous year. 

The following are the several pumping stations: — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift 
(Feet). 



Chestnut Hill high-service station, 
Chestnut Hill low-service station, 
Chestnut Hill low-service station, 
Spot Pond station, 
Arlington station, 
Hyde Park station, 



66,000,000 

105,000,000 

40,000,000 

30,000,000 

3,000,000 

6,000,000 



138 
60 
130 
125 
290 
140 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 7 

The cost of operating the stations was $96,847.21, equivalent to 
$3,495 per million gallons pumped. The total cost is somewhat less 
than for the year 1914, the cost per million gallons showing a 
decrease of $0,153, the saving being due largely to the smaller 
amount expended for repairs. 

The total amount of coal purchased during the year was 7,361.17 
gross tons, of which 5,945.73 tons were bituminous and 1,415.44 
tons anthracite. All of the anthracite coal was buckwheat and 
screenings. The cost of bituminous coal delivered in the bins at the 
various stations varied from $3.93 to $5.06, and the cost of anthra- 
cite coal varied from $2.50 to $3.08 per ton. 

(4) Protection of the Water Supply. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, on which is filtered the water 
received from brooks passing through the thickly settled portions of 
Marlborough, have been adequate for the filtration of all the water 
received. 

The Began Brook pumping station, at which is pumped upon the 
filter-beds the surface drainage of about one square mile in the 
thickly settled portion of Natick, was in operation 272 days in the 
year. 

The filter-beds which receive for filtration the water flowing 
through the thickly settled portion of the town of Sterling, as well as 
the smaller filter-beds which receive the drainage from a few houses 
near Sterling Junction, the Worcester County Training School at 
West Boylston and from the swimming pool at Southborough, have 
been in successful operation and required only the usual attention 
during the year. 

Studies for the disposal of manufacturing wastes, as well as for 
the disposal of house drainage from the various towns within the 
drainage area of the Metropolitan Water System, have been in 
progress during the year. 

Constant inspection of the watersheds has been maintained by the 
Sanitary Inspector and his assistants and members of the main- 
tenance force. 

Chemical examinations of the waters used were made by the State 
Department of Health, and in addition, microscopical and bacterial 
examinations were made by the Board. These examinations enable 
the Board to take measures to remedy any difficulties which are 
found to exist. 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The quality of the water brought to the Metropolitan District 
continues to be satisfactory both in taste and in appearance. This 
condition results in a large measure from the fact that it is still 
possible to reject some of the sources which were in use before the 
extension of- the water works to the South Branch of the Nashua 
River at Clinton. The water derived from the Wachusett watershed 
has been of superior quality to that coming from the Sudbury and 
Cochituate sources. The first-named supply, so far as possible, has 
been that conveyed to the District; the others have been wasted to 
a greater or less extent as occasion has permitted. 

The time, however, is approaching when all the sources will be re- 
quired for the supply of the District. When that day arrives it will be 
necessary, without doubt, to filter these inferior waters in order to bring 
them to the standard of excellence to which the District has become 
accustomed since the establishment of the Metropolitan water supply. 

The subject of adequate filtration has been carefully considered, 
and whenever the need of such treatment becomes urgent, the Board 
will be in a position at once to construct the necessary works. 

During the year the Board acquired the fee of 103.118 acres of 
land for the protection and improvement of the water supply. 

(5) Clinton Sewerage Works. 

Certain changes have been made in the treatment of the filter-beds 
at South Lancaster during the year which have caused the removal 
of some complaints made of disagreeable odors noticed in the vicinity 
of the beds at nightfall or during some of the warmer days of the year, 
and no complaint has reached the Board during the past season which 
could justly be attributed to the condition of the filter-beds. 

(6) Forestry. 

About 140 acres of the Wachusett Reservoir marginal lands were 
planted with 171,900 three and four-year-old pine seedlings from the 
Oakdale nursery. About one-half of these were raised from seed; 
the remainder were received from the State nursery at Amherst 
when one year old. 

For the purpose of establishing shade trees along the property of 
the Commonwealth on the highways bordering the reservoir, 1,022 
sugar maple saplings were set out along 6J miles of highway to re- 
place trees that were set out in former years and failed to grow. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 9 

Undesirable trees and other growth of an inferior character were 
cut from 180 acres of land where there was a growth of young white 
pines from five to eight years old. It has been the policy of the 
Board to remove, so far as a convenient use of the working force of 
the department is possible, undesirable trees and underbrush on 
various portions of the lands controlled by it. In the two nurseries 
maintained at Oakdale and the North Dike there are at present in 
good condition 175,650 seedlings. 

About 66 acres of Sudbury and Cochituate marginal lands were 
cleared of trees and brush for planting and on these lands and along 
the aqueducts 124,175 three and four-year-old seedlings were set out. 
There are now in the Sudbury nursery 106,000 seedlings which will 
be ready for transplanting next spring. 

The ravages of the gypsy and brown-tail moths and of the 
elm-leaf beetle have continued during the year, requiring a large 
amount of work and considerable expense to protect the trees on 
lands controlled by the Board. The egg clusters of the gypsy moth 
have been painted with creosote and nests of the brown-tail moths 
destroyed by burning, and extensive spraying has been required for 
the preservation of trees infested by moths and elm-leaf beetles. 

(7) Wachusett Power Plant. 

The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam was op- 
erated on 241 days during the year. The daily output varied from 
the minimum amount which the Connecticut River Transmission 
Company is required to take under its contract, to the full capacity 
of the plant. The operation of the plant continues to be successful, 
the gross earnings for the year being $26,252.29. The cost of operat- 
ing the plant has been $8,125.47, the net earnings $18,126.82, and 
the net earnings per thousand kilowatt hours generated, $3,661. 

(8) Rainfall and Water Supply. 

The rainfall is still below the average, but somewhat more than in 
the preceding year. On the Wachusett watershed the rainfall was 
44.65 inches and on the Sudbury watershed 43.93 inches, while the 
averages for the periods covered by the records have been, respec- 
tively, 45.39 inches and 44.79 inches. 

The Wachusett watershed yielded a daily average of 942,000 gal- 
lons of water per square mile, and the Sudbury watershed yielded a 



10 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

daily average of 719,000 gallons. The Wachusett watershed yielded a 
daily average of 1,066,000 gallons per square mile, for the 19 years 
during which measurements have been made, and the daily average 
per square mile from the Sudbury watershed during the 41 years for 
which records have been kept has been 988,000 gallons. 

(9) Water Consumption. 

During the year the quantity of water supplied to the Metropoli- 
tan Water District amounted to a daily average of 101,941,500 gal- 
lons, as measured by Metropolitan Water Works meters, which was 
equivalent to 88 gallons for each person in the District. This quan- 
tity was 5,094,600 gallons less than the average daily consumption 
of the preceding year. 

Acting under the authority conferred by several statutes and ar- 
rangements which have been made, water has been supplied to a 
limited extent outside of the Metropolitan Water District. There has 
been drawn from the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct for 
the use of the Westborough State Hospital a daily average quantity 
of 188,000 gallons. The town of Framingham has, under the pro- 
vision of the statute, drawn indirectly from Farm Pond a daily 
average quantity of 626,301 gallons and directly from the Sudbury 
Aqueduct 157,260 gallons. A portion of the town of Saugus has 
been supplied through the town of Revere with an average of 
14,700 gallons daily. The United States Government, for use on 
Peddock's Island, has been supplied with a daily average of 77,100 
gallons, and a daily average of 128,219 gallons has been furnished to 
the city of Worcester as an emergency supply. The sums charged 
for the water thus supplied have amounted to $7,301.73. 

V. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Board for the State fiscal year, beginning with 
December 1, 1914, and ending with November 30, 1915, was, in 
accordance with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, presented to the General Court in January last, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 6. 

As required by said chapter a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year 1915, in relation to the Metropolitan Water Works, 
is herewith presented. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 11 

Construction. 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments. 
Total loans authorized to January 1, 1916, $42,798,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the construc- 
tion and acquisition of works: — 
For the period prior to January 1, 1915, . $242,927 00 
For the year ending December 31, 1915, . 2,006 56 

244,933 56 

Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to District 

(St. 1909, c. 320), . . . . . 90,000 00 



Total amount authorized to January 1, 1916, . . . $43,132,933 56 

Amounts approved by Board for payments out of Water Loan 
Fund: — 
Payments prior to January 1, 1915, . $42,414,140 55 
Approved for year ending December 31, 

1915, 404,030 09 

42,818,170 64 



Amount authorized but not expended January 1, 1916, . $314,762 92 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1915. 

Water Loan Outstanding, Sinking Fund and Debt. 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3| per cent.), .... $41,398,000 00 
Serial bonds (3| and 4 per cent.), 1,138,000 00 



Total bond issue to December 31, 1915, . . . . $42,536,000 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1915, . $25,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1915, 17,000 00 

42,000 00 



Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1915, . . $42,494,000 00 

Gross Water Debt, $42,494,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1915, 12,491,245 25 



Net Water Debt December 31, 1915, $30,002,754 75 

A decrease for the year of $484,791.80. 



12 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 
December 31, 1915. 



Year. 



Authorized 
Loans. 



Bonds 

issued (Sinking 

Fund). 



Bonds 

issued (Serial 

Bonds). 



Sinking Fund. 



1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 

m 

1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1913, 
1914, 
1915, 



$27,000,000 



13,000,000 



500,000 

398,000 
900,000 
80,000 
212,000 
600,000 
108,000 



$5,000,000 
2,000,000 
6,000,000 
4,000,000 
3,000,000 
1,000,000 

10,000,000 
3,500,000 
1,500,000 
2,500,000 
650,000 
1,350,000 



398,000 
500,000 



$200,000 
190,000 

258,000 
490,000 



$226,286 05 

699,860 70 

954,469 00 

1,416,374 29 

1,349,332 97 

1,573,619 72 

1,662,426 95 

2,256,803 81 

2,877,835 59 

3,519,602 92 

4,207,045 69 

4,897,822 62 

5,643,575 69 

6,419,283 28 

7,226,262 31 

8,089,902 91 

8,953,437 44 

9,829,356 80 

10,767,701 68 

11,533,453 45 

12,491,245 25 



$42,798,000 



$41,398,000 



$1,138,000 



(4) Water Assessment, 1915. 

The following water assessment was made by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth upon the various municipalities: — 

Sinking fund requirements, . ' , $276,733 97 

Serial bonds, . $30,000 00 

Less premium, 7,933 10 

22,066 90 

Interest, 1,447,905 41 

Maintenance: — 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $460,835 00 

Less balance on hand, 43,211 74 

417,623 26 

Total water assessment for 1915, $2,164,329 54 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



13 



In accordance with chapter 488, Acts of 1895, as amended in 1901, 
1904 and 1906, the proportion to be paid by each city and town is 
based one-third in proportion to their respective valuations and 
the remaining two-thirds in proportion to their respective water 
consumption for the preceding year, except that but one-fifth of 
the total valuation and no consumption has been taken for the 
city of Newton, as it has not been supplied with water from the 
Metropolitan Works. 

The division of the assessment for 1915 was as follows: — 



Cities and Towns. 

Arlington, 

Belmont, .... 

Boston, .... 

Chelsea, .... 

Everett, .... 

Lexington, 

Maiden, .... 

Medford, .... 

Melrose, .... 

Milton, .... 



Assessment. 



$17,850 63 
10,106 51 
1,665,006 20 
49,742 74 
47,776 83 
8,437 21 
45,702 09 
27,821 61 
19,321 32 
16,430 78 



Cities and Towns. 



Nahant, . 
Newton, . 
Quincy, . 
Revere, . 
Somerville, 
Stoneham, 
Swampscott, 
Watertown, 
Winthrop, 



Assessment. 



$5,574 45 

6,124 92 

50,070 54 

28,816 53 

110,781 34 

7,269 00 

11.858 74 

19,942 86 

15,695 24 



$2,164,329 54 



(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of 
District and to Water Companies. 

Sums have been received during the year 1915 under the provi- 
sions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as fol- 
lows : — 

Town of Framingham, $1,478 61 

Town of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of the 

town of Saugus for 1914), 250 00 

United States Government (for Peddock's Island), . . . . ' 1,955 60 

Westborough State Hospital, 1,698 69 

Wakefield, * . . 7,800 31 

Worcester, 1,357 20 

$14,540 41 

The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually dis- 
tributed among the cities and towns of the District; but since that 



14 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



date, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 238 of the Acts 
of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking fund. 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



CONSTRUCTION AND ACQUISITION OP WORKS. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the construction and acquisition of 

the works, 

Wachusett Department, . . . . 

Power Plant at Sudbury Dam, 

Distribution system: — 
Low service: — 

Lowering pipe at Chelsea Creek, 

Southern high service: — 

Section 43 (24-inch main in Dorchester through Milton to Quincy), 
Southern extra high service: — 

Section 42 (20-inch main to reservoir on Bellevue Hill), .... 

Bellevue Reservoir on Bellevue Hill in Boston, 

Weston Aqueduct supply mains, 

Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased and sent first to storage yards, 
and later transferred, as needed, to the various parts of the work: — 

Amount received, 

Transferred from storage yards to the various sections of the work and in- 
cluded in costs of special works 

Acquisition of existing water works: — 
Completed works, City of Boston 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1915, 

Total for construction and acquisition of works to January 1, 1916, 



$25,257 67 

29,131 45 

1,460 46 

47,000 60 

223,570 52 



$159,107 53 
137,143 96 



$821 60 

456 44 

50,151 16 



326,420 70 



21,963 57 



4,216 62 

$404,030 09 
42,414,140 55 

$42,818,170 64 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



15 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Administration, . . 

General supervision, 

Taxes and other expenses, 

Wachusett Department: — 

Superintendence, . . . . . . 

Reservoir, 

Forestry, ... 

Protection of supply, 

Buildings and grounds, . . . 

Wachusett Dam, . . . . . . . • 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system : — 

Pumping station, 

Sewers, screens and filter-beds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Swamp drainage, 

Power plant, 

Sudbury Department: — 
Superintendence, Framingham office, . 

Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 

Sudbury Reservoir, . 

Lake Cochituate, '..... 

Marlborough Brook filters, . 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 

Sanitary inspection 

Cochituate Aqueduct 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Forestry, ,. . . 

Improvement and protection of water supplies 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Distribution Department: — 

Superintendence, 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, . 
Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, . 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, 

Hyde Park pumping station, pumping service, 

Bear Hill Reservoir 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds, 

Fells Reservoir, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, . . . " 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, ....... 

Mystic Reservoir 

Amounts carried forward, 



$18,114 12 


28,256 33 


41,229 48 


$8,036 17 


5,985 09 


14,298 86 


26,990 59 


4,817 28 


4,059 84 


8,920 56 


1,427 31 


5,256 07 


2,729 02 


1,609 26 


5,325 47 
pp k? «i 




$10,123 64 


1,860 90 


2,238 37 


899 34 


6,041 87 


9,702 80 


3,977 96 


2,194 09 


3,690 51 


1,162 61 


3,143 52 


3,031 17 


6,387 12 


5,071 09 


8,266 90 


12,580 74 


784 84 


qn 1^7 17 




$4,554 44 


8,379 81 


50,000 55 


16,002 43 


14,508 00 


6,858 14 


292 15 


11,390 57 


512 50 


1,359 25 


2,148 30 


1,658 29 



$117,664 43 $257,212 92 



16 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Distribution Department — ■ Con. 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Weston Reservoir, 

Spot Pond 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Pipe lines: — 

Low service, . / 

Northern high service, 

Northern extra high service, 

Southern high service, 

Southern extra high service, . . 

Supply pipe lines, 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

Stables, 

Venturi meters, 

Measurement of water, 

Arlington pumping station, buildings and grounds, 

Hyde Park pumping station, buildings and grounds 

Fisher Hill Reservoir, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 
Improvement and protection of water supplies, 

Total for maintaining and operating works, . . . 



$117,664 43 $257,212 92 



238 70 


4,246 78 


12,099 81 


271 27 


19,476 83 


4,907 09 


73 20 


5,175 21 


610 57 


5,395 17 


849 73 


1,455 03 


3,112 68 


6,383 15 


921 74 


1,663 88 


476 30 


168 70 


2,292 53 


370 00 


2,593 90 


100 MR 1(\ 




$447,659 62 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the requirements 
of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the expendi- 
tures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year 
1915. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works f or the year beginning 
January 1, 1915, and ending December 31, 1915, was $404,030.09, 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1915, has 
been $42,818,170.64. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year 
were $447,659.62. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



17 



The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of 
administration, have been apportioned to the construction of the 
works and to the maintenance and operation of the same, and 
appear under each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character: — 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Construction op Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

Administration. 

Commissioners, 

Clerks and stenographers, . 

Stationery and printing 

Postage, express and telegrams, . . 

Telephone, lighting, heatiDg, water and care of building, 

Alterations and repairs of building, . . 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Engineering. 

Chief engineer, 

Principal assistant engineers, 

Engineering assistants, 

Consulting engineers, • 

Inspectors, 

Railroad and street car travel, 

Wagon hire, 

Stationery and printing, . . . 

Postage, express and telegrams, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Books, maps and photographic supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of buildings: 

Main office 

Sub-offices, . 

Alterations and repairs of building — main office, . 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Construction. 
Preliminary work: — 

Advertising, 

Labor, 

Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware supplies, 



Amount carried forward, 



$100 00 

160 00 

349 39 

43 

85 32 

44 

113 62 

12 40 



$305 13 

2,558 37 

9,299 74 

1,050 00 

6,511 02 

772 83 

1 00 

294 33 

3 71 

33 63 

127 35 

48 66 

256 03 

13 71 

1 31 

340 87 

381 15 



$107 39 

65 00 

2 50 



$821 60 



21,998 84 



174 89 



$22,995 33 



18 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Amount brought forward, . . . 

Construction — Con. 
Contracts, Distribution System: — 

Coleman Bros., lowering pipe at Chelsea Creek, Contract 354, . 

John J. Evans, for laying water pipe in Boston, Milton and Quincy, Section 
43 of southern high service, Contract 359, . . 

Charles R. Gow Co., for laying water pipe in Boston, Section 42 of southern 
extra high service, Contract 360, 

John E. Palmer, for constructing foundation for reservoir on Bellevue Hill 
in Boston, Contract 361, 

Pratt & Cady Co., for furnishing water valves, Contract 367, 

Standard Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co., for furnishing special castings, 
Contract 365, 

Walsh's Holyoke Steam Boiler Works, for building steel tank or reservoir on 
Bellevue Hill in Boston, Contract 357, 

Walsh's Holyoke Steam Boiler Works, for furnishing and laying steel pipes 
on Section 5 of the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Contract 366 (in 
part), . • 

Walsh's Holyoke Steam Boiler Works, for furnishing and laying steel pipes 
on Section 43 of the southern high service pipe lines, Contract 366 (in 
part), 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., for cast-iron water pipe 
and special castings, Contract 362, 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., for cast-iron water pipe 
and special castings, Contract 363, 

John Cashman & Sons Co., for building masonry tower on Bellevue Hill in 
Boston, Contract 368, . . . 

Andrew M. Cusack, for laying water pipes in portion of Section 5 of the 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains in Newton, Contract 369, . 

Charles A. Kelley, for laying water pipes in portion of Section 5 of the 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains in Newton, Contract 370, . 
Contracts, Power Plant at Sudbury Dam: — 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., for furnishing special cast- 
ings, Contract 371, 

Wonham, Sanger & Bates, Inc., for building and erecting hand power travel- 
ing crane and runway at the Power House at Sudbury Dam, Contract 
372, 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., for furnishing and installing hydro- 
electric machinery at Sudbury Dam, Contract 364A, .... 

Additional work: — 

Labor, 

Professional services, physicians, chemists, et als., 

Traveling, 

Rent, • 

Freight and express, 

Jobbing and repairing, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$16,647 11 


9,990 93 


1,034 74 


957 34 


3,225 00 


4,534 07 


5,895 14 



1,720 00 

1,600 00 
78,838 14 
70,640 96 
34,109 51 
40,597 13 
27,633 62 

1,082 55 

880 00 
5,000 00 



$39,740 38 
146 27 

27 50 
129 14 
907 70 

35 75 



$22,995 33 



304,386 24 



$40,986 74 $327,381 57 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Construction — Con. 
Additional work — Con. 
Tools, machinery, appliances, and hardware supplies, 
Electrical supplies, . . 

Castings, ironwork and metals, .... 
Iron pipe and valves, . . . 

Blasting supplies, 

Paint and coating, 

Fuel, oil and waste, 

Lumber and field buildings, 

Brick, cement and stone, 

Sand, gravel and filling, 

Municipal and corporation work, .... 

Unclassified supplies, ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Real Estate. 
Legal and expert: — 
Conveyancing expenses, 

Damages. 
Legal and expert: — 

Legal services, 

Settlements, 

Purchase of Existing Water Works. 
Settlements: — 
City of Boston, completed works, . 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1915, 

Total amount of construction expenditures to January 1, 1916, 



1,986 74 $327,381 57 



3,796 01 


474 45 


1,500 94 


1,576 36 


15 50 


686 17 


1,606 03 


2,314 71 


1,084 28 


75 00 


17,012 91 


166 21 


680 15 



$5 00 
450 00 



71,975 46 



1 44 



455 00 



4,216 62 



$404,030 09 
42,414,140 55 

$42,818,170 64 



20 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants 

Kent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel, 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, . . . 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . . . 

General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, . . . 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel, 

Lighting, 

Care of building, . . 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Pumping service: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, ' 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Repairs; 

Small supplies 

Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Superintendents, 

Engineering assistants, . . . 

Sanitary inspectors, 

Labor, pay roll 

Labor, miscellaneous 

Alterations and repairs of pumping stations, 
Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures, 

Automobiles, 

Brick 

Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies, 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Cement and lime, 

Drafting and photo supplies, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$7,191 67 

7,789 94 

542 85 

8 14 

39 29 

74 90 

513 14 

131 52 

1,487 22 

114 83 
105 61 

115 11 



$21,748 00 
1,628 63 
108 56 
117 91 
224 70 
1,539 58 
121 15 
555 55 
412 12 
841 03 
959 10 



$62,916 27 

29,468 66 

1,023 26 

1,533 52 

807 22 



$7,320 00 

8,641 22 

4,056 18 

162,016 19 

2,746 08 

260 23 

545 09 

5,805 14 

157 66 

228 61 

1,311 29 

352 71 

167 50 



5,114 12 



28,256 33 



95,748 93 



$193,607 90 $142,119 38 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



21 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds — Con. 

Fertilizer and planting material, 

Freight and express, . 

Fuel 

Gypsy moth supplies, 

Hardware, . . . . . ' 

Hay and grain, 

Lighting, 

Lumber, . 

Machinery, 

Paints and oils, 

Pipe and fittings, 

Postage ' . ... 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, . . . . . 

Rubber and oiled goods, . . 

Stable expenses, , . 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Traveling expenses, 

Telephones, . 

Teaming, 

Tools and appliances, 

Vehicles, harnesses and fittings, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . 

Contracts: — 
Thomas Russo & Co., Contract 44-M, for constructing surface drains at 
Spot Pond 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropria- 
tions, 

Payments in lieu of taxes, 

Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, 



$193,607 90 $142,119 38 



1,758 44 


256 59 


1,792 15 


1,154 26 


1,431 47 


1,729 02 


229 46 


2,726 92 


976 66 


1,294 54 


891 78 


61 65 


441 60 


426 65 


592 07 


377 99 


2,386 40 


970 00 


787 43 


2,788 29 


221 99 


43,121 92 


3,130 74 


1,154 84 




41,229 48 


$447,659 62 



(6) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Board 
and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1915 
and ending December 31, 1915, was $241,924.50, and the total 
amount from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water 
Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1915, has been $1,252,545.80. 
The general character of these receipts is as follows: — 



22 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Receipts. 

Applicable to the loan fund: — 

Land and buildings, . 

Construction tools, supplies and reimbursements, 

Applicable to payment of expenses of maintenance and operation: — 
Proceeds from operations of the Board: — 

Rents, . 

Land products, 

Electric energy, . . 

Maintenance labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements, . . ' . 
Interest and unclassified receipts, 

Applicable to the sinking fund: — 
Water supplied to cities and towns, water companies and others, 
Reimbursement and payment for damages under Chap. 456, Acts 1897 and 
Chap. 351, Acts 1902, . 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1915, 

Total receipts to January 1, 1916, 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



$222 40 




1,784 16 






$2,006 56 




$1,542 50 




6,556 41 




25,713 86 




6,342 65 




314 34 






40,469 76 




$14,540 41 




184,907 77 






199,448 18 




$241,924 50 




1,010,621 30 


$>,252,545 80 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects or 
works, as follows : — 



Sources of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Supplying water outside of Water District, 

Construction and acquisition of works: — 

Administration, 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Sudbury Reservoir, .... 

Distribution system, 



Maintenance and operation of works: — 
Administration, .... 
General supervision, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Wachusett Reservoir, 
Electric power plant, 
Sudbury system, .... 
Distribution system, 
Clinton sewerage system, 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1915, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1916, .... 





$14,540 41 


$81 25 




184,907 77 




27 72 




1,921 34 






186,938 08 




$191 58 




200 89 




90 95 




5,870 58 




25,726 86 




2,145 67 




3,468 17 




2,751 31 






40,446 01 




$241,924 50 




1,010,621 30 


$1,252,545 80 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



23 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board: — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; ma- 
chinery, tools and other appliances and supplies; completed works, real 
estate and buildings connected therewith. 



(d) Liabilities. 

The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $562.61 and there 
are bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


Camoia & Williams, .... 
Joseph Hanreddy, .... 
John Cashman & Sons Co., . 
Andrew M. Cusack, .... 
Charles A. Kelley, .... 
Thomas Russo & Co., . 


Contract 308, Section 33 of northern high-service 

pipe lines, Distribution System. 
Contract 314, Section 7 of the Weston Aqueduct 

Supply Mains. 
Contract 368, for building masonry tower on 

Bellevue Hill in Boston. 
Contract 369, for portion of Section 5 of Weston 

Aqueduct Supply Mains. 
Contract 370, for portion of Section 5 of Weston 

Aqueduct Supply Mains. 
Contract 44-M, for constructing surface drains at 

Spot Pond. 


$200 00 

10 00 

6,019 33 

4,581 85 

4,417 70 

552 48 



Claims have been made by the following parties for land taken : — 
John Ward et ah, heirs of George K. Ward, Town of Framingham, 
William H. Buck, heirs of Harrison Eames, Lizzie W. Sampson. 



VI. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The North Metropolitan Sewerage District embraces the cities of 
Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Revere, 
Somerville and Woburn, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Stone- 
ham, Wakefield, Winchester and Winthrop and parts of the city of 
Boston and the town of Lexington, — comprising in all 10 cities and 
7 towns, with an area of 90.50 square miles. The district has an 
estimated population, based upon the census of 1915, as of December 
31, 1915, of 601,810. Of the total population it is estimated that 



24 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

90.1 per cent., or 542,575 people, contribute sewage to the North 
Metropolitan System. 

The South Metropolitan Sewerage District includes the cities of 
Newton, Quincy and Waltham, and the towns of Brookline, Milton, 
Watertown and Wellesley, and parts of the city of Boston and the 
town of Dedham,. — a total of 4 cities and -5 towns. This district has 
an area of 110.76 square miles, with an estimated population as of 
December 31, 1915, of 438,580. According to the estimates made 
68.5 per cent, of this population, or 300,435, contribute sewage to the 
South Metropolitan System. 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

The amount expended for construction on account of the North 
Metropolitan System during the past year was $34,308.85. 

A beginning has been made in the construction of the extension of 
the Deer Island outfall, authorized by chapter 344 of the Acts of 1914. 

The progress of this work will be controlled largely by the weather 
conditions at this exposed headland, but with a favorable season it is 
probable that the new outlet will be ready for service before the end 
of the year, and a substantial even if not complete relief will be ob- 
tained from the increasingly offensive discharge of sewage at this 
point. The success which has been obtained at the deep water out- 
lets for sewage near Peddock's Island gives assurance of equally good 
results here. 

The Board was directed by chapter 215 of the Acts of 1915 to 
lower the Metropolitan sewerage siphon under Maiden River so as 
to dredge a river channel of greater depth than is possible with 
the sewer at its present level. 

After consultation with the Port Directors it was decided to lower 
the siphon to a level which would make possible a channel 20 feet 
deep. Work is under way and will be completed this season. 

(2) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 

The cost of the maintenance and operation of the North Metropol- 
itan System during the past year was $174,123.78. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the North Metropolitan System now 
extend a distance of 63.691 miles, and the local sewers which are 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



25 



connected with the Metropolitan sewers have a further length of 
743.35 miles, involving 80,748 connections. 

The sewage of the North Metropolitan District flows at first by 
gravity, but before being finally disposed of is lifted at different 
points by pumping and is finally discharged into the harbor from an 
outfall off Deer Island. 

The daily average amount of sewage discharged into the harbor was 
60,392,000 gallons, a daily average for each person contributing sew- 
age of 111 gallons. The increase in the total amount of sewage dis- 
charged was 1,692,000 gallons per day more than the discharge of the 
preceding year. The maximum rate of discharge in any one day was 
151,600,000 gallons. 

The pumping stations operated for the North Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift 
(Feet). 



Deer Island station (Boston harbor), 
East Boston station, . 

Charlestown station 

Alewife Brook station (Somerville), . 



235,000,000 
235,000,000 

104,000,000 

22,000,000 



19 

19 

11 

8 

13 



There were purchased for the operation of the pumping stations 
7,067 tons of bituminous coal, the average prices of which, at the 
different stations, varied from $4.00 to $5.08 per gross ton delivered 
in the bins. 

The amount expended for the stations was $101,604.06. The 
average cost per million gallons of sewage lifted per foot at the sev- 
eral stations, was $0,135, a decrease of about 7.5 per cent, from the 
cost last year. 



(3) South Metropolitan Sewerage System ■*- Construction. 
The amount expended for construction on account of the South 
Metropolitan System during the past year was $87,961.86. 

The relief outfall at Nut Island is finished and has been put in 
service. This addition provides a sufficient outfall for all the sewage 
and storm waters which can reach this station for many years. 



26 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The town of Wellesley was admitted to the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage District by chapter 343 of the Acts of 1914, and the act 
was accepted by the town in March, 1915. 

The necessary surveys were at once undertaken and as soon as 
possible contracts were awarded for four sections out of the nine 
into which the sewer was divided. At the end of the year two of 
these sections are practically completed. Great difficulties were 
met in the construction of the upper section from the presence in 
the lower levels of the trench of a sand finer than any hitherto found 
in any of the works carried on under the direction of this Board. 

The five remaining sections of this sewer will be placed under con- 
tract at a date early enough to permit the completion of the whole 
line down to the connection with the main sewer in West Roxbury 
in the season of 1917. 

The Board acquired by taking, during the year, easements in 
3.011 acres of land in Needham and Wellesley for the construction 
of the Wellesley Extension of the High-level sewer. 

(4) South Metkopolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 

The entire cost of maintenance of the South Metropolitan System 
during the past year was $108,865.70. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the South Metropolitan System, which 
comprise the old Charles River valley sewer and Neponset River 
valley sewer, as well as the new High-level sewer and extensions, 
have a total length of 45.139 miles, and with these are connected 
local sewers having a length of 627.61 miles, involving 42,091 connec- 
tions. 

The pumping stations operated for the South Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift 
(Feet). 



Ward Street station (Roxbury District), 
Quincy station, ..... 
Quincy sewerage lifting station, 



100,000,000 

18,000,000 

3,000,000 



45 
28 
20 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 27 

The sewage of two small districts in Dorchester and Milton, in- 
cluded in the Neponset River valley system, which are too low for 
sewage to be delivered into the High-level sewer by gravity, is, under 
an arrangement with the city of Boston, disposed of through the 
Boston Main Drainage Works at Moon Island. By this arrangement 
the Board is relieved from the expense of providing extra pumping 
facilities. 

A large part of the sewage of the District is lifted into the High- 
level sewer at the Ward Street pumping station in Roxbury. Most 
of the sewage of the city of Quincy is pumped into the High-level 
sewer at Greenleaf Street near the Quincy pumping station. The 
entire sewage is screened at the Nut Island screen-house for the 
purpose of intercepting solid matter, and is thence discharged at 
the bottom of the harbor from the outfalls about a mile off the 
island. 

The daily average amount of sewage thus discharged was 52,300,- 
000 gallons, and the largest rate of discharge in a single day was dur- 
ing a heavy storm, when the amount reached 155,000,000 gallons. 
The decrease in the daily average from last year was 300,000 gallons. 
The daily average discharge of sewage for each individual contrib- 
uting sewage in the district was 174 gallons. 

There were 3,237 gross tons of bituminous coal purchased at the 
two pumping stations and screen-house, the average prices of which 
varied from $4.37 to $4.89 per gross ton delivered in the bins. 

The total amount expended for the operation of the stations was 
$63,103.18. 

VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for the fiscal year of the Commonwealth ending with November 
30, 1915, was, as stated in connection with the Water Works, pre- 
sented to the General Court in January, in accordance with the 
requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is in part printed as Appendix No. 6. 

The following statement of its financial doings, in relation to the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works, for the calendar year 1915, is herewith 
presented, in accordance with the provisions of the act of 1906, as a 
part of the annual report of the Board. 



28 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub! Doc. 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments. 
The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, the expenditures for construction, and the balances 
available on January 1, 1916, have been as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under various acts prior to 1915 for the con- 
struction of the North Metropolitan System and the various 

extensions, $7,144,365 73 

Loans authorized under Acts of 1915: — 

Chapter 215 (Maiden River Siphon, Section 19), . . . 70,000 00 
Balance from Chapter 775, Acts of 1914 (applied to North 

Metropolitan Loan Fund under Resolve 76, Acts of 1915), 13,000 00 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources 

which are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan 

System: — 

For the year ending December 31, 1915, . . $153 27 

For the period prior to January 1, 1915, . . 85,363 52 

85,516 79 



$7,312,882 52 
Amount approved for payment by the Board l out of the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System: — 
For the year ending December 31, 1915, . . $34,308 85 
For the period prior to January 1, 1915, . 7,091,329 10 



7,125,637 95 



Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1916, . $187,244 57 



South Metropolitan System. 

'Loans authorized under the various acts, prior to 1915, applied to 
the construction of the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset 
valley sewer, High-level sewer and extensions, constituting the 

South Metropolitan System, $8,867,046 27 

Loans authorized under Acts of 1915: — 

Chapter 343 (Wellesley extension), 350,000 00 

Chapter 210 (additional for completion of Relief Outfall, Sec- 
tion 43), . .. . . . . 5,000 00 

Amount carried forward, . . . ... . . . $9,222,046 27 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 29 

Amount brought forward, $9,222,046 27 

Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscella- 
neous sources, which are placed to the credit of the South Met- 
ropolitan System: — 
For the year ending December 31, 1915, . . $4,978 13 
For the period prior to January 1, 1915, . . 14,092 01 

19,070 14 



$9,241,116 41 
Amount approved by the Board for payment out of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South System: — 

On account of the Charles River valley sewer, $800,046 27 
On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . 911,531 46 
On account of the High-level sewer and ex- 
tensions, including Wellesley extension: — 
For the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1915, .... $87,961 86 
For the period prior to Jan- 
uary 1, 1915, . . . 7,144,058 55 

— - 7,232,020 41 

: 8,943,598 14 



Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1916, . $297,518 27 



(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1915. 

North Metropolitan System. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: — 

Sinking fund bonds (3^ and 3 per cent.), .... $6,563,000 00 
Serial bonds (3£ and 4 per cent.), 570,500 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1915, .... $7,133,500 00 
Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1915, . . $16,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1915, 13,000 00 

29,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1915, . . $7,104,500 00 

Gross Sewerage Debt, $7,104,500 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1915, 2,095,509 86 

Net Sewerage Debt December 31, 1915, $5,008,990 14 

A decrease for the year of $55,517.56. 



30 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: — 
Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3§ per cent.), . 
Serial bonds, . . . . . . . 



5,877,912 00 



Total bond issue to December 31, 1915, 



. $8,877,912 00 



Gross Sewerage Debt, . . . . . - . . \ . .$8,877,912 00 
Sinking fund December 31, 1915, 1,195,469 60 



Net Sewerage Debt December 31, 1915, . 
A decrease for the year of $106,449.46. 



. $7,682,442 40 



(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, 

December 31, 1915. 



Year. 




Loans. 


Bonds issued 
(Sinking Fund). 


Bonds 

ISSUED 

(Serial 
Bonds). 


Sinking 
Fund. 




North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 

System. 


South 
System. 


North 
System. 


North and 
South 

Systems. 


1889, . 

1890, . 

1891, . 

1892, . 

1893, . 
1894, . 

1895, . 

1896, . 

1897, . 

1898, . 

1899, . 

1900, . 

1901, . 

1902, . 

1903, . 

1904, . 

1905, . 

1906, . 

1907, . 

1908, . 

1909, . 

1910, . 

1911, . 

1912, . 

1913, . 

1914, . 

1915, . 






$5,000,000 00 

500,000 00 

300,000 00 

30,000 00 

85,000 00 

215,000 00 

265,000 00 

500,000 00 

55,000 00 

413,000 00 

56,000 00 

6,000 00 

378,000 00 

130,500 00 
83,000 00 


$500,000 00 

300,000 00 

35,000 00 

4,625,000 00 

10,912 00i 

40,000 00 

1,000,000 00 
392,000 00 

1,175,000 00 


$2,200,000 

368,000 

1,053,000 

579,000 

500,000 

300,000 

30,000 

80,000 

220,000 

265,000 

500,000 

55,000 

300,000 
113,000 


$800,000 

300,000 

200,000 

300,000 

35,000 

1,025,000 
10,912 

2,040,000 
864,000 

1,736,000 
392,000 

175,000 
300,000 
700,000 


$62,000 
378,000 

130,500 


$361,416 59 

454,520 57 

545,668 26 

636,084 04 

754,690 41 

878,557 12 

1,008,724 95 

1,146,998 68 

1,306,850 30 

1,492,418 98 

1,673,784 40 

1,931,741 89 

2,184,674 98 

2,458,541 20 

2,749,337 90 

3,011,512 44 

3,290„979 46 




$8,016,500 002 
789,134 27 


$8,432,912 00 
789,134 27 


_ 


_ 


_ 










$7,227,365 73 


$9,222,046 27 


$6,563,000 


$8,877,912 


$570,500 





1 The sum of $10,912 was appropriated to reimburse the town of Watertown for the expense of con- 
structing the Watertown siphon. 

2 Of this amount $789,134.27 was expended for the construction of the Charles River valley sewer, which 
is now included in the South Metropolitan System. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 31 



(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1915, were as follows: — 

* 

North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriations as follows : — 

Chapter 157, Acts of 1915, . . . . $185,500 00 

Chapter 775, Acts of 1914 (balance), . . . . . 10,569 06 

Chapter 369, Acts of 1915, 500 00 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, .... 559 53 



$197,128 59 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, .... 174,123 78 



Balance, January 1, 1916, $23,004 81 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriations as follows : — 

Chapter 156, Acts of 1915, $117,855 00 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, . . . . 152 33 



$118,007 33 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, .... 108,865 70 

Balance, January 1, 1916, $9,141 63 



(5) Sewer Assessments, 1915. 

The following sewer assessments were made by the Treasurer of 
the Commonwealth upon the various municipalities : — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, . - $99,454 95 

Serial bonds, 11,976 25 

Interest, 222,216 08 

Maintenance : — 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $186,000 00 

Less balance on hand, 757 31 

185,242 69 

Total North Metropolitan sewerage assessment, . . $518,889 97 



32 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, . . ... . $64,833 80 

Interest, ' ' . 303,010 70 

Maintenance: — 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $117,855 00 

Less balance on hand, 2,772 69 

115,082 31 



Total South Metropolitan sewerage assessment, . 



$482,926 81 



In accordance with the provisions of chapter 369, Acts of 1906, 
the proportion to be paid by each city and town to meet the interest 
and sinking fund requirements for each year is based upon their 
respective taxable valuations, and to meet the cost of maintenance 
and operation upon their respective populations. 

The divisions of the assessments for 1915 were as follows: — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. . 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Arlington, 

Maiden, 


$14,540 81 

8,236 13 

86,677 78 

112,675 22 

28,934 81 

30,906 79 

4,777 67 

42,700 65 

25,704 21 


Wakefield 

Total, 


$17,201 57 
18,557 84 
70,682 61 
5,770 53 
10,878 06 
13,807 21 
13,803 31 
13,034 77 


Medford, 


$518,889 97 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 




$223,686 57 
92,550 90 
11,116 98 
22,144 92 
61,233 44 


Total, 


$30,403 10 
26,729 75 
15,061 15 




$482,926 81 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



33 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition op Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



North Metropolitan System. 
North System, enlargement: — 

Administration, 

East Boston pumping station, extensions and additions, .... 

New Mystic sewer, . . 

Section 48A, Somerville and Medford 

Section 57A, Revere extension, 

Deer Island Outfall extension, 

Maiden River siphon, Section 19 

Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1915, 
Total for North Metropolitan System to January 1, 1916, 

South Metropolitan System. 

High-level sewer, 

High-level sewer extensions: — 

Administration, 

Relief Outfall, Section 43, 

Wellesley extension : — 

Section 98 . . . 619 04 

Section 99 199 84 

Section 100, 427 32 

Section 101, . . . . . 136 23 

Section 102 363 52 

Section 103 1,960 77 

Section 104 2,460 90 

Section 105, - . 30,896 56 

Section 106 20,092 96 

Legal, etc., . . 56 50 



$5,281 43 




42 75 




15,572 22 




1 04 




1,191 56 




10,843 62 




1,376 23 






$34,308 85 






7,091,329 10 


$7,125,637 95 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1915, 
Total for South Metropolitan System to January 1, 1916, 
Total for construction, both systems, . 



$5,792 45 



$757 55 
24,198 22 



57,213 64 



82,169 41 



$87,961 86 
8,855,636 28 

$8,943,598 14 

$16,069,236 09 



Maintenance and Operation. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 


North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 


$174,123 78 
108,865 70 




$282,989 48 



34 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, re- 
ceipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 1915: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Construction op Works and Acquisition bt Purchase or Taking. 
North System Enlargement. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, . . 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, . 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, . . 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 
Rent and taxes, main office, 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 

G. M. Bryne Co., Contract 112, for constructing Section 57A of the Revere 
extension in Chelsea and Revere 

Henry Spinach Contracting Co., Contract 110, for constructing part of Sec- 
tion 69 (New Mystic sewer) in Winchester, 

Henry Spinach Contracting Co., Contract 111, for constructing part of Sec- 
tion 69 (New Mystic sewer) in Winchester 

George M. Bryne, Contract 131, for constructing Section 1A, Deer Island 
Outfall extension of the North Metropolitan System at Deer Island in 
Boston Harbor, 

Real estate: — 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 

Settlements, . 

Total for North Metropolitan System, . . . . ' . . " . 



$2,108 32 
750 00 
1,574 77 
441 09 
217 88 
189 37 



$406 25 


1,528 37 


263 89 


172 48 


30 70 


2 77 


653 80 


568 13 


338 55 


$150 81 


4,121 84 


412 93 


1,569 80 



$158 18 
5,677 97 
9,619 48 

2,354 50 



$121 97 
875 00 



$5,281 43 



3,964 94 



6,255 38 



17,810 13 



996 97 



$34,308 85 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



South Metropolitan System. 
High-level Sewer, 
Engineering: — 

Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others 

Postage, telephone and telegrams, 

Repairs, fittings and supplies, main office 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies, 

Contracts: — 

Charles A. Haskin, Contract 122, for constructing Siphon Crossing under 

Section 70 of the High-level sewer in West Roxbury, .... 

E. W. Everson & Son, Contract 14, for constructing Section 75 (in part) of 

the High-level sewer in Roxbury, 



High-level Sewer Extensions. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Clerks and stenographers, . .' . . 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, . 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, 

Traveling expenses, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . . 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 
W. H. Ellis & Son Co., Contract 120, for constructing part of Section 43, 

Relief Outfall line of the High-level sewer in Boston Harbor, 
Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., Contract 123, for constructing Section 106 of 

the High-level sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham and Wellesley, 
Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., Contract 124, for constructing Section 105 of 

the High-level sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham, 

Real estate: — 
Legal, conveyancing and expert, 



Total for South Metropolitan System, 



$184 96 
14 10 
17 69 
75 70 



$4,500 00 
1,000 00 



$308 34 

310 80 

81 92 

31 25 

25 24 



$718 75 

7,498 72 

1,966 67 

599 51 

130 53 

331 66 

62 49 

93 79 

75 75 

869 36 



$197 38 
4,286 76 
1,078 17 
2,691 76 



$20,469 10 
14,994 21 
25,290 75 



$292 45 



5,500 00 



$5,792 45 



757 55 



12,347 23 



8,254 07 



60,754 06 

56 50 

$87,961 86 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Maintenance and Operation of Works 
North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, ...... 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, . 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, 

Kent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, ....... 

Deer Island pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, .... 

East Boston pumping station: — 

Labor » 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, .... 

Charlestown pumping station: — 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$2,250 00 


2,530 49 


202 00 


218 12 


20 00 


546 05 


30 93 


1 78 


38 97 


f\ 93S 94 




$7,037 25 


606 00 


654 39 


10 00 


257 25 


92 80 


150 00 


12 50 


O OO'l 10, 




$19,860 38 


8,396 07 


640 12 


1,557 60 


97 65 


1,424 71 


18 15 


369 65 


537 52 


, , qo nni qe 




$20,358 02 


10,696 67 


468 39 


1,656 00 


55 30 


681 47 


8 57 


242 39 


520 79 


34 fiS7 fiO 




$17,001 52 


4,359 49 


210 02 


541 20 



5,112 23 $82,247 98 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



37 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Amounts brought forward, 

North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Charlestown pumping station — Con. 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, . . 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Alewife Brook pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, ' 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Engineering assistants . 

Labor, 

Automobiles, 

Brick, cement and lime, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, . . 

Freight, express and teaming, 

Fuel and lighting, 

Jobbing and repairing, 

Lumber • . 

Machinery, tools and appliances, 

Paints and oils, 

Rubber and oiled goods, . . . . . . . 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Restoration East Boston screen-house (chapter 775, Acts of 1914): — 

Engineering, 

Labor 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement and othei supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 
J. Caddigan Co., Contract 121, for building new screen-house at East 

Boston pumping station, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Total for North Metropolitan System, 



},112 23 $82,247 98 



69 25 




626 39 




42 99 




101 45 




345 88 






23,298 19 




$8,541 99 




1,493 59 




194 31 




148 92 




10 40 




167 17 




29 21 




38 63 




92 20 






10,716 42 




$3,000 00 




32,944 90 




855 30 




443 94 




421 68 




1 03 




56 58 




289 23 




1,114 19 




702 74 




404 13 




158 34 




230 25 




31 95 




572 39 




903 07 




148 48 






42,278 2U 






4,390 79 


$529 50 




923 90 




472 91 




761 08 






2,687 39 






2,974 37 




5,530 44 


$174,123 78 



38 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Genekal Chakacter op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, . . . 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Telephones, . . 

Traveling expenses, . . . . . 
Miscellaneous expenses 

General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, . . . 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of buildings, 
Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Ward Street pumping station: — 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Quincy pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, . . . . . 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, . . . . . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Nut Island screen-house: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Amounts carried forward, . . . 



$2,041 67 

2,419 82 

189 37 

187 26 

60 00 

593 68 

27 40 

5 00 

33 31 



$4,553 27 

568 13 

561 86 

279 11 

82 20 

78 82 

14 80 



$23,339 57 

11,203 08 

219 39 

1,470 00 

89 59 

3,044 03 

52 87 

857 91 

298 25 



58,384 43 

1,622 98 

62 75 

208 58 

54 63 

235 35 

26 36 

283 48 

30 47 



58,832 58 

1,650 47 

84 18 

324 93 

10 55 

109 22 



$5,557 51 



6,138 19 



40,574 69 



10,909 03 



$11,011 93 



5,179 42 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



39 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



Amounts brought forward, . 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 
Nut Island screen-house — Con. 

Telephones, 

General supplies, . . . . , 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Engineering assistants, 

Labor, 

Automobiles, . . . . 

Brick, cement and lime, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, . . . . 

Fuel and lighting, 

Jobbing and repairing 

Lumber, . 

Machinery, tools and appliances, 

Paints and oils 

Rubber and oiled goods, ...... 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, ; 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

City of Boston, for pumping and interest, . . 
Horses, vehicles and stable account, . 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



$11,011 93 $63,179 42 



65 76 




476 09 




65 68 






11,619 46 




$3,387 50 




18,423 24 




945 65 


- 


52 80 




59 56 




81 38 




22 01 




417 63 




194 40 




35 26 




80 73 




13 20 




48 55 




434 85 




243 25 




92 32 






24,532 33 






6,423 73 




3,110 76 




$108,865 70 



(6) Receipts. 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows : — 



Account. 



For the 

Year ending 

December 31, 

1915. 



Construction: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 

Maintenance: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1915, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1916, .... 



$153 27 
4,978 13 

559 53 
152 33 



$5,843 26 
120,885 01 



$126,728 27 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(c) Assets. 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; completed works, real estate connected 
therewith. 

(d) Liabilities. 
There are bills for current expenses which have not yet been 
received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


High-level sewer: — 






National Contracting Co., 


Section 73, Contract abandoned, .... 


$5,516 17i 


High-level sewer extensions: — 






Timothy J. O'Connell, . 


Section 82, in part, Contract 57, . 


60 00 


W. H. Ellis & Son Co 


Section 43, in part, Relief Outfall line.Contract 120, 


5,255 85 


Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., . 


Contract 123, Section 106, Wellesley extension, 


2,646 04 


Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., . 


Contract 124, Section 105, Wellesley extension, 


4,463 07 


North System enlargement: — 






George M. Bryne, .... 


Contract 131, Section 1A, Deer Island Outfall ex- 


415 15 



1 Damages claimed by the Commonwealth on account of the abandonment of the contract exceed 
this amount. 



Claims have been made by the following parties for land taken and 
other damages, and suits are now pending in the courts for the de- 
termination of many of them: — 

Anna L. Dunican, Carrie S. Urquhart, N. Jefferson Urquhart, 
Edwin N. Urquhart, Richard Jones, James Doherty, Michael Niland, 
William H. Gibbons, Francis Normile, Boston & Maine Railroad, 
Isabella P. Shaw, Arthur W. Pope, F. Murray Forbes, Hugh D. 
Scott, Mabel H. Foster, Walker-Gordon Laboratory Co. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 41 



VIII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

In the abstract of the annual report for the year 1915 the Board 
made the following statement and recommendations : — 

The question of the disposal of the electric energy developed at the Wachusett 
power plant after October 1, 1916, when the existing contract expires, should 
receive early attention, as it is possible that it may be for the best interests of the 
Metropolitan Water District to connect the Wachusett and Sudbury power 
plants by a transmission line. 

This arrangement would increase the reliability of the service, and if a contract 
for the disposal of the energy is made early in the year, so as to allow time for the 
construction of the transmission line before October 1, the energy could be sold 
for delivery at either the Wachusett power plant in Clinton or at the Sudbury 
power plant in Southborough, as may be found to be most desirable. 

The transmission line would be about 15^ miles in length, and could be located 
on the Wachusett Aqueduct and Sudbury Reservoir lands for the entire distance, 
with the exception of crossings over highways and railroads. An alternative 
location over private lands for a distance of 900 feet would be more desirable 
from a construction standpoint, provided satisfactory arrangements can be made 
for the acquisition of the rights required. 

The estimated cost of a two-circuit underground cable line for a distance of 700 
feet from the Wachusett power station and a one-circuit overhead transmission 
line on expanded steel truss poles for the remainder of the distance is $60,000. 

To provide for the satisfactory operation of the Weston Aqueduct supply 
mains when the Sudbury pow T er plant is put into operation, some additional 
valves and connections should be installed between these mains and the low- 
service mains at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in Brighton and at Coolidge Corner in 
Brookline, and some of the meters on the mains in Brookline, which were ac- 
quired from the City of Boston, should be relocated at the Boston boundary line. 

With the present arrangement of the meters on the low-service mains in Brook- 
line and Somerville, which were recently acquired from the City of Boston, the 
city is charged with any leakage which may be taking place from these mains, 
which are now the property of the Board, and in order to remedy this condition 
it will be necessary to relocate all of the meters at the Boston boundary line. 

The estimated cost of making these connections and relocating all of the meters 
is $35,000. 

The service furnished to the higher portions of Hyde Park and Milton through 
the existing 12-inch main has not been entirely satisfactory at times during the 
past year, because of the interruption of the regular service due to the use in 
common by the Boston Water Department and this department of the section 
of the line about 2,200 feet in length, located in Poplar Street, West Roxbury, 
which belongs to the City of Boston, and to a leak which occurred in the single 
line of flexible jointed pipe under the Neponset River, which required ten days 
for repairs. During this period the supply was maintained through the city of 



42 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Boston pipes by pumping to its standpipe on Fairmount in Hyde Park. The 
disposal of this standpipe and the reservoir at its base has been under considera- 
tion by the city, and if the standpipe should be abandoned, a second pipe line 
should be laid in Poplar Street, West Roxbury, and under the Neponset River, 
to insure a reliable service for the Milton and Hyde Park extra high-service 
district. 

The estimated cost of laying a separate 12-inch pipe line for the department in 
Poplar Street and another flexible jointed 12-inch pipe line under the Neponset 
River is $7,000. 

When the northern extra high-service supply was introduced into Arlington in 
1899, the town granted this department the right to use in common with the town 
of Arlington the water pipes belonging to the town, so far as necessary, for the 
purpose of conveying water into the standpipe and to the town of Lexington. 
Satisfactory service is not now furnished by the use of the Arlington mains in 
common, and it seems desirable to lay a 16-inch Metropolitan Water Works main 
from the standpipe to the Lexington boundary line, a distance of about 6,000 feet, 
during the present year, provided the pipe can be purchased at a reasonable price. 

When the new Arlington pumping station was built in 1907 an Allis-Chalmers 
high-duty, horizontal cross-compound fly-wheel type pumping engine, having a 
capacity of 1,500,000 gallons per day, was installed for regular service, and a low- 
duty, horizontal, duplex-compound, direct acting Blake & Knowles pumping 
engine, having a capacity of 1,500,000 gallons per day, was installed for emergency 
service. 

During the hot, dry weather in summer the consumption of the northern extra 
high-service district is at the rate of over 2,500,000 gallons per day at times, and 
satisfactory service cannot be furnished by the present equipment because of the 
large amount of steam .required co operate the Blake pump and the numerous 
complaints received when this pump is in operation, of water hammer in the pipe 
lines. If the Allis engine should be out of service for any reason during this season 
of maximum consumption, the supply could not be maintained with the Blake 
pump. Under these conditions it seems to be desirable to provide for the removal 
of the Blake pump and the installation of a new pumping engine at this station. 

The estimated cost of these improvements is $48,000, of which about one-half 
is for the pipe line. 

There is a balance of $196,000 now remaining from the appropriation of 
$600,000 authorized by chapter 694 of the Acts of 1912 for the purchase of certain 
property from the City of Boston, and it is recommended that authority be given 
to issue bonds under this appropriation from time to time as may be required for 
the above projects to a total amount not exceeding $150,000, subdivided as 
follows: — 

Transmission line, Wachusett power station to Sudbury power 

station, . . ...... . ■ . . . . . . . $60,000 00 

Connections and relocations of meters for Low Service district, . 35,000 00 

Improvements in Southern Extra High Service pipe line, . . 7,000 00 

Improvements in Northern Extra High Service works, . . . 48,000 00 

$150,000 00 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 43 

When the City of Boston took Cochituate Lake as a water supply it also ac- 
quired the outlet to Dudley Pond, containing 1 acre and 30 rods, and took posses- 
sion of its waters. This pond lies in a northeasterly direction from the northern 
division of the lake, and contains 81 acres at an elevation of about 12 feet above 
the lake. 

The waters of this lake when first taken were pure and soft, and the pond was 
connected with the lake in the year 1861, thirteen years after the introduction of 
water into the city of Boston. For a number of years the territory about this 
pond was unoccupied, and there was no probable pollution of its waters from 
human habitation. Inasmuch as the city owned nothing but a small portion of 
land immediately about the outlet of the pond, it had no means of protecting 
itself against the occupation of its shores. The attractive nature of the pond has 
in recent years brought many summer residents, who have established them- 
selves in some cases upon the very margin of the pond. It will only now be 
possible to avoid the dangers of pollution from household waste by very extensive 
purchases of land and houses, which the value of the waters of this small pond 
does not in the opinion of the Board justify. The waters of this pond have not 
been used for a number of years, and the Board is of the opinion that it will not 
be safe in the future to use this as a source of domestic water supply. 

The Board, therefore, recommends that this pond be detached from the Met- 
ropolitan Water Supply and restored to its original condition. 

The pumping plant at the Ward Street Sewerage Pumping Station has been in 
operation over ten years, and both engines and boilers are beginning to show the 
results of service. The pumping engines each have a capacity of about 50,000,000 
gallons per day. In flood periods it is necessary to run both of the engines. On 
account of this condition it is necessary that both of these engines shall always 
be kept in condition for immediate use. This so far has been successfully ac- 
complished as all repairs have been made in such manner that the engine has 
been left in condition for service for the night shift, if necessary. 

The most important repairs so far on these engines have been in the valves, 
but the moving parts, such as main bearings and other heavy parts, have never 
been repaired and probably soon will need attention. In such case it would be 
impossible to make these repairs in such manner as to keep the two engines in 
readiness for service. 

At the time of the erection of this plant, foundations were prepared for a third 
engine of the same type. These engines cost about $225,000, including boilers. 
The boiler plant probably had a cost of about $25,000, so that these engines alone 
cost in the neighborhood of $100,000 each. 

Since the completion of this station the steam turbine engine has been greatly 
improved, and there are numerous turbine driven centrifugal pumps in use which 
are giving satisfactory service. The foundation already constructed at this plant 
would be entirely suitable for the installation of such a turbine driven pump. 

Several plants of this type have been examined, and it is believed that such a 
pump would be satisfactory for our needs. It is estimated that one could be 
installed at this station for about $20,000, not including piping. While the cen- 
trifugal pump is not as efficient and economical as the high-duty pumps in service 
at this station, yet there is much to be said on the side of the centrifugal for 



44 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

pumping sewage. At present there is a large expenditure for valve repairs which 
would be entirely eliminated on the other type; also oil, packing and other sup- 
plies would be very much less. 

The boilers in this station, of which there are four, are of the Dean type, 
vertical, internally fired. The service of the station requires that at least two of 
these boilers should be in continuous operation, leaving a duplication under 
ordinary circumstances. After ten years of service, however, these boilers are 
showing signs of wear, and there have been several times when repairs have been 
going on in two of these boilers, leaving at such a time no duplication whatever. 

The Board recommends that two additional boilers of the same type as those 
existing should be added to the plant. These will cost about $12,000, exclusive 
of piping. It is believed that $40,000 would be a sufficient sum to cover the ex- 
pense of the installation of such additions as are necessary at the Ward Street 
Pumping Station, and it is recommended that authority be given to issue Sewer- 
age Loan bonds to the amount of $40,000 for that purpose. 

The detailed reports of the Acting Chief Engineer of the Water 
Works and of the Engineer of the Sewerage Works, with various 
tables and statistics, are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

henry p. walcott, 
edward a. Mclaughlin, 
thomas e. dwyer, 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 
Boston, February 26, 1916. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF WATER WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit the annual report of 
the work done under the direction of the Chief Engineer of Water 
Works in connection with the construction, maintenance and oper- 
ation of the Metropolitan Water Works for the year ended Decem- 
ber 31, 1915. 

Organization. 

Since the death of Mr. Dexter Brackett, Chief Engineer, on 
August 26, the work has been under the direction of the Acting 
Chief Engineer, with principal assistants as follows:- — 



Elliot R. B. Allardice, 
Charles E. Haberstroh, 
Samuel E. Killam, . 
Arthur E. O'Neil, . 
Alfred 0. Doane, 



Burdett C. Thayer, 
William W. Locke, . 
Clifford Foss, . 

Benjamin F. Hancox, 
James W. Killam, . 

William E. Whittaker, 
Charles E. Livermore, 



Superintendent of Wachusett Depart- 
ment. 

Superintendent of Sudbury Depart- 
ment. 

Superintendent of Distribution Pipe 
Lines and Reservoirs. 

Superintendent of Distribution Pump- 
ing Stations. 
Division Engineer, in charge of Me- 
chanical Engineering and Inspection 
Work. 

Chief Electrician. 

Sanitary Inspector. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of Con- 
struction Work. 

Assistant in charge of Drafting. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of Coal 
and Oil Testing. 

Office Assistant. 

Biologist. 



Including these principal assistants the number of supervising, 
engineering and clerical employees has averaged 51 during the year. 



46 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



In addition to the above force the number of employees engaged 
in maintaining and operating the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, 
power plant and pumping stations and doing minor construction 
work has been as follows: — 



Department. 


Beginning 
of Year. 


End of 

Year. 


Maximum. 


Average. 


Distribution, pipe lines and reservoirs, 
Distribution, pumping stations, .... 


42 
55 
82 
57 


45 
58 
80 
55 


73 

65 

109 

56 


55 
58 
88 
55 




236 


238 


303 


256 



CONSTRUCTION. 
Water Pipe Tunnel under Chelsea Creek. 

The construction of a 42-inch cast-iron water main, by tunnelling 
under Chelsea Creek between Chelsea and East Boston, to provide 
for the deepening of the ship channel by the United States Govern- 
ment, was almost completed at the close of last year under a con- 
tract with Coleman Brothers, of Chelsea. The connections with 
existing pipe lines on the shores of the creek having been completed, 
the new pipe line was put into service on January 9. It replaces two 
24-inch flexible-joint pipe lines, one laid in 1870 by the city of 
Boston and the other in 1900 by this department, which were 
formerly used for supplying water to the East Boston low-service 
district. 

The old pipe lines, which were buried about five feet below the 
bottom of the channel, were removed without excavating a trench, 
by pulling them up in sections with a large wrecking lighter equipped 
with a derrick having a boom 95 feet in length. The sections usually 
included two or three pipes but on one occasion seven pipes were 
pulled up at one lift. The derrick sling was placed around the pipes 
by a diver who made the necessary excavation for this purpose with 
a jet of water supplied from a pump on the lighter. 

The entire work of constructing the new line and removing the old 
lines was completed February 20. The total expenditure for this 
work is $80,487.33, of which $25,257.67 was expended during the 
year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 47 



Additional 24-inch Main from Dorchester Lower Mills to 

Quincy. 

The work of laying a second 24-inch cast-iron southern high -service 
main about 13,000 feet in length from Dorchester Lower Mills through 
Washington Street, and Adams Street, Milton, to Quincy, to reinforce 
the 24-inch main laid in 1897 and 1898 was resumed on April 16 under 
the contract with John J. Evans of Lawrence. Work was completed 
on August 5 under this contract, which included all of the pipe line 
with the exception of the crossings over the Neponset River and the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 

At both of these crossings steel pipes were used instead of cast iron 
as it was desirable to reduce the weight of the pipe line and the 
space occupied as much as possible so that the pipe line could be 
supported by the existing bridges. 

It was originally planned to connect the new 24-inch pipe line with 
the Metropolitan Water Works 36-inch main at the junction of 
Morton and River streets in Dorchester, where the old 24-inch main 
connects, but in order to provide for an emergency supply in case 
of accident to the 36-inch main, the portion of the Boston Water 
Works 36-inch main 461 feet in length, located in Sanford Street 
between Morton Street, where it connects with the Metropolitan 
Water Works 36-inch main, and Washington Street, where a supply 
could be obtained from the Boston mains, was purchased from the 
city of Boston August 3 for $4,216.62. The new 24-inch main was 
then laid from the junction of River and Washington streets, through 
Washington Street to Sanford Street and connected with the 36-inch 
main purchased from the city, instead of through River Street to 
connect with the 36-inch Metropolitan Water Works main in Mor- 
ton Street, as originally planned. 

Under the contract with John J. Evans 2,714 feet of 24-inch pipe 
line has been laid during the year, making a total length of 12,564 
feet laid under this contract. The force employed by the contractor 
averaged about 28 and reached a maximum of 49 men. 

The pipe and specials for the pipe line were delivered to the con- 
tractor and loaded on his wagons by the department force at the 
Norfolk Downs pipe yard, located about 1.6 miles from the pipe line. 

The expenditures for the work done during the year amount to 
$7,013.39, making a total of $20,795.62 under this contract. 



48 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The 24-inch steel pipe line at the crossing over the Neponset River 
is 134 feet in length, is located below the floor of the highway bridge 
and is supported at the ends by the bridge abutments and at four in- 
termediate points by steel I beams which are supported on the bridge 
piers. The construction of the wooden box to protect the pipe from 
frost was in progress at the close of the year. 

At the railroad crossing it was necessary to remove the double line 
of 16-inch cast-iron pipes forming a portion of the existing main, in 
order to obtain space for the two lines of 22-inch steel pipe which 
have been laid beneath the sidewalk of the highway bridge over the 
railroad. The combined lengths of the two lines of steel pipe at this 
crossing, including the 45° elbows at the ends, is 76.6 feet. One line 
replaces the double line of 16-inch pipes which was removed, and the 
other forms a portion of the new main. The bridge abutments form 
the entire supports for these steel pipes, which are enclosed in a tight 
box to protect them from frost and the corrosive action of the smoke 
from the locomotives. The sidewalk planks form the top, the 12- 
inch steel bridge floor beams with wooden stringers on top form the 
sides, and 2-inch wooden plank resting on the bottom flanges of the 
steel beams form the bottom of the pipe box. A temporary 24-inch 
cast-iron pipe line was laid over the railroad bridge to provide for the 
flow of water while the work of laying the steel pipes was in progress. 

Walsh's Holyoke Steam Boiler Works constructed the steel pipes, 
painted them at the shop one coat on the exterior and two coats on 
the interior with genuine red lead and linseed oil paint furnished by 
the department, and laid them in position at the bridges for the sum 
of $850 for the river crossing and $750 for the railroad crossing. 

The pipes are made of open hearth flange steel plates f of an inch 
in thickness and J of an inch diameter rivets, with alternate inside 
and outside courses, double-riveted lap longitudinal seams and single- 
riveted lap girth seams. 

After the pipes were laid and tested the W. L. Waples Company 
for the sum of $79.20 painted the interior and exterior surface with 
one coat of red lead paint furnished by the department. 

For testing the steel pipes caps were bolted on the ends and the 
joints were made with wooden staves to facilitate the removal of the 
caps after the pipes were tested. 

On account of the limited space available in the streets the old 
pipe line was cut at four points and the ends of the sections were 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 49 

connected with sections of the new main by the department forces 
to avoid crossing the lines. As a result, both the easterly and west- 
erly lines now include sections of the old and of the new mains. Both 
lines have been in service since September 13. A connection was 
made with the Milton Water Works mains at Randolph Avenue on 
July 15, and the connection between the 36-inch main purchased 
from the city of Boston and the new 24-inch main was made on 
August 19. Both in Boston and Milton the pipe trenches were re- 
surfaced by the local highway forces by agreement. Including the 
work done in 1914 and in 1915 the cost of the resurfacing is $926.24 
or $0.70 per linear foot in Boston, and $2,778.87 or $0.26 per linear 
foot in Milton. 

The total expenditure for the new 24-inch main is $77,498.76, of 
which $29,131.45 was expended during the year. 

Extension of 20-inch Force Main in West Roxbury. 

The extension of the southern extra high-service 20-inch force main 
from the junction of Beech and Poplar streets to the Bellevue Reser- 
voir in West Roxbury, which was laid in 1914, was tested and was 
put into service January 28. The total expenditures on account of 
this extension amount to $23,386.79, of which $1,460.46 was ex- 
pended during the year. 

Bellevue Reservoir. 

Steel Tank. 

The construction of the concrete foundation and erection of the 
steel tank for the southern extra high-service reservoir on Bellevue 
Hill in West Roxbury were completed in 1914. The steel tank, which 
is 100 feet in diameter and 44 feet 3 inches in height and has a 
capacity of 2,500,000 gallons, was filled with water to a depth of 6 
inches above the crest of the overflow weir and tested for leakage on 
January 9. The water was then drawn out and a number of cracked 
and leaky rivets were replaced. This work was completed on Jan- 
uary 22, and as the weather conditions were then unfavorable for 
sand blasting and painting the steel, the tank was again filled and 
put into service. On March 25 the tank was taken out of service 
and drained and the work of sand blasting and painting the steel was 
begun March 30 by the W. L. Waples Company of Boston, sub- 



50 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

contractor for this work. The plant used consisted at first of a 20- 
horse power, gasoline engine driven air compressor, a compressed air 
reservoir, two lines of air hose and two nozzles. Sand blasting was 
stopped in the latter part of the afternoon of each day and the 
cleaned surfaces were painted before rusting commenced. The force 
employed included 1 foreman, 2 painters, who also did sand blasting, 
and 1 helper. This force could sand blast and paint an area of 
about 330 square feet per day. Later, in order to increase the rate 
of progress, a second compressor, operated by an automobile engine, 
was installed on April 19. The entire inside and outside surface of 
the tank, having an area of 35,650 square feet, was sand blasted and 
painted. Work was completed June 14, with the exception of the 
third coat on the outside, which has been deferred until after the 
masonry tower which encloses the tank is completed. All painting 
materials were furnished by the department, but were mixed by the 
contractor under the direction of the engineer. For the inside of the 
tank National Lead Company's red lead in oil paste, litharge and 
Spencer-Kellogg & Son's boiled linseed oil were used; the first coat 
natural color, the second and third coats tinted with lamp black in 
oil. For the outside of the tank red lead paste, raw linseed oil and 
drier were used for the first coat, and for the second coat white lead, 
raw linseed oil, turpentine and drier tinted with lamp black were 
used. One gallon of red lead paint was sufficient to cover 700 square 
feet of surface with one coat. The sub-contractor's price for ' sand 
blasting and painting the tank was $1,600, of which $50 has been 
reserved until the third coat of paint is applied to the outside of the 
tank. The total expenditure for the steel tank is $16,992.59, of 
which $2,999.94 was expended during the year. 

Masonry Tower. 

A contract for the construction of the masonry tower which en- 
closes the tank and protects the water from frost was made with the 
John Cashman & Sons Company April 23 for the sum of $46,000. 

The tower is 114 feet 2 inches in outside diameter at the base and 
108 feet 2 inches in inside diameter. It is 47 J feet in height from 
the concrete foundation to the top of the cornice. A parapet wall 4 
feet in height above the cornice surrounds the roof. There is a 
central hexagonal turret 70 feet across on the diagonal with a 
pyramidal roof the apex of which is 16 feet above the cornice. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 51 

There are two entrances to the tower. The front entrance faces 
the north and the rear entrance the southeast. The front entrance 
is 9 feet above the base of the tower and the rear entrance on a level 
with the base and opposite the manhole in the steel tank. 

Three feet above the water table there are 11 windows spaced 
equally around the tower, and there are 4 small windows in the 
stairway leading from the front entrance to the roof. Just below the 
cornice, spaced equally around the tower, are 12 groups of 5 windows 
each. 

The tower is of Bay View gray Rockport granite backed with con- 
crete, with the exception of that portion of the tower which extends 
below the surface of the ground, which is entirely of concrete. A 
rough-pointed band course 24 inches in height encircles the tower 
10 feet above the base. Below this band the tower is of rock-face 
coursed ashlar, and above of rock-face broken-range ashlar, with the 
exception of the cap and sill stones of the upper windows and the 
caps and sills of the lower and stairway windows, the upper course 
of the cornice, the coping of the parapet and arch over the front 
entrance, all of which are rough pointed. The lower course of the 
cornice is six-cut work. 

The roof framing consists of steel trusses and beams which are 
supported on the masonry wall and on six steel columns set inside 
the steel tank. The turret roof is of dull green Imperial German 
roofing tiles laid directly on steel purlins. The remainder of the 
roof is of reinforced concrete slabs supported on steel I beams and 
covered with a layer of reinforced Neuchatel asphalte 1 inch in 
thickness. The turret walls are 4 feet 6 inches in height of 4-inch 
x 12-inch hollow terra cotta blocks with a 1-inch facing of cement 
plaster and a reinforced concrete cornice. An iron stairway, located 
between the steel tank and the wall of the tower, leads from the front 
entrance up to the roof and down to the base of the tower. There is 
a granolithic floor between the steel tank and the masonry wall. 

The only inflammable and perishable materials used in the entire 
structure are the wooden window frames and six ridge boards for 
the turret roof. 

The contractor began work promptly but, owing to delays due to 
resurfacing a large portion of the cut stone and to a fire on Novem- 
ber 29 which destroyed the contractor's office and store-house, the 
work was not completed at the close of the year. 



52 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

On September 30 the steel tank was drained to give the contractor 
an opportunity to construct the roof of the tower. The work remain- 
ing to be done consists of laying the asphalte and tiles on the roof, 
plastering the turret walls, laying the granolithic floor between the 
steel tank and the masonry wall, painting and cleaning up. 

The plant used during construction consisted of 4 steam stiff-leg 
derricks with booms 62 to 84 feet in length, a |-cubic yard capacity 
Smith concrete mixer and miscellaneous small tools. The concrete 
forms were made of wood. 

The force employed averaged 30 and reached a maximum of 38 
men. 

The expenditures under this contract amount to $34,109.51, and 
the value of the work done at the close of the year is $41,000. 

Extension of 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main in 

Newton. 

In November, 1914, contracts were made with the United States 
Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Company at very favorable prices for the 
60-inch cast-iron water pipes and specials required for extending the 
60-inch Weston Aqueduct supply main laid in 1909 and 1910, 
through Commonwealth Avenue in Newton, from a point 700 feet 
east of Prince Street to the Charles River, a distance of about 14,500 
feet. Under these contracts 6,855.70 tons of 60-inch pipe and 
258.38 tons of specials were delivered at a cost of $147,109.64. 

A contract was made with Andrew M. Cusack of Boston for laying 
7,990 linear feet of the pipe line east of Auburn Street on April 30, 
and another contract was made with Charles A. Kelley of Somerville 
May 18 for laying the remainder of the line, with the exception of the 
crossing under the Boston & Albany Railroad, where a 60-inch steel 
pipe was laid. 

Mr. Cusack began work at the easterly end of his section May 20 
and for the following four months the progress was unsatisfactory, 
due to the failure of the contractor to push the work. Later, when 
arrangements were made to increase the progress, there was con- 
siderable difficulty in obtaining workmen, and as a result there re- 
mained 144 linear feet of pipe line to be laid under this contract at 
the close of the year. The force employed averaged about 72 men 
and 11 horses and reached a maximum of 98 men and 15 horses. 
At the close of the year 7,821 linear feet of 60-inch pipe line had 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 53 

been laid and 1,868 cubic yards of rock had been excavated. The 
60-inch pipe line is located parallel with the 48-inch pipe line laid 
in 1902, with a space of only a few feet between the lines, and great 
care was necessary in blasting to prevent injury to the 48-inch main. 
In earth excavation the pipe trench was excavated with pick and 
shovel and the material was loaded into buckets and hoisted and 
dumped into carts with portable steam derricks. In the easterly 
portion of the work considerable difficulty was experienced on ac- 
count of the large amount of ground water that entered the trench. 
The expenditures under this contract amount to $40,597.13, and the 
total value of the work done is $47,900. 

Mr. Kelley began work May 24 at Auburn Street and completed 
his entire contract December 11, about two months later than the 
date specified in the contract. A connection was made between the 
new main and the 48-inch main at the Charles River on October 16. 
In earth excavation trenches were excavated with pick and shovel 
and the material was hoisted in buckets and dumped into carts with 
portable steam derricks. The force employed averaged 62 men and 
8 horses and reached a maximum of 84 men and 10 horses. Under 
this contract 6,376 linear feet of 60-inch pipe line was laid and 592 cubic 
yards of rock was excavated. The expenditures under the contract 
amount to $27,633.62, and the value of the work done is $33,349.56. 

The pipes and specials for both of the pipe-laying contracts were 
delivered to the contractors and loaded on their wagons by the 
department forces at the Woodland pipe yard, located about one 
mile from the pipe line. 

By agreement, the resurfacing of the pipe trench for the entire 
distance is being done by the city of Newton Highway Department 
with its regular forces. At the close of the year 10,400 linear feet of 
trench had been resurfaced at a cost of $18,436, equivalent to $1.77 
per linear foot of trench. 

At the bridge over the Boston & Albany Railroad the 60-inch pipe 
line was offset and laid down the embankments and under the rail- 
road tracks south of Commonwealth Avenue in private land. . For a 
distance of 86 feet, where located under the railroad tracks, a 60- 
inch steel pipe was laid. This pipe is made of open hearth flange 
steel plates f of an inch in thickness and 1 inch rivets, with alternate 
inside and outside courses, with butt and double-strap double-riv- 
eted longitudinal seams and single-riveted lap girth seams. 



54 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

By arrangement with the Boston & Albany Railroad Company its 
forces excavated and sheeted the trench for the pipe under the rail- 
road, and placed under each rail three 15-inch steel beams 20 feet in 
length supported at each end on two 12-inch x 12-inch hard pine 
mud sills to support the trains over the trench while the pipe was 
being laid. This work was begun April 11. 

Walsh's Holyoke Steam Boiler Works constructed the steel pipe 
and laid it in position in the trench under the tracks for the sum of 
$1,720. Arrangements were made for the testing and painting of 
this pipe similar to the arrangements followed in connection with the 
steel pipes for the 24-inch southern high-service pipe line. The final 
painting of the 60-inch pipe was done by Hemphill & Soulis of 
Newton for the sum of $20. After the pipe was tested and painted 
the trench was filled with concrete, which was carried over the top 
of the pipe to a depth of 6 inches, by the department forces. About 
78 cubic yards of concrete were placed and the pipe was kept full of 
water under pressure while the work was in progress. 

The cost of the work done by the Railroad Company was $1,581.99 
and the cost of the work done by the department forces was $997.88, 
which, with the cost of the pipe and laying, is equivalent to $50 per 
linear foot. 

The pipe line crosses under four main line tracks at this place, and 
except that for a portion of the time the speed of the trains was re- 
duced to 15 miles per hour while crossing the trench, the regular 
train service was maintained without interruption while the work 
was in progress. The work was completed May 22. 

Sudbury Power Plant. 

In 1914 plans and specifications were prepared for the construction 
of a hydro-electric plant to utilize the water power available at the 
Sudbury Dam in Southborough, and a contract was made with the 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston December 21, 1914, 
for the purchase of electric energy to be developed. 

Specifications for the hydro-electric machinery were sent to the 
leading manufacturers of this type of machinery January 4. The 
machinery is to be installed in the existing gate-house at the north- 
erly end of the spillway of the Sudbury Dam. The gate-house was 
not designed for use as a power-house and its use for this purpose 
requires that the water wheels shall be installed under very unusual 



No. 57,] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 55 

hydraulic conditions. Because of the necessity of discharging the 
water from the wheels through long pipe lines at high velocity, 
trouble from hydraulic surges was anticipated by the manufacturers 
and they were unwilling to make any definite guarantee of efficiency 
based on tests after installation. 

With one exception all the manufacturers from whom bids were 
requested declined to submit proposals. The invitations for pro- 
posals were therefore withdrawn on January 27. The plans and spec- 
ifications were then modified in several particulars to provide for 
the construction of a surge tank near the outlet of each turbine and 
the furnishing of the hydraulic governors by the Commonwealth, for 
testing the turbines at the Holyoke testing flume instead of in place, 
and for receiving proposals for either the hydraulic or the electric 
machinery or for both. 

Proposals were received under the revised plans and specifications 
June 11. The proposal of the S. Morgan Smith Company of York, 
Pennsylvania, to furnish and install the hydraulic machinery for the 
sum of $11,760, and of the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing 
Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to furnish and install the 
electrical apparatus for the sum of $19,349, were accepted, and con- 
tracts were made with these companies on June 23. 

The plant will consist of one 30-inch, 1,000-horse power, and two 
24-inch, 300-horse power, vertical-shaft hydraulic turbines directly 
connected to one 900-kilo-volt-ampere and two 275-kilo-volt-ampere 
alternating-current generators. Two 125-volt direct-current gener- 
ators, each of sufficient capacity to furnish excitation for the three 
main generators when under maximum load are provided, one 
directly connected with an electric motor, the other directly con- 
nected to the top of the shaft of the 900-kilo-volt-ampere gener- 
ator. 

The 30-inch turbine will be operated by the water discharged into 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 and the two 24-inch turbines by the 
water discharged into the Weston Aqueduct. The units will operate 
at a speed of 360 revolutions per minute and deliver 3-phase, 60- 
cycle alternating current at a pressure of 2,400 volts, which will be 
stepped up by two 750-kilo-volt-ampere transformers to 13,200 volts 
for transmission for a distance of about three-fourths of a mile to the 
transmission line of the Company. 

For a distance of 730 feet from the power-house, to an existing 



56 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

granite building used for a store-house, the transmission line will be 
located under ground near the top of the dam in a conduit. The 
store-house is being remodelled so that a portion can be utilized as 
a lightning arrester chamber. Two underground cables, each of suf- 
ficient capacity to carry the entire output from the station, will be 
laid in the underground conduit between the power-house and the 
lightning arrester chamber, and from the latter point a single over- 
head line is being constructed for a distance of about 4,000 feet to 
connect with the Company's line on Brewer Road in Framingham 
near the Southborough boundary. line. 

The turbines were tested at the Holyoke testing flume October 
22 to 27. The 30-inch turbine developed an average efficiency of 
87.4 per cent, or 2.58 per cent, in excess of the guarantee. The 
24-inch turbine developed an efficiency of 85.3 per cent, or 1.15 per 
cent, in excess of the guarantee. 

One of the 24-inch turbines and a portion of the 30-inch turbine 
were shipped to the power-house from the manufacturer's works at 
York, Pennsylvania, December 28. 

The electric generators were tested at the manufacturer's works at 
East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, between October 19 and 27, with 
satisfactory results, and are now being held at the works until the 
installation of the turbines is further advanced. 

An agreement was made with the Lombard Governor Company of 
Ashland, Massachusetts, for three horizontal-type hydraulic, gov- 
ernors for the turbines on July 21 for the sum of $2,404, and they 
have been built and are ready for delivery when required. One of 
the governors is of 6,000 foot pounds capacity and the other two 
are each of 2,500 foot pounds capacity. The equipment includes 
electric-driven rotary oil pump, with capacity of 15 gallons per 
minute, a pressure tank and a sump tank and unloading valve of 
sufficient capacity to serve all three governors. 

The work of constructing the surge tanks and enlarging the wells 
in the existing gate-house to provide for the turbines was begun 
early in June. The surge tanks for the Weston Aqueduct service are 
15 feet long, 7 J feet wide and 7 feet high; the one for the Framing- 
ham Reservoir No. 3 service is of irregular shape, about 10 feet long, 
6 feet wide and 13 feet high. A 6-inch galvanized iron air pipe and 
a lj-inch brass observation pipe are carried up from each tank and 
end just below the power-house floor, a few feet above high-water 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 57 

line in the reservoir. The 6-inch pipes are provided with valves for 
regulating the flow of air as desired. 

The two surge tanks on the Weston Aqueduct service are con- 
nected with the outlet conduits just below the draft tubes of the 
24-inch turbines, by means of 30-inch cast-iron pipes, with di- 
aphragms at the surge tank ends having openings 21 inches in 
diameter. A connection between the surge tank on the Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3 service and the 48-inch outlet pipe below the draft 
tube of the 30-inch turbine is made by means of a 24-inch branch 
with a bell mouth end extending into the surge tank. 

This work involved the excavation of 400 cubic yards of brick and 
stone masonry in the existing dam and gate-house and the placing 
of 250 cubic yards of concrete; the removal of 50 feet of 48-inch 
cast-iron pipe and the laying of 15 tons of 30-inch to 64-inch di- 
ameter cast-iron pipe and specials. 

It was necessary to do a large portion of this work by electric 
light at the bottom of the three outlet wells at the gate-house at a 
depth of about 60 feet below the surface of the water in the reser- 
voir, while maintaining a flow of about 100,000,000 gallons per day 
through the gate-house for water supply. 

Under these conditions it was deemed advisable to make the ex- 
cavations with unusual care and without the use of explosives. An 
agreement was therefore made with Coleman Brothers, of Chelsea, 
to furnish the plant required at a specified daily rental and to furnish 
the necessary experienced labor at cost plus 10 per cent. 

The plant used consisted of a 90-horse power locomotive-type 
boiler and a 50-horse power Ingersoll-Rand air compressor, a stiff-leg 
boom derrick and hoist, one 6-inch centrifugal and two 3-inch recip- 
rocating pumps, a blacksmith's outfit and the necessary drills, air hose 
and small tools required for the work. 

In order to reduce the plant charges and to obtain the desired 
progress, the work was carried on continuously in three 8-hour shifts, 
with the exception of Sundays and holidays, until November 20, 
when the bulk of the work was completed. Until this time the force 
averaged 52 men, and reached a maximum of 70 men. 

The plant was then dismantled and the work of cutting channels 
and pockets in the masonry walls of the turbine wells for the gate 
shafts and steady bearings and the steelwork foundations for the 
generators was completed with a portable air compressor operated 



58 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

by a gasoline engine. The force employed on this portion of the 
work averaged 11 men. 

During October a hand-operated traveling crane and runway .of 
12,000 pounds capacity was installed in the power-house by Wonham, 
Sanger & Bates, of New York, for the sum of $880. 

In remodelling the gate-house to provide for the turbines it was 
necessary to remove three sluice gates at the outlets from the turbine 
wells and provide three new sluice gates for controlling the flow of 
water into the wells. The new sluice gates have a clear opening 11 
feet 2 inches high and 5 feet 5J inches wide, and are provided with 
two-speed ball-bearing gate stands with limit switches for electrical or 
hand operation. Each gate is made with an upper and lower leaf and 
the gate shaft is attached to the lower leaf, which rises first, sliding 
over composition guide strips on the up-stream face of the upper leaf 
until its upper edge engages lugs on the top of the upper leaf, when 
both rise together until the lower part of the leaves are above high 
water in the reservoir. This unusual construction was made nec- 
essary to avoid having the gate come above the floor of the power- 
house when open. The gates are being constructed by the Coffin 
Valve Company, of Boston, for the sum of S3, 915. About half of 
the shop work on the gates is completed at the close of the year. 

A contract was made December 2 with the Safety Insulated Wire 
and Cable Company, of New York, to furnish and install in the un- 
derground conduit which has been constructed by the department 
forces, about 1,550 feet of 3-conductor, paper-insulated, lead-sheathed 
cable for the sum of $1,182.61. 

Two Type M Venturi indicator recorder registers have been sub- 
stituted for the old Type D registers on the Venturi meters which 
measure the flow in the two 60-inch pipe lines leading to the Weston 
Aqueduct, in order to obtain more accurate measurement of the 
water under the conditions that will prevail when the hydro-electric 
plant is in operation. 

The total amount expended for the construction of the power 
plant is $50,932.51, of which $50,151.16 was expended during the 
year. 

Engineering. 

In connection with the construction work the engineering force has 
prepared the plans and specifications for contracts and supervised the 
construction work as required. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 59 



MAINTENANCE. 

Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds. 

The annual rainfall on the Wachusett watershed was 44.65 inches, 
which is 0.78 of an inch less than the average for the previous 18 
years, but 6.11 inches more than in 1914. On the Sudbury water- 
shed the rainfall amounted to 43.93 inches during the year, which is 
0.88 of an inch less than the average for the previous 40 years and 
6.22 inches more than in 1914. On the Cochituate watershed the 
annual rainfall amounted to 44.35 inches. 

The large rainfall of about 6.5 inches in January; the extremely 
small rainfall of 0.06 of an inch on the Wachusett watershed, of 
0.05 of an inch on the Sudbury watershed and 0.01 of an inch on the 
Cochituate watershed in March; the low rainfall in April, May and 
September and unusually large precipitation during July and August, 
amounting to 15.50 inches on the Wachusett watershed, are notable 
departures from the normal precipitation. A total precipitation of 
6.42 inches from June 30 to July 3, as measured by our gages at 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, in Boston, was an unusual occurrence. 

The yield of the Wachusett watershed was 942,000 gallons per 
day per square mile, which is 88 per cent, of the average for the 
previous 18 years. The yield of the Sudbury watershed was 719,- 
000 gallons per day per square mile, which is 72 per cent, of the 
average for the previous 40 years, and 80 per cent, of the average 
for the previous 18 years, or the period during which water has been 
discharged into the Sudbury Reservoir from the Wachusett water- 
shed. The yield of the Cochituate watershed was 792,000 gallons 
per day per square mile, which is 86 per cent, of the average for 
the previous 52 years. 

During the year the city of Worcester has turned into the present 
Wachusett watershed, from the 9.35 square miles of the former 
Wachusett watershed taken for its water supply in 1911, 1,342,- 
400,000 gallons of water. 

Storage Reservoirs. 
The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water 
Works, the elevations of the water surface in feet above Boston City 
Base, and the quantity of water stored in each reservoir at the begin- 
ning and end of the year, are shown by the following table. 



60 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
High 

Water. 


Capacity 
(Gallons). 


Jan. 1, 1915. 


Jan. 1, 1916. 


Stokage Reservoirs. 


Eleva- 
tion 1 
of 

Water 
Surface. 


Amount 

stored 
(Gallons). 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
Water 

Surface. 


Amount 

stored 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate watershed: — 

Lake Cochituate, includ- 
ing Dudley Pond. 
Sudbury watershed: — 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoir 

No. 1. 
Framingham Reservoir 

No. 2. 
Framingham Reservoir 

No. 3. 
Ashland Reservoir, . 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Farm Pond, 

Wachusett watershed: — 

Wachusett Reservoir, 


144.36 

260.00 
169.75 
177.87 
186.74 
225.21 
305.00 
337.91 
159.25 

395.00 


2,328,300,000 

7,253,500,000 

287,500,000 2 

529,900,0002 

1,180,000,0002 

1,416,400,000 

1,520,900,000 

1,256,900,000 

167,500,000 

64,968,000,000 


142.62 

257.81 
167.66 
175.98 
183.03 
224.34 
304.05 
337.66 
158.66 

381.89 


1,825,000,000 

6,343,900,000 

214,400,000 

480,900,000 

902,900,000 

1,368,500,000 

1,461,500,000 

1,208,000,000 

136,000,000 

48,438,100,000 


142.93 

249.53 
167.89 
176.19 
184.48 
224.53 
304.24 
337.29 
157.87 

391.05 


1,930,100,000 

3,340,300,000 

224,300,000 

489,900,000 

1,017,600,000 

1,379,000,000 

1,473,300,000 

1,136,200,000 

94,400,000 

59,728,600,000 


Totals, .... 


- 


80,908,900,000 


- 


62,379,200,000 


- 


70,813,700,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 



2 To top of Flashboards. 



The diagram, page 61, is submitted to show the quantity of water 
stored in the Wachusett Reservoir and the quantity stored in all the 
storage reservoirs combined at any time during the year. 

Wachusett Reservoir. — The water in this reservoir was 13.11 feet 
below high-water mark at the beginning of the year. It fell 0.72 of 
a foot during the following week and the water surface was at eleva- 
tion 381.17 on January 6, which was the lowest elevation reached 
during the year. From January 6 to March 1 the reservoir filled 
rapidly to elevation 389.81. On account of the small draft from the 
reservoir, due to drawing down Sudbury Reservoir in connection with 
the installation of the hydro-electric plant at the Sudbury Dam, and 
to the low rainfall, the elevation of the water surface remained 
between elevation 388.88 and 390.17 until August 4. On account of 
the heavy precipitation during August, the reservoir filled quite rap- 
idly during the early part of the month and the water surface 
reached elevation 392.42 August 25, which was the maximum eleva- 
tion reached during the year. From August 25 to December 18 the 
water in the reservoir was drawn down gradually at the rate of about 
1 foot a month to elevation 388.98, and after December 18 the water 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



61 



QUANTITY OF WATER STORED IN THE WACHUSETT RESERVOIR 
AND IN ALL THE STORAGE RESERVOIRS COMBINED 

DURING 1915 

JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. 5ER OCT. NOV. DEC. 



82,000 
80,000 
78,000 
76,000 
74,000 
72.000 
70,000 
68,000 

m 
c 

66,000 



(0 



64.000 



c 

O 62.000 



2 60,000 



58,000 



56,000 



54,000 



52.000 



50,000 



48.000 



1 1 1 

COMBINED CAPACITY OF 


1 1 1 1 

ALL STORAGE RESERVOIRS AT 


HIGH 


1 
WATER > 






























































































































































</ 


\f 
















COR 






£\ 














*? 


m 




o 
■* J 
























.4? 














-M 








\ o- ' 






















\*c 


























































































CAPA 


CITY 


?/■ w 


CHUSL 


f77 /! 


ESERV 


OIR A 


T Hit 


W w 


\TER 


^ 




























i 
























£ 














\TK 










\f 














^ 






















Ufj 






















CO 














-SiS 


^ 


r 1 


cc 
















^*> 


J 




A 


n 


t 




















































































































































































^ 


























4_ 
























V 

























82,000 



80.000 



78,000 



76.000 



74.000 



72.000 



70.000 



68,000 

(A 

C 

o 

66.000 — 
rt) 

O 

64.000 

C 
62,000 O 



60,000 
58.000 
56.000 
54.000 
52.000 
50.000 
48.000 



JAN. FEB MAR. APR MAY JUN. JUL AUG SEP OCT.. NOV. DEC. 



62 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

rose about 2 feet and was at elevation 391.05 at the end of the year. 
No water was wasted from the reservoir during the year. 

In compliance with the requirements of chapter 488 of the Acts of 
the year 1895, 1,049,500,000 gallons of water was discharged from the 
reservoir into the Nashua River through the pool below the dam and 
through the pipe line which discharges directly into the Lancaster 
Mills canal at a rate of not less than 12,000,000 gallons per week 
for the use of the mills. 

No soil stripping has been necessary along the shores of the reservoir 
this year, but miscellaneous debris brought into the reservoir during 
the spring floods has been collected from the shores and disposed of. 

Cunningham's Brook at the westerly end of the North Dike, and 
two small brooks tributary to Thomas Basin were improved for an 
aggregate length of 1,568 feet at a cost of $711.97. The brush and 
weeds on a strip 50 feet in width along the margin of the reservoir 
on the face and riprap berm of the North and South dikes, along 
the sides of brooks flowing directly into the reservoir and along all 
highways adjoining the reservoir lands have been mowed, raked up 
and burned. This work extended for a distance of 56 miles and cost 
$3,186.22. 

Party fences between the Metropolitan Water Works lands and 
adjoining lands were constructed for a length of 1,013 feet, of chest- 
nut posts and old telephone wire. An equal amount of similar fence 
was built by the owners of the adjoining lands. 

The Wachusett Dam and adjacent structures and grounds have re- 
ceived the usual care and are in good condition. The road up the 
westerly hillside to the waste-weir was resurfaced for a length of 830 
feet and a width of 12 feet where washed out by the excessive rains 
in August. As a safeguard for the employees, electric wiring has 
been arranged so that the electric lamps in the gate-chamber are 
lighted when the door is opened. 

The barn at the Lamson place in Boylston, which was left standing 
when the house was sold in 1914, has been torn down and rebuilt at 
the Cook place, Lancaster Street, West Boylston, at a cost of 
$1,374.09, including considerable grading around the barn and the 
construction of about 150 linear feet of wire fence along the highway. 
The Kramer house on Wilson Street, Clinton, was partially destroyed 
by a fire, due to a defective chimney, October 9, and was repaired 
at a cost of $654.36. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 63 

Sudbury Reservoir. — The water in the Sudbury Reservoir was 1.19 
feet below the crest of the wasteway at the beginning of the year and 
rose to elevation 259.20 on January 20. By February 23 it had 
fallen to elevation 256.93. It rose to elevation 258.12 about the 
middle of March and then fell gradually until the middle of May, 
when it was at elevation 257.00. During the following month the 
water was drawn down to elevation 252.00 to facilitate the work of 
preparing the gate-house for the power plant. About August 15 the 
reservoir had been filled to elevation 256.00 in connection with the 
operation of the Wachusett power plant. The water was again 
drawn down to about elevation 253.00 by the middle of September 
and remained at about this elevation until the latter part of October. 
During November and December the water was gradually drawn 
down to elevation 249.00, to provide for the installation of the new 
sluice gates for the power plant, and was at elevation 249.53 at the 
end of the year. 

Advantage was taken of the low water in the Sudbury Reservoir 
to remove the sediment which had collected' in the various inlet 
channels, and to repoint all joints in the top and up-stream face of 
the masonry wasteway above elevation 254.9, also in the water side 
of the substructure of the gate-house. The joints in the down- 
stream side of the circular dam above Middle Road and in the arch 
bridge at Parkerville Road were also repointed, and the paving that 
was loose and out of position on the slopes of the roads crossing the 
reservoir was relaid. 

A growth of vegetation which occurred below high-water line, on 
account of the low water in the reservoir, was mowed and burned 
and the Southborough swimming pool was cleaned. 

Additional stop-planks, equivalent to a total height of 50 feet, 
were made for use at the gate-house if required in connection with 
the installation of the power plant. The driving horse at the Sud- 
bury Dam was sold, on account of injury received from a fall, and 
an automobile truck, made from a Ford runabout, was purchased. 
As a result the foreman has been able to give the work much more 
efficient supervision than formerly. The grounds about the Sudbury 
Dam have been given the usual attention. 

Sprouts and brush were mowed in the lanes through the woods 
along the land boundaries for a total length of 8 miles. Wheelock 
No. 65 wire fence has been constructed for a distance of 638 feet 
between the reservoir land and adjoining lands. 



64 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3. — The water in this reservoir was 
maintained within a few feet of the top of the wasteway during the 
entire year and no water was wasted from the reservoir. The gate- 
house and grounds about the dam have been given the usual atten- 
tion and are in good condition. The carriage shed and store-house 
near the dam was repaired and painted. Chestnut posts were set for 
a distance of 2,500 feet for fence between the reservoir land and land 
of Andrew O. Stensson on the northerly side and at the head of the 
reservoir, and, with the posts set last year, the entire line is now 
ready for the wire fence. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and 
Whitehall Reservoirs. — No water has been drawn from these reser- 
voirs for supplying the Metropolitan Water District during the year. 
A waste of not less than 1,500,000 gallons of water per day has been 
maintained at Framingham Dam No. 1, as required by the provisions 
of chapter 177 of the Acts of the year 1872, and additional quantities 
of water have been wasted from time to time as required to dispose 
of the yield of the watersheds tributary to these reservoirs. 

During the year the water in Framingham Reservoir No. 1 aver- 
aged about 1 foot above, in Framingham Reservoir No. 2 about 0.9 
of a foot above, in Ashland Reservoir 0.5 of a foot above and in the 
Hopkinton Reservoir 0.4 of a foot above the crest of the wasteway. 
The average elevation of the water in Whitehall Reservoir was about 
0.2 of a foot below high-water mark. The gate-houses and grounds 
about the dams at these reservoirs have been given the usual atten- 
tion and are in satisfactory condition. 

The small dam at the outlet of the small basin near the Neyhart 
land and Salem Street, at Framingham Reservoir No. 1, was repaired 
and a new box culvert constructed. The trees and brush have been 
cut and removed for a width of 5 feet along the boundaries of the 
Water Works lands for a distance of about 8 miles, and brush has 
been mowed along boundary lanes previously cut for a distance of 
about 22 miles. Vegetation has been mowed and burned along the 
outlet channels below Ashland and Hopkinton reservoirs. 

Wheelock No. 65 wire fence was constructed for a distance of 
1,490 feet along the boundary of the Water Works land below the 
dam at Ashland Reservoir and the gate-keeper's house was painted. 

At the Hopkinton Reservoir the grass and weeds on the filter-beds 
were mowed and burned and the gate-keeper's house was painted. 

New stop-planks were made and put in position on the up-stream 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 65 

side of the gates in the outlet flume at Whitehall Reservoir and a 
portion of the up-stream masonry facing of the upper mill pond dam, 
which had been pushed out of position by the freezing of the earth 
behind it, was rebuilt. The brush and weeds in the lower mill pond 
site were cut and burned and the brook channel between Wood 
Street and the lower dam was cleaned out and straightened. This 
work has greatly improved the appearance of our land. Four cot- 
tages were built at Whitehall Reservoir during the year. There are 
now 65 cottages located on the shores of the reservoir, and 10 motor 
boats, 83 row boats and 30 canoes were in use during the year, which 
is an increase of 10 over the number in use in 1914. 

Farm Pond. — No water was discharged into or wasted from Farm 
Pond during the year, and the average elevation of the water in the 
pond was about 1 foot below high-water mark. The town of Fram- 
ingham pumped 228,600,000 gallons of water from the filter-gallery 
on the shore of the pond during the year for a portion of its water 
supply, and the balance of 57,400,000 gallons was pumped from the 
Sudbury Aqueduct. For several years the sprouts and brush that have 
grown up between the paving stones on the sides of the Farm Pond 
dike and Farm Pond aqueduct have been mowed, and the roots had 
increased in size until they had pushed the paving out of position 
in places. This year the paving was taken up and the roots were 
removed and the paving then replaced in proper position. 

Lake Cochituate. — No water was discharged from the lake into the 
Cochituate Aqueduct and no water was received from the Sudbury 
watershed or Dudley Pond during the year. The elevation of the 
water in the reservoir averaged about 1 foot below high-water mark 
and water was wasted at the outlet dam during each month except 
April, May and June. A new entrance was built at the carriage 
house at the foreman's residence so that automobiles and auto- 
trucks can be run into the house to be overhauled and repaired. The 
tin roof of the effluent gate-house was blown off December 26 by a 
heavy wind storm, and arrangements for repairing the roof were 
being made at the close of the year. Material which had accumu- 
lated in the sand catcher and catch basins of the surface water 
drain from Cochituate Village has been removed as required. The 
slopes of the open channel have been mowed and the channel has 
been kept in proper condition to discharge the surface water. The 
buildings and grounds in the vicinity of the effluent gate-house and 
of the foreman's residence have been given proper care, and leaves 



66 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and debris have been removed from the shores of the lake. An iron 
pipe fence has been erected on the water side of the screen-cleaning 
platform in the effluent gate-house to safeguard the employees. 
Twelve cottages and 3 garages were built on the shores of the lake 
and 1 cottage was torn down, leaving a total of 74 cottages at the 
end of the year. 

Dudley Pond. — No water has been discharged into Lake Cochit- 
uate from this pond during the past ten years. During the year 10 
cottages and 1 boat-house were built in the immediate vicinity of the 
pond, making a total of 46 cottages, 2 ice-houses and 3 boat-houses 
along the shores at the end of the year. Between these buildings and 
the Cochituate-Wayland Road and on the north side of the pond 14 
cottages were built during the year, making a total of 80 cottages 
and 2 stores located within a short distance of the pond in addition 
to the buildings located along the shores of the pond. The pond is 
no longer of value for water supply purposes and under these condi- 
tions the expenditure necessary to maintain proper sanitary inspec- 
tion does not appear to be warranted. 

Aqueducts. 

Wachusett Aqueduct . — Water was discharged through this aque- 
duct from the Wachusett Reservoir during 260 days in 1915. The 
total time that the aqueduct was in use is equivalent to 123 days, 18 
hours and 57 minutes, and the total quantity of water supplied was 
25,652,400,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 70,280,548 gallons 
per day for the entire year. The Westborough State Hospital 
pumped 68,602,000 gallons of water, equivalent to an average con- 
sumption of 188,000 gallons per day, from the open channel at the 
lower end of the aqueduct. The usual care has been given to the 
aqueduct lands and structures and 12,950 feet of Wheelock No. 65 
wire fence has been erected along the boundary of the aqueduct 
lands, and 364 feet of stone wall was rebuilt. The cost of this work 
was $1,879.60. 

During September the interior surface of the aqueduct on the 
Assabet Bridge was given two coats of Portland cement grout con- 
taining about 2 per cent, of Medusa waterproofing compound, to 
determine its effect upon the leakage from the aqueduct at this place, 
which appears to take place through fine cracks in the brick lining. 
Before applying the cement grout the surface of the masonry was 
thoroughly cleaned with wire brooms and a strong solution of car- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 67 

bonate of soda. The section of the aqueduct treated is 353 feet in 
length and about 1,100 square yards of surface were covered at a 
cost of $240.99. While it is evident that a large portion of the leak- 
age has been stopped, opportunity has not been had to make ob- 
servations during freezing weather after the aqueduct has been flow- 
ing full for a few days. 

Water grass and weeds were removed from the bottom of the 
open channel between the lower and upper dams for a distance of 
2.06 miles, the bunch grass and other vegetation were removed from 
the shore lines, and the slopes at the flow line were regraded with 
material which had been washed down the slope and were then faced 
with heavy gravel found along the shore. The cost of the work was 
$1,020.88 or 4.7 cents per linear foot of shore line, which is equivalent 
to a cost of 0.3 of a cent per linear foot of shore line per year since 
the channel was put into service. The granite masonry at the lower 
dam and at five highway bridges over the channel was repointed 
where necessary and the iron rail fences were painted. On the north 
side of the channel, just below the upper dam, a very unsightly area 
of about 4 acres, in plain view from the railroad and highway, has 
been improved by constructing 167 linear feet of board-bottom drain- 
age ditch and grading and seeding the land, so that it is now an at- 
tractive field and the quality of the water draining into the open 
channel at this place has been materially improved. 

Sudbury Aqueduct. — This aqueduct was in constant use for deliv- 
ering water from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 to the Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir every day during the year. The average daily flow in the 
aqueduct was 63,261,000 gallons. The usual care has been given to 
the aqueduct lands and structures. The openings around the screens 
in the gate-house at Farm Pond were covered with planks to safeguard 
the employees. Trees and brush were cut for a width of 5 feet along 
the boundary of the aqueduct land in the swamp on both sides of South 
Main Street in Natick. Quite a number of large old elm and willow 
trees were cut down near Brook Street, South Natick, as the roots 
of the trees had begun to grow through the aqueduct. A 24-inch 
cast-iron pipe sewer was laid by the town of Wellesley across the 
aqueduct land under the Waban Valley bridge through the third arch 
from the east end. An unsightly slope at the cut on the north side of 
Duncklee Street in Newton Highlands was graded and improved. 

Weston Aqueduct. — During 349 days in 1915 water was supplied 
from the Sudbury Reservoir through this aqueduct. The total time 



68 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

that the aqueduct was in use is equivalent to 345 days, 17 hours and 
30 minutes, and the total quantity of water delivered into the 
Weston Reservoir was 12,254,100,000 gallons, equivalent to an aver- 
age flow of 33,573,000 gallons per day for the entire year. Between 
November 8 and 20 the interior of the aqueduct was cleaned from 
the head-chamber, near the Sudbury Dam in Southborough, to the 
manhole near the west portal of tunnel No. 4, located about 2,000 
feet west of Highland Street in Weston, a distance of about 10 miles, 
and from the Weston Reservoir to the terminal chamber in Weston, 
a distance of about 1 mile. At the upper end, from the head cham- 
ber to Nobscot, there was very little deposit on the masonry, but at 
the lower end where the velocity of the water is less than in the 
upper portion of the aqueduct, the deposit on the masonry was as 
much as § of an inch in thickness and adhered firmly to the walls. 
The cost of the work was $674.25. From the manhole at the west 
portal of tunnel No. 4 to the Weston Reservoir, a distance of about 
1J miles, the aqueduct cannot be drained except by pumping out the 
water and this section was not cleaned. The aqueduct lands and 
structures have been given the usual attention. 

The house and barn at the White place in Nobscot have been re- 
paired, and lanes 5 feet in width were cut through the woods along 
the boundary lines of the aqueduct at this place. Fences along the 
boundaries of the aqueduct land have been repaired for an aggregate 
length of 4,675 feet. The iron hooks supporting the balance weights 
attached to ladders in the aqueduct manholes were replaced with 
brass hooks as the old hooks had become weakened by rust. 

Cochituate Aqueduct. — This aqueduct was not used during the 
year. The aqueduct lands and structures have been given the usual 
attention. The channel from the culvert under Dedman's waste- 
weir to Morse's Pond was straightened and improved. The grading 
and surfacing of the unsightly slope of the deep cut on the easterly 
side of Beacon Street in Newton, which was begun last year, has 
been completed and the appearance of the land has been very much 
improved by this work. 

Pumping Stations. 
At the two stations at Chestnut Hill Reservoir 12,922,060,000 
gallons of water was pumped into the low-service mains of which 
2,724,660,000 gallons was repumped at the Spot Pond and Arling- 
ton stations for the northern high and extra high services, and 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



69 



11,808,610,000 gallons was pumped into the southern high-service 
mains, of which 250,970,000 gallons was repumped for the southern 
extra high service. The total amount of water pumped at all the 
pumping stations was 27,706,300,000 gallons, which is 1,024,860,000 
gallons less than in 1914, and the total cost of operating all the 
stations was $96,847.21, which is $7,958.99 less than in 1914, the 
saving being due largely to the smaller amount expended for repairs. 
The cost per million gallons is $3,495 in 1915 as compared with $3,648 
in 1914. 

The amount of coal furnished by various parties at the pumping 
stations and the cost of the coal is as follows: — 





Stations (Amount in 


3ross Tons). 


el 
o 
H 

m 
m 
O 

tS-tf 

O 


Dealers. 


oi O 

u 


1 

m O 


T3 

a 

o 

P4 

+3 
o 
a 

GO 


a 

O 

.9 

< 


u 

a 

>> 
K 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Co., bituminous, 


793.88 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$4.14 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Co., bituminous, 


- 


1,145.56 


- 


~ 


- 


3.93 


H. N. Hartwell & Son, Inc., bituminous, . 


- 


2,577.01 


- 


- 


- 


4.08 


C. W. Claflin & Co., anthracite-buckwheat, 


153.35 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.08 


C. W. Claflin & Co., anthracite-buckwheat, 


- 


979.06 


- 


- 


- 


2.92 


Bader Coal Co., bituminous, .... 


- 


- 


774.21 


- 


- 


5.06 


Locke Coal Co., anthracite-screenings, 


- 


- 


283.03 


- 


- 


2.50 


Bader Coal Co., bituminous, .... 


- 


- 


- 


167.62 


- 


4.36 


Hetherington & Co., bituminous, 


- 


- 


- 


253.30 


- 


4.32 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Co., bituminous, 




- 


- 


- 


96.43 


4.11 


Quemahoning Coal Co., bituminous, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


137.72 


4.19' 




793.88 


3,722.57 


774.21 


420.92 


234.15 


- 


Total, anthracite-buckwheat, .... 


153.35 


979.06 


•- 


- 


- 


- 


Total, anthracite-screenings, .... 


- 


- 


283.03 


- 


- 


- 


Average cost, bituminous: — 














In bins, 


$4.14 


$4.03 


$5.06 


$4.33 


$4.16 


- 


On cars, 


3.89 


3.96 


- 


4.25 


4.00 


- 


Average cost, anthracite-buckwheat: — 














In bins, 


3.08 


2.92 


- 


- 


- 


- 




2.86 


2.83 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average cost, anthracite-screenings, in bins, 


- 


- 


2.50 


- 


- 


- 



1 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to storage of the coal. 



70 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



All bituminous coal was purchased under specifications which pro- 
vide for a variation in price with variation in heat units and ash as 
determined by analysis. The price per ton was reduced 2 cents for 
each 50 heat units or fraction thereof less than 14,700 per pound of 
dry coal, and 1 cent for each J of 1 per cent, or fraction thereof 
of ash in the dry coal in excess of 8 per cent. For each 50 heat 
units or fraction thereof in excess of 14,800 per pound of dry coal 
the price per ton was increased 1 cent. The results of analyses of 
the bituminous coal purchased during 1915 are as follows: — 



Kind of Coal. 


Number 

of Samples 

tested. 


British 

Thermal 

Units. 


Percent- 
age of 
Volatile 
Matter. 


Percent- 
age 
of Ash. 


Percent- 
age of 
Moisture. 


Percent- 
age 
of Fixed 
Carbon. 


Alpha Special, 
Beaver Run, 
New River, . 
Brazil Smokeless, 
Davenport, . 
Ralphton, 
Carbon Forge, 




31 
25 
13 

6 
6 

4 
4 


14,817 
14,477 
14,840 
14,628 
14,872 
14,608 
14,402 


21.23 
16.68 
17.10 
20.44 
18.31 
16.56 
17.15 


6.37 

8.63 
6.11 
7.66 
6.03 
7.54 
9.08 


2.61 
3.13 
3.14 
1.99 

2.45 
2.62 
2.28 


72.40 
74.69 
76.79 
71.90 
75.66 
75.90 
73.77 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 

The quantity of water pumped at these stations into the southern 
high-service mains averaged 32,352,000 gallons per day during 1915, 
or 1,338,000 gallons per day less than in 1914. The cost per million 
gallons pumped was 45.67 cents less than in 1914. 

The southern high-service pumping statistics for 1915 are as 
follows: — 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), . 
Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Coal used (pounds), .... 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average lift (feet), 



Cost of pumping: — 
Labor, 
Fuel, . 
Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 



Totals, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 
Cost per million foot gallons, . 



Pumping Station 
No. 1. 



Engine 
No. 1. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



,000,000 
289.20 
792,000 
904,430 
319.76 
133.80 



52,710 62 

1,692 97 

360 40 

35 14 

44 73 



$4,843 86 

$16.7492 

.1252 



30,000,000 
2,898.99 
7,942,000 
1,893,530 
1,531.00 
119.38 



$7,254 88 

3,404 69 

1,045 33 

94 05 

119 71 



$11,918 66 

$4.1113 

.0344 



Pumping . 

Station 

No. 2. 



Engine 
No. 12. 



40,000,000 

8,620.42 

23,618,000 

5,788,640 

1,489.20 

123.26 



$8,660 37 

10,433 98 

695 30 

238 51 

83 88 



10,112 04 

$2.3331 

.0189 



Totals. 



78,000,000 
11,808.61 

32,352,000 

8,586,600 

1,375.24 

122.56 



$18,625 87 

15,531 64 

2,101 03 

367 70 

248 32 



3,874 56 

$3.1227 

.0255 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



71 



The quantity pumped into the low-service mains averaged 35,- 
403,000 gallons per day during 1915, or 837,000 gallons per day less 
than in 1914. The cost per million gallons pumped was 6.74 cents 
more than in 1914. 

The low-service pumping statistics for 1915 are as follows: — 



Daily pumping capacity each engine (gallons), 
Total quantity pumped (gallons), . 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), .... 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 
Average lift (feet), 

Cost of pumping: — 
Labor, .... 
Fuel, ■ , . . 
Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 

Total, . 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 
Cost per million foot gallons, . 



Chestnut Hill 

Pumping Station 

No. 2. — Engines 

Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

35,000,000 

12,922,060,000 

35,403,000 

4,527,085 

2,854.39 

40.34 



$19,149 51 

8,196 34 

2,328 01 

388 01 

152 39 

$30,164 26 

$2.3343 
.0579 



During September the track scale used for weighing coal received 
at the Chestnut Hill stations was overhauled and put in accurate ad- 
justment with the Fairbanks Company's 80,000-pound test car. All 
scales used for weighing the coal as fed to the boilers were tested 
and put in accurate adjustment. 



Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

At this station water is pumped for the northern high-service 
district. The quantity pumped averaged 6,778,000 gallons per day 
during 1915, or 589,000 gallons per day less than in 1914. The cost 
per million gallons pumped was 14.62 cents more than in 1914, 
although the total cost of pumping was $868.51 less than in 1914. 

The northern high-service pumping statistics for 1915 are as 
follows: — 

Total quantity pumped (gallons), 2,473,990,000 

Da% average quantity pumped (gallons), 6,778,000 

Total coal used (pounds), 2,209,787 



72 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 1,119.56 

Average lift (feet), 127.87 

Engine No. 8 operated (hours), 43 

Engine No. 9 operated (hours), 2,957 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 8 (gallons), .... 18,460,000 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 9 (gallons), .... 2,455,530,000 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, . . . . ■ . $9,389 84 

Fuel, 4,543 26 

Repairs, 234 64 

Oil, waste and packing, 183 15 

Small supplies, . 174 71 

Total for station, s $14,525 60 

Cost per million gallons pumped, . . . . . . . $5.8713 

Cost per million foot gallons, . 0459 



Arlington Pumping Station. 

At this station water is pumped for the northern extra high-service 
district. The quantity pumped averaged 687,000 gallons per day 
during 1915, or 31,000 gallons per day less than in 1914. The cost 
per million gallons pumped was $2.51 more than in 1914, the total 
increase in cost of operating the station in 1915 being $275.40. 

The northern extra high-service pumping statistics for 1915 are as 
follows : — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), . 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 10 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 11 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 10 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 11 (gallons), 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, . . . 

Small supplies, 

Total for station, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 
Cost per million foot gallons, . 



250,670,000 

687,000 

1,024,020 

244.79 

281.43 

5,712 

284 

241,540,000 

9,130,000 

$6,021 70 

1,964 63 

287 45 

62 55 

98 65 

$8,434 98 

$33.6497 
.1196 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 



Hyde Park Pumping Station. 

At this station water is pumped for the southern extra high-service 
district. The quantity pumped averaged 688,000 gallons per day 
during 1915, or 12,000 gallons per day less than in 1914. The cost 
per million gallons pumped was $1.08 less than in 1914, the total 
cost of pumping in 1915 being $403.53 less than in 1914. The saving 
was due largely to smaller expenditures for repairs and supplies. 

Water was pumped from this station to the new Bellevue Reser- 
voir between January 7 and 15, January 22 and March 25 and July 
1 and September 30, a total of 162 days. The old reservoir was also 
in use during these periods and during the remainder of the year. 

The southern extra high-service pumping statistics for 1915 are as 
follows: — 

Total quantity pumped (gallons), 250,970,000 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), ..... 688,000 

Total coal used (pounds), 504,706 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 497 . 26 

Average lift (feet), 122.83 

Engine No. 13 operated (hours), 1,169 

Engine No. 14 operated (hours), . .■ . . . 4,100 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 13 (gallons), . . ' . . 44,240,000 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 14 (gallons), .... 206,730,000 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, . $5,577 65 

Fuel, 965 75 

Repairs, 99 41 

Oil, waste and packing, 71 85 

Small supplies, '. 133 15 



Total for station, $6,847 81 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $27 . 2854 

Cost per million foot gallons, .2221 

Additional information regarding the operation of the pumping 
engines at these pumping stations is given on pages 164 to 172. 



74 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Consumption of Water. 

The average consumption of water in the 18 municipalities sup- 
plied from the Metropolitan Water Works during the year, as meas- 
ured by the Metropolitan Water Works meters, was 101,941,500 
gallons per day, which, on the basis of an estimated population of 
1,164,600, is equivalent to 88 gallons per capita per day. The total 
consumption in each of the municipalities in 1915 was less than in 
1914, with the exceptions of the city of Maiden and the town of 
Watertown, and the per capita consumption was less in 1915 than in 
1914 in all of the municipalities, with the exception that there was 
no change in the per capita consumption in Maiden and Watertown. 
The consumption in the municipalities supplied was 5,094,600 gallons 
per day less in 1915 than in 1914, or 4.76 per cent, less than the 1914 
consumption. This was probably due in large measure to climatic 
conditions, as there was no long period of extremely cold weather 
or of extremely hot dry weather during 1915, which would cause the 
consumption to be larger than usual. 

The diagram on page 76, showing population and consumption of 
water in the Metropolitan Water District since 1890, indicates that 
the reduction in the per capita use of water in 1915, due to the in- 
stallation of meters, resulted in saving more water than was required 
to supply the annual increase in the population, for the total con- 
sumption of the District has continued to diminish to a noticeable 
extent. 

The average rates of consumption of water in the various mu- 
nicipalities in 1915 during the entire day and during the three hours 
between 1 and 4 at night are shown on the diagram opposite page 
76. The average daily consumption of water in each of the mu- 
nicipalities supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during 
1914 and 1915, as measured by the Metropolitan Water Works 
meters, is as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



75 













Estimated 

Popula- 
tion, 1915. 




Average 


Daily Consumption. 






1914. 


1915. 






Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. l 


Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Decrease 
in 

Gallons. 


Boston, 


748,890 


81,877,800 


111 


77,651,800 


104 


4,226,000 


Somerville, 










87,320 


6,199,800 


73 


5,807,100 


67 


392,700 


Maiden, . 










49,160 


2,237,900 


46 


2,243,000 


46 


5,1002 


Chelsea, . 










43,750 


2,904,400 


70 


2,901,400 


66 


3,000 


Everett, . 










37,950 


2,688,100 


72 


2,599,100 


68 


89,000 


Quincy, . 










40,940 


2,609,200 


66 


2,511,800 


61 


97,400 


Medford, . 










30,820 


1,258,900 


43 


1,245,200 


40 


13,700 


Melrose, . 










16,960 


932,500 


56 


851,500 


50 


81,000 


Revere, 










25,500 


1,551,000 


64 


1,484,800 


58 


66,200 


Watertown, 










16,660 


984,800 


62 


1,025,200 


62 


40.400 2 


Arlington, 










15,050 


860,500 


60 


825,300 


55 


35,200 


Milton, 










8,650 


346,700 


41 


338,900 


39 


7,800 


Winthrop, 










12,900 


722,800 


58 


700,300 


54 


22,500 


Stoneham, 










7,510 


378,800 


51 


373,700 


50 


5,100 


Belmont, . 










8,180 


497,500 


65 


425,400 


52 


72,100 


Lexington, 










5,570 


373,800 


69 


358,700 


64 


15,100 


Nahant, . 










1,400 


171,600 


126 


161,900 


116 


9,700 


Swampscott, 










7,390 


440,000 


61 


436,400 


59 


3,600 


District, 


1,164,600 


107,036,100 


94 


101,941,500 


88 


5,094,600 



1 The populations for 1914 were revised after the census of 1915 became available, and consequently 
these per capita figures differ from the figures published in the 1914 report. 

2 Increase. 



The average consumption in the several districts was as follows : — 





Gallons 

per Day, 

1915. 


Decrease from 1914. 




Gallons 
per Day. 


Percent- 
age. 


Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of 
Boston, with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts 
of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, 
Charlestown and East Boston, ....... 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Watertown, 
the high-service districts of Boston, and portions of Belmont 
and Milton, . . . . 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Win- 
throp, Swampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service 
districts of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and 
East Boston, 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury, .... 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington and Belmont, .... 


41,976,400 
19,428,700 
31,775,400 

7,398,200 
668,000 
694,800 


3,376,700 

1,063,800 

409,800 

138,000 
77,400 
28,900 


7.45 
5.19 
1.27 

1.83 

10.38 

3.99 


Totals 


101,941,500 


5,094,600 


4.76 



76 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



POPULATION and CONSUMPTION OF WATER 

IN THE — 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 

AS SUPPLIED IN 1915 

FROM 1890 TO 1915 



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AND 

FOR THREE HOURS BETWEEN I AND 4 AT NIGHT 



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^m 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



77 



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78 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Installation of Meters on Service Pipes. 

The results accomplished in the municipalities supplied with water 
from the Metropolitan Works, under chapter 524 of the Acts of the 
year 1907, which requires that each year meters shall be set on all new 
service pipes and on 5 per cent, of all service pipes that were without 
meters on December 31, 1907, are shown by the table on page 77. 

The number of meters set on old services to December 31, 1915, 
by all of the municipalities is in excess of the number required to be 
set at this date by the statute, although the number set each year 
has not always been in accordance therewith. Making allowance 
for the fact that new services are not always put into use when in- 
stalled, the number of new meters set on new services appears to be 
in accordance with the requirements of the statute with the excep- 
tion that the cities of Boston, Maiden, Quincy and Revere and the 
town of Watertown have not fully complied with the law. 

In 12 of the municipalities practically all of the service pipes have 
now been equipped with meters. There has been an increase of 
9,821 in the number of meters in use on service pipes in the munici- 
palities supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during the 
year, and 66.81 per cent, of all the service pipes had been provided 
with meters at the close of the year. 

Water supplied Outside of Metropolitan Water District. 

During the year 406,774,000 gallons of water were supplied from 
the Metropolitan Water Works for use outside of the Metropolitan 
Water District as follows : — 



Places supplied. 



Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 



Average 

Quantity 

(Gallons 

per Day). 1 



Number of 

Days on 

which Water 

was 

supplied. 



Amounts 

charged 

for Water 

supplied. 



City of Worcester, . 
Westborough State Hospital, . 
Town of Framingham : — 

From Sudbury Aqueduct, . 

From Filter-gallery at Farm Pond, 
United States Government: — 

Peddock's Island, 
Town of Saugus, .... 



46,800,000 
68,602,000 

57,400,000 
228,600,000 

28,152,000 
5,372,000 



128,219 
188,000 

157,260 
626,301 

77,100 
14,700 



21 
365 

306 
365 

365 
365 



$1,357 20 
2,058 06 

1,816 01 

1,770 46 
300 00 



1 For the entire year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 79 



Quality of the Water. 

The quality of the water supplied during 1915 has been substan- 
tially the same as during the past few years. The yearly average 
results of the chemical analyses made by the State Department of 
Health and of the biological and bacteriological examinations made 
by this department of water from service taps in Boston since 1898 
are given in tables on pages 185 to 188. 

Sanitary Conditions on Watersheds. 

The inspection of the watersheds for the purpose of preventing the 
pollution of the water has been continued as in former years. In 
connection with this work the information for the sanitary census, 
which is taken every five years, has been obtained and the statistics 
for 1915, together with a summary of the statistics of the previous 
census in 1910, for comparison, are given in the following tables. 
Tables containing a summary of the work of sanitary inspection 
during the year are also given. 



80 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 









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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



83 






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84 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Wachusett Watershed. 

In 1913 the city of Worcester completed the Kendall Reservoir 
and diverted the water from 9.35 square miles of the Wachusett 
watershed. The premises upon this area are not included in the 1915 
census. Since 1910 premises to the number of 179 have been de- 
stroyed by fire, abandoned, removed or diverted, and 184 new 
premises have been constructed, making a net increase of 5 in the 
total number of premises. The permanent population has increased 
nearly 9 per cent, and is now 5,745, *or 52.8 per square mile as com- 
pared with 44.7 in 1910. This increase is largely due to industrial 
conditions which were bad in 1910 and good this year, and to a 
steady growth in Holden Centre and West Boylston, where business 
people from Worcester are building residences. Seventeen new houses 
were built in these two towns the past year. At present all the mills 
except those at Lovellville, Dawsonville and Warren's tannery are 
operating at full capacity. The mill at Dawsonville has been vacant 
throughout the year, but it was recently bought by the Stoughton 
Mills Company which is intending to manufacture cloth at this mill. 
The tenements have been repaired and plans are being made to start 
the mill early in 1916. 

There has been a material decrease in summer residences and pop- 
ulation, due to the diversion of 12 cottages in the Asnebumskit 
Brook district, and a reduction of 57 by fire* and removal in the 
Waushacum district. Farming upon a large scale is decreasing and 
the number of domestic animals grows less every year, with the ex- 
ception of poultry, which has increased from 36,073 to 44,358, or 
nearly 23 per cent, since 1910. 

Sanitary conditions upon the watershed show a steady improve- 
ment, as indicated by the reduction in the number of unsatisfactory 
cases. At the end of 1905 the number was 195, in 1910, 61, and in 
1915, 47. 

There have been only three cases of typhoid fever reported during 
the year; one in West Boylston, one in Holden and one in Princeton. 
In all cases there were proper cesspools and precautions were taken 
to prevent any contamination of the water supply. 

The Jefferson Manufacturing Company has made extensive repairs 
to its tenements and has improved their sanitary condition in several 
cases by building new cesspools, turning surface drains into aban- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 85 

doned wells and replacing old surface privies with concrete vaults. 
At the lower mill the sewer line from the water closets has been re- 
laid under the direction of an engineer and the closets are again in 
use. The Summit House in the Muschopauge district, a popular 
summer resort, was destroyed by fire in August. 

Sudbury Watershed. 

There has been an increase of 875 in the population on the Sud- 
bury watershed, or 4 per cent, since 1910. There has been a decrease 
of 4.3 per cent, or 5.6 per square mile in the number of people 
residing in houses not connected with sewers conveying the drainage 
outside the watershed. The number of premises where the sink 
drainage runs upon the surface of the ground has been reduced from 
694 to 516. The unsatisfactory cases have been reduced from 65 to 
41. Farming operations are on the decline. There has been a de- 
crease in the number of domestic animals, with the exception of 
poultry, which has increased over 28 per cent. 

There were 8 cases of typhoid fever reported on the watershed 
during the year; 5 in Marlborough and 1 each in Westborough, 
Southborough and Ashland. In all cases precautions were taken to 
prevent the pollution of the water. 

Cochituate Watershed. 

There has been an increase of 2,393 in the population on the 
Cochituate watershed, or 16 per cent, since 1910. Early in 1911 the 
drainage from 0.22 of a square mile of the Snake Brook watershed, 
which includes the most densely populated part of Cochituate Vil- 
lage, was diverted from the Cochituate watershed. On this area 
there were 146 premises with a population of 707 in 1910. In 1913 
Mr. Charles W. Dean moved his business from Cochituate to his 
new shoe shop in Natick, and to-day there is no manufacturing in 
the village. The decrease in population resulting from these changes 
was 852. There has been a decrease of 17.2 per cent, or 42.2 per 
square mile in the number of people residing in houses not connected 
with the sewers. The number of premises where the sink drainage 
runs upon the surface of the ground has been reduced from 205 to 
174 and the unsatisfactory cases have been reduced from 39 to 7. 
Poultry has increased nearly 43 per cent, on this watershed but the 
number of all other domestic animals has been materially reduced. 



86 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

There were 7 cases of typhoid fever reported on this watershed 
during the year; 5 in Framingham and 2 in Natick. All necessary 
precautions were taken to prevent the pollution of the water. 

Protection of the Water Supply by Filtration. 

On the Wachusett watershed the surface water from an area of 
525 acres in the village of Sterling has been filtered at the Sterling 
filter-beds before being discharged into a water course from which it 
finally enters the Wachusett Reservoir. The sewage from the Worces- 
ter County Training School has been purified at the filter-beds on 
Beaman Street in West Boylston. The sewage from the summer 
residences at Gates Terrace, just outside the camp grounds at Ster- 
ling Junction, was filtered from April 14 to November 6. The cost 
of maintaining all of these filters was $762.94. 

On the Sudbury watershed the surface water from an area of 2 
square miles of the thickly settled portion of the city of Marlborough 
has been filtered at the Marlborough Brook filter-beds before enter- 
ing the Sudbury Reservoir, with the exception of about 5,800,000 
gallons on January 18 and 19. Diluted sewage from the Marl- 
borough main sewer was received at the combined storage and filter- 
bed on Farm Street on August 4 and 5, and ground water from the 
sewer underdrain on August 6 and 7 and from August 22 to 28. The 
cost of maintaining the filters was $2,194.09. 

On the Cochituate watershed the surface water from an area of 
about 1 square mile of the thickly settled portion of the town of 
Natick was pumped to filter-beds and filtered before entering Lake 
Cochituate, with the exception of 1,100,000 gallons from Pegan 
Brook on January 18, and the overflow from the intercepting ditch 
on 7 days in January, 7 days in February, 1 day in July, 4 days in 
August and 1 day in December, amounting to 30,100,000 gallons. 
The pumping station was operated during 272 days and 404,405,000 
gallons, equivalent to an average of 1,108,000 gallons per day for the 
entire year, was pumped to the filters. The cost of operating the 
pumping station and maintaining the filters was $3,965.78, which is 
equivalent to a cost of $9.81 per million gallons filtered. 

Since July 1 in all cases where the surface water flow exceeded the 
capacity of the filters and water flowed into the reservoirs without 
filtration, the unfiltered water was sterilized with a solution of cal- 
cium hypochlorite, which is now kept on hand at all filters for this 
purpose. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 87 



Improvement of Watersheds. 

The ditches which are maintained in the swamps on the water- 
sheds for improving the quality of the water, have been cleaned and 
the weeds and brush mowed for a width of 10 to 20 feet on both 
sides. The total length of these ditches is 36.40 miles, of which 27.46 
miles have been cared for by the Wachusett Department at a cost 
of $1,502.55, and the remaining 8.94 miles have been cared for by the 
Sudbury Department at a cost of $348.00. 

For the protection of the water supply 80.256 acres of land have 
been acquired in the Wachusett watershed in Holden, Sterling and 
West Boylston, including the picnic grounds on Middle Waushacum 
Pond in Sterling, and 2.498 acres of land have been acquired in that 
portion of West Boylston known as "The Settlement" for the pro- 
posed improvement of Gates Brook. A preliminary ditch has been 
excavated at this place for a length of 500 feet at a cost of $313.44. 

For the protection of the water supply on the Sudbury watershed 
14.74 acres of land were acquired at Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
in Framingham and 3.50 acres at Whitehall Reservoir in Hopkinton. 

Forestry. 

Wachusett Department. 

About 78 acres of land covered with undesirable trees and brush 
was cleared, preparatory to planting, at a net cost of $914.64. At a 
cost of $1,502.52, about 140 acres of the reservoir marginal lands 
was planted with 171,900 three and four-year-old white pine seed- 
lings from our Oakdale nursery, about one-half of which was raised 
from seed, the remainder being received from the State nursery at 
Amherst when one year old. 

In connection with the plan to establish shade trees along our 
property on the highways bordering the reservoir, 1,022 sugar maple 
saplings were set out along 6J miles of highway, to replace trees set 
out in former years that had failed. The saplings were obtained 
from the woods on our property and the cost of the work was 
$421.63. 

Undesirable trees and other growth were cut from 180 acres of 
land where we have a growth of young white pines from 5 to 8 years 
old at a cost of $10.36 per acre. Undesirable trees were cut from an 
area of about 11 acres grown to chestnut, red and white oak and 



88 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

white birch at a cost of $41.50 per acre. Undesirable trees and 
underbrush were cut on a strip about 100 feet in width along the 
Clinton-Boylston highway in Boylston, for a distance of 3.8 miles 
at a cost of $1,440.17, and 450 feet of new forest road was con- 
structed and 950 feet of old forest road repaired for use as access 
roads to white pine plantings and wooded areas. 

The expenditures for protecting the wooded areas from gypsy 
moths, the pine tree weevil and tent caterpillars were $2,996.94, and 
the net cost of the work of combating the chestnut bark disease was 
$304.31. 

The necessary care has been given to both the Oakdale and North 
Dike nurseries and at the end of the year they contained the follow- 
ing trees: — 

Oakdale Nursery, area 3.9 acres: — 

1-year-old white pine seedlings, in seed beds, . . . 50,350 

4-year-old white spruce, in transplant beds, . . ■ . 13,550 

1-year-old Norway pines, 215 

3-year-old red pines, . . 215 

4-year-old sequoias, 120 

64,450 

North Dike Nursery, area 2.0 acres: — 

3- year-old white pines (Amherst stock), .... 96,800 
3-year-old white pines (Keene stock), 14,400 

111,200 

175,650 

Fire patrol service was maintained throughout the marginal lands 
of the Wachusett Reservoir on Sundays and holidays during the 
spring and fall of the year for the protection of the improved tim- 
ber stands and young white pine forests. No fires of any conse- 
quence occurred on Water Works property, but two fires on adjacent 
property threatened serious damage and but for the efficiency of the 
power sprayer as a fire-fighting apparatus would undoubtedly have 
caused considerable damage. 

About 55 acres of Wachusett Aqueduct land bordering on the open 
channel, which was grown to scrub, sprout, briers and weeds was 
cleared and planted with 52,575 3-year-old white pine seedlings and 
10,800 spruce seedlings raised in the Oakdale nursery. The prepara- 
tory clearing cost $885.39, the planting of the trees $533.32, and 
during the past fall the brush and weeds have been mowed from the 
area at a cost of $455.69. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 89 

Sudbury Department. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir about 500 feet of forest road was cut 
on Pine Hill, and at the nursery the beds have been kept free from 
weeds and a fire guard has been kept plowed and harrowed around 
the beds. 

Early in the spring 1| acres of newly plowed land was prepared for 
transplanting seedlings from the State nursery at Amherst. There 
are now in the nursery 56,000 4-year-old pines and 50,000 2-year-old 
spruce seedlings which will be ready for transplanting next spring. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir 57 acres of land was cleared of trees 
and brush for planting, 6 acres at the Ashland Reservoir and 3 acres 
at Lake Cocbituate. The area cleared at the Ashland Reservoir was 
covered with a small growth of chestnut trees infested with the 
chestnut bark disease. 

During the year plantings were made as follows: — 

At Sudbury Reservoir 36,600 3-year-old seedlings were set out 
from the nursery and 29,875 4 -year-old seedlings were set out as 
received from Amherst; at Framingham Reservoir No. 3 600 white 
pine seedlings were set out on the Hessel and Parker lands; at Ash- 
land Reservoir 1,500 white pine seedlings from the Sudbury nursery 
were set out at the head of the reservoir, and 9,000 3-year-old pine 
seedlings from the Sudbury nursery and 5,300 from the State nursery 
were set out at Hopkinton Reservoir below the dam. At Lake 
Cochituate 700 small pines and 2,500 4-year-old seedlings were set 
out as received from Amherst on the north shore of Snake Brook. 
On the Sudbury Aqueduct land 150 pines were set out on the slope 
of the cut near Duncklee Street in Newton in connection with the 
improvement of the land at this place. On the Cochituate Aque- 
duct land there were planted 14,000 3-year-old pines from the nurs- 
ery at Sudbury Reservoir and 6,250 4-year-old pines as received 
from the State nursery at Amherst along both slopes of the aqueduct 
between Morse's Pond and the Boston & Albany Railroad. On the 
Weston Aqueduct there were planted 850 3-year-old pines at the 
White place in Nobscot and 2,000 east and west of School Street in 
Way land from the Sudbury nursery, and 2,350 4-year-old pines east 
of Millwood Street in Framingham, 1,625 at the White place and 
10,300 in the sand pit near Gaging Chamber No. 2 as received from 
Amherst. 



90 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The expenditures for protecting the wooded areas on the reservoir 
and aqueduct lands from gypsy and browntail moths and tent cater- 
pillars and the pine tree weevil at Sudbury and Ashland reservoirs 
were $3,053.05. 

There were 19 fires in the lands in the Sudbury Department, all of 
which occurred during extremely dry weather in March and April. 
Several were caused by sparks from locomotives, several by fires 
spreading from adjacent lands which were being burned over and 
one by sparks from a steam road roller. The cause of the others is 
not known. The total damage was a loss of 18,700 white pines 3 to 
5 years old, 100 arbor-vitse trees, several small chestnut and oak 
trees and about 1,000 feet of old fence boards and hard pine plank. 



Distribution Department. 

Gypsy and browntail moths and elm leaf beetles have been de- 
stroyed on the Water Works lands at the distribution reservoirs. 
The expenditures for this work were $2,880.09. Some planting has 
been done at the Chestnut Hill, Weston, Spot Pond and Fisher Hill 
reservoirs. 

Distribution Reservoirs. 

The locations, capacities and elevations of the distribution reser- 
voirs of the Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following 
table : — ■ 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations. 


Elevation of x 
High Water. 


Capacity in 
Gallons. 


Low Service: — 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton District of Boston, 

Northern High Service: — 

Northern Extra High Service: — 
Southern High Service: — 

Southern Extra High Service: — 
Bellevue Reservoir Steel Tank, West Roxbury District of Boston, . 


1£3.00 
134.00 
200.00 
157.00 

271.00 
300.00 

442.00 

251.00 
264.50 
192.00 
251.00 

375.00 


1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

26,200,000 

41,400,000 
2,450,000 

550,000 

15,500,000 

13,500,000 

5,100,000 

330,000 

2,500,000 




- 


2,399,230,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 



By arrangement with the city of Chelsea a portion of the main- 
tenance of its reservoir on Powder Horn Hill is assumed by the 
department, and the reservoir is used by the department when neces- 
sary in connection with the supplying of water to the northern high- 
service district. This reservoir has a capacity of 1,000,000 gallons 
with high-water line at elevation 196.6. 

Water is delivered into the Chestnut Hill Reservoir from the 
storage reservoirs by gravity through masonry aqueducts and is 
pumped from this reservoir into the low-service pipe lines and reser- 
voirs and into the southern high-service pipe lines and reservoirs. 

Water is delivered into the Weston Reservoir through the Weston 
Aqueduct by gravity and is delivered from this reservoir into the 
low-service district without pumping. 

Water for the northern high-service district is pumped from Spot 
Pond to the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs. For the northern extra 
high-service district it is pumped from the low-service pipe lines to 
the steel tank at Arlington Heights and for the southern extra high- 
service it is pumped from the southern high-service pipe lines to the 
steel tank on Bellevue Hill in West Roxbury. 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs. 

On account of the adjacent locations of the Chestnut Hill, Fisher 
Hill and Waban Hill reservoirs the grounds and structures at these 
reservoirs are maintained by a force with headquarters at the Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir. At the- Chestnut Hill and Waban Hill reservoirs 
the gate-houses were cleaned and painted on the inside and the ex- 
terior woodwork was painted where necessary, and considerable work 
was done in resurfacing walks and haying. 

At the Chestnut Hill Reservoir the Lawrence basin has not been 
used during the year. The driveways have been resurfaced, the lower 
section of the Cochituate Aqueduct 3,000 feet in length, from the 
intermediate gate-house to Webber's waste-weir, was cleaned in 
October, and for renewing the fence along Beacon Street 104 rein- 
forced concrete fence posts have been made. The cost of patrolling 
the shores of this reservoir to prevent pollution of the water by the 
large number of people who visit the reservoir in summer was 
$572.98. 

The Fisher Hill Reservoir was in use throughout the year. The 
grounds and gate-houses have received the usual attention. 



92 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Weston Reservoir. 

The attendant and three men have been employed at this reservoir 
the greater part of the year and the usual work of caring for the 
gate-houses and screens, disposing of leaves, weeding ditches and 
beaches was performed. A heavy growth of water grass was removed 
from the open channel at the upper end of the reservoir. 

George Mackie, the attendant at this reservoir since October, 
1905, was accidentally drowned in the screen chamber April 12. The 
covers of the screen well were left off by one of his assistants during 
the afternoon and Mr. Mackie entering the screen chamber about 
nine o'clock in the evening without a light walked into the open 
well. His body was recovered from the aqueduct the following day 
about 65 feet from the screen chamber. Ephraim A. Desmond, who 
had formerly been employed as Mr. Mackie's assistant, has been in 
charge of the work since his death. Mrs. Mackie continued to live 
in the attendant's house until July 12; since then the house has not 
been occupied. 

Electric service has now been installed at the screen chamber. 
The wiring is arranged so that unlocking the door lights four electric 
lamps; three other lamps, controlled by a switch, were installed to 
furnish additional light in the interior of the chamber. Two lamps 
are also provided at the two exterior corners of the building near the 
reservoir to furnish illumination when skimming leaves from the 
surface of the water at the inlet to the screen chamber. The cost of 
the installation was $505.11. 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 

These reservoirs are located near together in the Middlesex Fells 
Reservation of the Metropolitan Park System and are maintained 
by a force with headquarters at Spot Pond. The interiors of all the 
gate-houses have been cleaned and painted during the year. At 
Spot Pond 28 new screens have been made for use in the easterly 
gate-house. Considerable time has been spent cutting out trees and 
underbrush from wooded areas and repairing the riprap at Spot 
Pond. Two fires occurred on the Water Works land during the year 
which were promptly extinguished, and practically no damage re- 
sulted therefrom. The cost of patrolling the lands to prevent pollu- 
tion of the water supply by the large number of people who visit 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

the shores of the reservoirs during the summer was $1,294.86. The 
motor boat was used and blank cartridges were fired to drive off the 
ducks and gulls which frequent Spot Pond. They were in largest 
number in December, when 2,200 ducks and 1,950 gulls were on 
the pond in one week. 

During October and November 1,730 feet of 15-inch and 450 feet 
of 12-inch vitrified clay pipe and 295 feet of open channel were con- 
structed to divert from Spot Pond to Quarter Mile Pond the surface 
water drainage from an area of 38 acres of land located east of the 
pond near the New England Sanitarium, a large portion of which 
was under cultivation. The work was done under a contract with 
Thomas Russo & Company, and cost $3,683.22. A parcel of land 
containing 2.124 acres, located on the easterly side of Woodland 
Road and included in the diverted area, was purchased from William 
L. Henry in August. 

Arlington, Bellevue, Forbes Hill and Mystic Reservoirs. 

The new steel tank on Bellevue Hill was put into service January 
22 and remained in use until March 25 when it was drained for 
painting. It was in service again from July 3 to September 30 and 
has since been out of service in connection with the construction of 
the masonry tower around the tank. 

The Mystic Reservoir has not been used during the year. It was 
cleaned between May 30 and June 15 and 128 cubic yards of sedi- 
ment was removed at a cost of $586.42. 

The other distribution reservoirs were given the usual attention. 

Distribution Pipe Lines. 
The length of the distribution pipe lines owned and operated by the 
department at the close of the year is 122.24 miles, which is an in- 
crease of 3.19 miles during the year. 

Extensions and Relocations by Maintenance Force. 
The 48-inch main in Clinton Road, Brookline, was lowered for a 
distance of 348 feet so that the cover over the top of the pipe bells 
is now at least 3 feet, where it was formerly 1J to 2 J feet, at a cost 
of $1,504.79, which was paid by the town of Brookline in considera- 
tion for permission to lay out Clinton Road in the Water Works 
land over the pipe line. 



94 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

A 4-inch connection, provided with a 4-inch x 2-inch Hersey de- 
tector meter, was installed at the junction of South and Main 
streets in Stoneham, and a 4-inch fire pipe was laid at Wellington 
Bridge in Somerville for the Metropolitan Park Commission. 

Pipe Bridges. 
Substantial repairs have been made in the pipe bridges over steam 
railroad tracks at College Avenue in Medford and Massachusetts 
Avenue in Cambridge, and minor repairs have been made at other 
pipe bridges. At the pipe bridge on Chestnut Hill Avenue in Brook- 
line, which was repaired in 1914, the 36-inch pipe has been enclosed 
in a wooden box. 

Breaks and Leaks. 

On August 16 a spherical joint in the 12-inch flexible jointed pipe 
line under the Neponset River at West Street, in Hyde Park, opened 
in the channel which had been dredged by the State Department of 
Health early in the year, producing a vigorous leak which neces- 
sitated shutting off the main and pumping the water for the Milton 
southern extra high-service through the city of Boston mains in 
Hyde Park for a period of ten days. The pipes were pulled into 
position by means of cables connected to two differential blocks 
anchored on shore and the joint was recalked by a diver. The cost 
of the work was $458.73. 

On November 6 a break occurred in the 48-inch Weston Aqueduct 
Supply Main in Commonwealth Avenue at Auburn Street, Newton. 
This pipe was laid in 1902 in deep cut, the bottom of which was in 
ledge rock, and the cover over the top of the pipe was 14 feet. The 
pipe was crushed by the heavy weight above being concentrated on the 
small bearing surface where the pipe rested upon a projecting point 
of rock which was not excavated to a sufficient depth when the pipe 
was laid. The water from the break flooded the street to a depth of 
about 2 feet and entered the cellars of six houses and the basement 
of a church to a depth of from a few inches to several feet. In mak- 
ing repairs concrete was built up around the lower half of the pipe 
to distribute the weight evenly over a large bearing surface. All 
damages resulting from the break have been repaired with the ex- 
ception of some seeding and cleaning up of lawns, which has been 
deferred until spring. The total expenditures on account of the 
break amount to $4,692.41. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 95 

On November 9 a break occurred in the 6-inch cement main in 
the Metropolitan Water Works land near the old Mystic Pumping 
Station in Somerville. The cost of repairs was $83.62. 

There were 14 leaks at wooden joints and 21 at lead joints which 
cost $1,262.41 for repairs. 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gages. 

There are now 59 Venturi meters, ranging in size from 6 inches 
to 48 inches in diameter, 5 4-inch and 6-inch detector, 3 disc and 1 
torrent Hersey meters installed for use in measuring the quantity of 
water supplied from the distribution pipe lines. The 8 pressure 
regulating valves, installed for use in reducing the pressure of the 
water delivered to portions of Chelsea, East Boston and Hyde Park, 
and to Nahant, Revere, Swampscott and Winthrop have been kept 
in good order. Recording pressure gages have been maintained at 
22 stations on the Metropolitan Water Works, and the table on page 
196, showing elevation of the hydraulic grade line in feet above 
Boston City Base at these stations for each month during the year, 
has been prepared from the charts. 

Electrolysis. 

Electric measurements to determine the probable extent of elec- 
trolytic action upon our pipes were taken over the entire distribution 
system during the latter part of the year. As in former years, the 
results show differences of electric potential and electric currents of 
considerable magnitude resulting from the operations of the electric 
railways. No excavations have been made during the year to deter- 
mine the extent of the electrolytic corrosion of the pipes, but the 
policy has been continued of installing wooden insulating joints 
about 500 feet apart on all new pipe lines to prevent the accumula- 
tion of large electric currents on the pipes. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works. 

Pumping Station. 
The Clinton sewerage pumping station was operated throughout 
the year. The quantity of sewage pumped to the filter-beds averaged 
941,000 gallons per day, which is 81,000 gallons per day less than 
in 1914. This reduction is probably due in large measure to the 
ground water leakage into the sewers being less in 1915 than in 



96 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

1914. All of the pumping was done with the motor-driven 12-inch 
DeLaval centrifugal pump. New cast-iron moving and stationary 
rings were installed in the pump February 25, May 6 and December 
1. A spare composition runner and steel shaft were purchased for 
use in case of accident and when making repairs. 

The Clinton sewerage pumping statistics are as follows : — 

Total pumpage (gallons), ■ ". 343,612,000 

Average pumpage (gallons per day), 941,000 

Electric energy used (kilowatt hours), 113,008 

Pumpage per kilowatt hour (gallons), 3,041 

Average lift (feet), 47.5 

Efficiency of pumpiug unit and transmission line (per cent.), . . 50.5 

Coal used for burning sludge and heating (pounds), . . . 85,800 
Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, $1,123 00 

Electric energy at $5.30 per thousand kilowatt hours, . . . 598 94 

Coal for burning sludge and heating, 194 92 

Repairs and supplies, 304 31 

Total for station, . . . $2,221 17 

Cost per million gallons, $6 . 46 

Cost per million foot gallons, . 136 

Filters. 
The filter-beds and settling basins were operated from January 1 
to April 10 and from October 20 to December 31 in practically the 
same manner as during the preceding 7§ years, which was to allow 
sedimentation to take place in the 8 settling basins before applying 
the sewage to the filters. During this period only 2 basins were used 
at a time, each pair being used continuously for about one month, 
the effluent being applied to the 25 1-acre filter-beds at regular in- 
tervals. From April 10 to October 20 the settling basins were dis- 
continued and sewage was applied directly to the sand filters. The 
sewage received at the beginning and end of each day's operation, 
which contained a larger proportion of suspended matter than the 
remainder of the sewage, was applied to the beds located at the 
greatest distance from the nearby highway. This arrangement was 
followed to see if the odor from the sewage, which was the cause of 
complaints during the previous summer by persons passing along the 
highway, would be eliminated, as it was believed that the odors 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



97 



resulted from the decomposition of the sewage in the settling basins. 
The odors were practically eliminated by this operation but the 
efficiency of filtration appears to have been reduced while the cost 
of operation has been increased. 

The average results of chemical analyses of the sewage and effluent 
from the filters for the four years 1906 to 1909, inclusive, prior to 
the construction of the additional underdrains and of the distribu- 
tors at the filters, for the four years 1911 to 1914, inclusive, after 
the improvements were completed, for 1914 when the settling basins 
were used throughout the year and for 1915 with the settling basins 
out of service during the summer, are given in the following table : — 

[Parts per 100,000.] 









Average 
of Four 
Years, 
1906-09. 


Average 

of Four 

Years, 

1911-14. 


1914. 


1915. 




July to 
Decem- 
ber. 


Whole 
Year. 


Janu- 
ary to 
June. 


July to 
Decem- 
ber. 


Whole 
Year. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, 


.7540 


1.3125 


1.6233 


1.3775 


1.4733 


1.3967 


1.4350 


Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 




.0768 


.06225 


.0396 


.0758 


.1150 


.0719 


.09347 






89.7 


95 


96 


94 


92 


95 


93.5 


Oxygen consumed, sewage, 






7.045 


10.3208 


12.3000 


10.825 


11.2333 


7.833 


9.5333 


Oxygen consumed, effluent, 






1.085 


.61765 


.4434 


.5786 


1.1700 


- 


- 


Reduction, per cent., 






83.5 


94 


96 


94.5 


90 


- 


- 


Free ammonia, sewage, . 






4.1617 


4.60718 


4.4483 


4.1658 


4.4800 


3.0933 


3.7867 


Free ammonia, effluent, . 






1.3134 


.48038 


.1070 


.3345 


.7615 


.4234 


.5924 


Reduction, per cent., 






67.5 


90 


98 


92 


83 


86 


84 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, 




.1724 


1.13698 


1.4980 


1.0559 


.7322 


.6982 


.7152 






1 9807 


.2620 


.0306 


.0802 


.2373 


.3790 


.30815 



The cost of maintaining the filter-beds during 1915 was as fol- 
lows: — 

Labor, $5,033 72 

Supplies and expenses, 222 35 

$5,256 07 

Cost per million gallons filtered, . . $15 31 



98 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Wachusett Power Station. 

The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam was op- 
erated during 241 days. The output has varied from the minimum 
amount which the Connecticut River Transmission Company is re- 
quired to take under its contract up to the full capacity of the 
plant. Of the total quantity of water discharged into the Wachusett 
Aqueduct 90.2 per cent, was used for the development of energy. 
The power station statistics are as follows: — 

Energy sold to Connecticut River Transmission Company (kilo- 
watt hours), 4,825,541 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), .... 12,261 

Energy used at sewerage pumping station (kilowatt hours), . 113,008 



Total energy (kilowatt hours), 4,950,810 

Water used (gallons), 23,151,700,000 

Average effective head (feet), 89.6 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours), -. 2.3866 

Efficiency of station (per cent.), 75.95 

Earnings : — 

Energy supplied Connecticut River Transmis- 
sion Company at $5.30 per thousand kilowatt 
hours, $25,575 37 

Labor supplied Connecticut River Transmission 
Company, 13 00 

Energy used at the power station and at the 
sewerage pumping station, credited at $5.30 
per thousand kilowatt hours, .... 663 92 

$26,252 29 

Cost of operating station: — 

Labor, $4,804 13 

Fuel for heating building, 75 00 

Repairs and appliances, 446 34 

Taxes, 2,800 00 

8,125 47 

Net earnings, $18,126 82 

Net earnings per thousand kilowatt hours developed, ... $3 . 661 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 99 



Engineering. 

The engineering force has made studies, plans and estimates for 
various projects and improvements that have been considered during 
the year in connection with the maintenance of the works, and has 
also made surveys and plans of sanitary conditions at premises on 
the Wachusett watershed, surveys and plans for land purchases and 
takings, record plans of Water Works lands and structures, current 
meter gagings, tests of meters and analyses of coal and oil. The 
yields of the watersheds have been calculated, hydraulic and meteor- 
ological and other records have been kept, and the recording pressure 
gages have been cared for. 

Appended to this report are tables giving the amount of work 
done and other information relative to contracts, a statement of 
cement tests, a series of tables relating to the maintenance of the 
Metropolitan Water Works, including the rainfall, yield of sources 
of supply, consumption of water in the different districts, the num- 
ber of service pipes, meters and fire hydrants in the Metropolitan 
Water District, and a summary of statistics for the year 1915. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Boston, January 1, 1916. 



WILLIAM E. FOSS, 

Acting Chief Engineer. 



100 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen: — The following report of the operations of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 1915, is 
respectfully submitted : — 

Organization. 

The Engineer has charge of the design and construction of all new 
works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works con- 
trolled by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for removing 
sewage from the twenty-five municipalities which comprise the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Districts. 

The Engineer has had the following assistants: — 

Henry T. Stiff, . . . . . . Division Engineer, in charge of office and 

drafting room and of the construction 
work. 

Clarence A. Moore, . . .. Assistant Engineer, in charge of main- 
tenance studies and records and of con- 
struction work on the North Metro- 
politan System. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, . . . Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey 

work and field work in connection with 
the Wellesley extension construction. 

Ralph W. Loud, Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey 

work and field work in connection with 
the Wellesley extension construction. 

George W. Wood, .... Assistant Engineer, on Maiden River 

siphon and Deer Island extension. 

In addition to the above, the number of engineering and other 
assistants employed during the year was 17, which includes 2 in- 
strumentmen, 6 inspectors, 3 draftsmen, 4 rodmen and engineering 
assistants and 2 stenographers. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



101 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 

Areas and Populations. 

During the year the town of Wellesley has been admitted to the 
South Metropolitan Sewerage District, as provided in Chapter 343 
of the Acts of 1914. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, 
are based on the census of 1915. 



Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations 
within the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, as of December 81, 1915. 



City or^Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



Estimated 
Population. 



o 

Q 

■** 
u 
o 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston (portions of), 

Cambridge, . 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington, 1 . 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Revere, 

Somerville, . 

Stoneham, . 

Wakefield, . 

Winchester, . 

Winthrop, 

Woburn, 



o o 



<" to 
O 



Boston (portions^of), 

Brookline, 

Dedham, 1 

Milton, 

Newton, 

Quincy, 

Waltham, 

Watertown, . 

Wellesley, 



Totals, 



5.20 
4.66 
3.45 
6.11 
2.24 
3.34 
5.11 
5.07 
8.35 
3.73 
5.86 
3.96 
5.50 
7.65 
5'. 95 
1.61 
12.71 



24.96 

6.81 

9.40 

12.59 

16.88 

12.56 

13.63 

4.04 

9.89 



90.50 



110.76 



15,360 

8,370 

108,080 

109,660 

44,380 

38,410 

. 4,520 

49,660 

31,450 

17,110 

26,140 

88,260 

7,550 

12,980 

10,170 

13,180 

16,530 



245,170 
34,250 
11,180 
8,750 
43,620 
41,490 
30,540 
16,970 
6,610 



601,810 



201.26 



438,580 
1,040,390 



1 Part of town. 



102 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 
Seweks Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

During the year there have been built 1.695 miles of Metropolitan 
sewer within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 108.830 
miles of Metropolitan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, 
with the Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities 
and towns of the districts, the remaining 99.188 miles of sewers and 
other works having been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public and 
special connections with the systems : — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







| 


i i 

© S • 


Special Connections. 






§ 


g 0)OS 




flfl 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


.3 




Character or Location of 


2 








ublic 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


30 






h5 


Ph 




'A 


Boston: — 












Deer Island, 


5'0"to9' 0", . 


1.402 


4 
[ 


Shoe factory, . . ... 


1 


East Boston, 


9'0"tol'0", . 


5.467 


25- 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 

Co., 

Navy Yard, .... 


1 

8 


Charlestown, 


6' 7"X7'5"to l'O", . 


3.292 


14' 


Almshouse, .... 
Private building, . <. 


1 
1 








I 


Club house, .... 


1 


Winthrop, 


9'0" 


?, 864 


13- 

> 


Fire Department Station, 
Private building, . 
Bakery, .... 
Rendering works, . 


1 
1 
1 
1 


Chelsea, 


8'4"X9'2"to 1'10"X2'4", 


5.230 


13' 

• 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
off, 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off , 

Cameron Appliance Co., 

Shultz-Goodwin Co., 


1 

2 

1 

1 
1 


Everett, 


8'2"X8'10"to4'8"X5' 1", 


2.925 


7- 


Andrews- Wasgatt Co., . 
National Metallic Bed Co., . 
Linoide Co., .... 
Factory, .... 
New England Structural Co., 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


Maiden, . 


4'6"X4'10"tol'0", . 


5.8441 


33 i 


blow-off, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Private buildings, . 


1 

174 
114 


Melrose, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 10", . 


6.099 2 


37 1 


Factory, 

Railroad station, . 

Park Department bath house, 


1 
1 
1 



1 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



103 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded. 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 

— Concluded. 







0) 


i i 


Special Connections. 


Citt or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 






Character or Location of 








+3 

bD 


ublic 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


-9 ® 

SO 






h-3 


P4 




fc 








t 


Harvard dormitories, 


2 










Slaughterhouse, 


1 


Cambridge, . 


5' 2"X5' 9" to V 3", . 


7.209 


42- 


City Hospital, 

Street railway machine shop, 
Private buildings, . 
Tannery, .... 
Slaughterhouses (3), 
Car-house, .... 
Somerville Water Works blow- 


3 


Somerville, 


6' 5"X7' 2" to 10", . 


3.577 


11- 

• 


off, .... 
Street railway power-house, . 

Stable, 

Rendering works, . 
Railroad scale pit, . 
Armory building, . 




Medford, 


4' 8"X5' 1" to 10", . 


5.713 


24 < 

> 


Private buildings, . 

Stable, 

Police substation, . 
Tannery, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Gelatine factory, 




Winchester, . 


4' 6" to 1' 3", . 


9.470 


22- 


Stable, 

Railroad station, . . 
Felt works, . . . 
Town Hall, .... 




Stoneham, 


1' 3" to 10", 


0.010 


4^ 


- - 


_ 


Woburn, 


1' 10"X2' 4" to 1' 3", . 


0.933 


3 

f 


Glue factory, .... 
Private buildings, . 


151 


Arlington, 


1' 6" to 10", 


3.5201 


39 


Railroad station, . 
Car-house, .... 
Post office 


3 
1 


Belmont, 2 


- - 


- 


3 


- - 


- 


Wakefield, 2 . 


- - 


- 


1 


- - 


_ 


Revere, . 


4'0"to3'0", . 


0.136 


2 




- 




63.6913 


297 


517 



1 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

2 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 

3 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running parallel with 
the Metropolitan sewer. 



104 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 



City or Town. 



Boston: — 
Back Bay, . 



Brighton, . 
Dorchester, 

Hyde Park, 
Roxbury, . 

West Roxbury, 

Brookline, 
Dedham, 
Hull, & . 
Milton, . 
Newton, 

Quincy, . 

Waltham, 

Watertown, . 

Needham, B 
Wellesley, 7 



Size of Sewers. 



6' 6" to 3' 9", . 



5'9"X6'0"to 12", 



3'X4' to 2' 6"X2' 7", . 

10'7"Xll'7"to4'0"X4'l' 
6' 6"X7' to 4' 0", 

9' 3"X10' 2" to 12", . 

6' 6"X7' 0" to 8", 

4'X4' l"to 3' 9"X3' 10", 

60" pipe, 

ll'X12' to 8", . 

4' 2"X4' 9" to 1' 3", . 



11' 3"X12' 6" to 24" pipe, 
3' 6"X4' 0", 

4' 2"X4' 9" to 12", . 

2'0"X2'3",. 



a 



3 



1.5001 
6.0102 
2.8703 



4.527 
1.430 

7.600 

2.540* 

2.350 

0.750 

3.600 

2.911 



6.845 
0.001 

0.7506 

1.455 



45.139 



»c 



© 9 

OH H „ 

3.2 <3 



15 



15 



13 



18 



12 

7 

22 
6 

■;< 

5 



142 



Special Connections. 



Character or Location of 
Connection. 



Tufts Medical School, . 

Private house, 

Administration Building 
Boston Park Department, 

Simmons College buildings, 

Art Museum, . 

Abattoir, 

Chocolate works, . 

Machine shop, 

Paper mill, 

Private buildings, . 

Edison Electric Company Sta- 
tion, .... 

Mattapan Paper Mills, . 

Private buildings, . 

Parental School, 
Lutheran Evangelical Church 
Private buildings, . 
Private building, . 



Private buildings, . 
Private houses, 
Metropolitan Water 
blow-off, 



Works 



Factories, 

Stanley Motor Carriage Co., 

Knights of Pythias building, 



.5 a 
.2 

0> 05 



41 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

s Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

4 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 

5 Hull and Needham are not parts of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 
8 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

7 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few^feet into the town of Wellesley. 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the Metropolitan Sewerage districts appears in 
the following table : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



105 



North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 



Area 
(Square 
Miles). 



Estimated 

Total 
Population. 



90.50 



601,810 



Miles of 
Local Sewer 
connected. 



743.35 



Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 



542,575 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 

Population 

(Per Cent.). 



90.1 



Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 



Public. 



297 



Special. 



517 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 


110.76 


438,580 


627.61 


300,435 


68.5 


142 


41 


Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 


201.26 


1,040,390 


1,370.96 


843,010 


81.3 


439 


558 



Of the estimated gross population of 1,040,390 on December 31, 
1915, 843,010, representing 81.3 per cent., were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,370.96 miles of local sewers owned by the individual cities and 
towns of the districts. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan systems by 439 
public and 558 special connections. During the current year there 
has been an increase of 32.2 miles of local sewers connected with the 
Metropolitan systems, and 12 public and 15 special connections have 
been added. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Deer Island Outfall Extension. 
Work on the extension of the Deer Island outfall, which was 
authorized by Chapter 344 of the Acts of 1914, was started during 
the year. Considerable delay was experienced in obtaining the neces- 
sary permit from the United States Government. This was not 
received until June 29, 1915. Immediately a contract was made for 
the cast-iron pipe and specials which are to be used in the extension. 
The particulars of this contract are as follows : — 

Date of contract No. 130, August 27, 1915. 

Material, 84-inch cast-iron pipe and specials, 310 tons. 

Name of contractor, United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Company. 

At the present time these pipes are being constructed and are to 
be shipped early in the coming year. 



106 . METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Section 1A. — Deer Island Outfall Extension. — North Met- 
ropolitan System. 

In connection with the construction of the outfall extension it 
becomes necessary to construct a temporary outfall. This consists 
of a reinforced concrete masonry sewer extending from Station 1+15 
of Section 2 of the North Metropolitan System southeasterly across 
the government reservation on Deer Island to a controlling chamber 
at high-water line. From here the last 400 feet of this section will be 
constructed of 60-inch cast-iron pipe laid in a trench to a point 100 
feet beyond mean low-water line. It is intended that this temporary 
outfall line will be left in place and at some future time extended so 
as to make a duplicate outfall for the North Metropolitan System. 
This temporary outfall sewer is known as Section 1A. Some par- 
ticulars of this section and contract are as follows : — 

Date of contract No. 131, October 11, 1915. 

Length of section, 1,165 feet. 

Name of contractor, George M. Bryne. 

Average depth of cut (concrete sewer), 18 feet. 

Diameter of reinforced concrete sewer, 78 inches. 

Diameter of cast-iron pipe outfall, 60 inches. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Clarence A. Moore. 

At the present time the chamber near Station 4 is partially* con- 
structed and 173 feet of 78-inch reinforced concrete sewer has been 
constructed and 12 feet of 60-inch pipe has been placed. 

The connection of Section 1A to Section 2 has been completed by 
day labor. This work consists of the construction of a branch sewer 
and a controlling stop-plank manhole. Considerable water was en- 
countered most of which came from the 12-inch underdrain built 
under Section 2. The earth excavated consisted of sand and gravel. 

Section 19. — Malden River Siphon. — North Metropolitan 

System. 

Chapter 215 of the Acts of 1915 authorized the lowering of the 
Metropolitan sewerage siphon in Maiden River, known as Section 
19, North Metropolitan System, the cost of which is to be assessed 
upon the North Metropolitan Sewerage District. This relocation is 
necessary in order to comply with acts of Congress, chapters 253 
of 1912 and 142 of 1915, which appropriated $80,000 to be used in 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 107 

the deepening and straightening of the channel of Maiden River 
under the condition that the Commonwealth should relocate the 
Metropolitan sewerage siphon. 

In accordance with a written communication received by the 
Board from the Directors of the Port of Boston, dated August 31, 
1915, a siphon has been studied at such a depth as to allow for a 
20-foot channel. The work will consist of a brick siphon constructed 
by compressed air process and connecting sewers in trench on pile 
foundations together with a head house on the Everett side of the 
river. The necessary permits from the Directors of the Port of 
Boston and from the United States Government were not received 
until November 1, 1915. Immediately a contract for the construc- 
tion of this work was advertised. The particulars of this section and 
contract are as follows: — 

Date of contract No. 132, November 16, 1915. 

Length of 48-inch brick siphon and connecting sewers, 420 feet. 

Name of contractor, George M. Bryne. 

Depth of bottom of structure below high water, 43 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Clarence A. Moore. 

At time of writing the contractor's plant has been assembled and 
the shaft is partly constructed. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Section 43. — Relief Outfall. — South Metropolitan System. 

This 60-inch cast-iron pipe outfall was described in the report of 
1914. It was partially completed at the end of last year and has 
been fully completed and put into service during this year. This 
pipe is designed to be used for discharge in emergency cases only and 
owing to its short length of 1,400 feet, it has a discharging capacity 
of about the same as the combined capacities of the two outfall 
pipes ^completed in 1904. This additional pipe renders the High- 
level sewer outfalls competent for a long period. 

High-level Sewer Extension to Wellesley. 

Chapter 343 of the Acts of 1914 provided for the admission of 
Wellesley into the South Metropolitan Sewerage District and also 
for the construction of a trunk sewer connecting said town with the 
Neponset Valley sewer. This act was not accepted by the town of 



108 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Wellesley until March, 1915. Immediately after its acceptance 
studies and surveys were begun and the following line has been 
located. 

Starting at Station 22 + 39 of Section 26, Neponset Valley sewer 
in West Roxbury, the line extends in a westerly direction across the 
Charles River into Dedham and follows in this portion in a general 
way a line proposed by the State Board of Health as an alternate line 
crossing Bridge Street and Pine Street and again crossing the Charles 
River. It then continues in Dedham through private lands till it 
again approaches the said river, thence it extends along its southern 
bank crossing Greendale Avenue and Dedham Avenue. Near the 
latter it again crosses the Charles River into the town of Needham 
and extends along the northerly side of the river and in a general 
way parallel to said river through private lands crossing Chestnut 
Street, South Street and the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad about 500 feet west of Charles River Station, continuing 
in private lands and crossing Central Avenue and Charles River 
Street and extending to a point in private land in the town of 
Wellesley about 10 feet north of the Needham- Wellesley town 
line. 

This route differs from that studied by the State Board of Health 
in a preliminary way chiefly in the lower portion near West Rox- 
bury where it follows in a general way the alternate line proposed by 
said Board. This change was made to avoid crossing the water 
fields of the Brookline Water Works, also to furnish sewerage outlet 
for a rapidly growing section in Dedham near Bridge Street and also 
to connect at a point where the Metropolitan sewer increases in 
size. 

During the year that part of the line extending from Chestnut 
Street, Needham, to the Wellesley-Needham town line has been 
placed under contract and divided into four sections. These con- 
tracts are described in the order of their dates. 

Section 106. — Wellesley Extension. — South Metropolitan 

System. 

This section begins at a point on the northerly side of the Charles 
River in land of Hugh D. Scott and extends northerly through said 
land, land of F. Murray Forbes, land formerly belonging to Arthur 
W. Pope, crossing Charles River Street and through other land, of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 109 

Arthur W. Pope and land of Isabella P. Shaw to a point in Wellesley 
about 10 feet north of the Wellesley-Needham town line. 

Some particulars of this section and contract are as follows : — 

Date of contract No. 123, July 29, 1915. 

Name of contractor, Hugh Nawn Contracting Company. 

Length of section, 4,355 feet. 

Average depth of cut, 13 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 24 inches x 27 inches. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Ralph W. Loud. 

Considerable difficulty was experienced in the construction of this 
section from Station 19 + 50 to Station 37 + 0. An unusually fine 
gray sand was encountered about 6 feet below the surface which 
rendered the progress exceedingly slow and expensive. No large 
amount of water was found and at time of writing there yet remains 
to be constructed 1,095 feet. No ledge was encountered. 

Section 105. — Wellesley Extension. — South Metropolitan 

System. 

This section starts at a point in Central Avenue about 100 feet 
west of its junction with Fisher Street and extends northwesterly 
through land of the Walker-Gordon Laboratory Company and land 
of C. H. W. Foster to a point in the land of Hugh D. Scott men- 
tioned as the beginning of Section 106. 

Some particulars of this section and contract are as follows : — 

Date of contract No. 124, July 29, 1915. 

Name of contractor, Hugh Nawn Contracting Company. 

Length of section, 4,425 feet. 

Average depth of cut, 9 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 24 inches x 27 inches. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Ralph W. Loud. 

No difficulty was encountered in the construction of this section. 
A small amount only of ground water was encountered. The sec- 
tion, except minor surface repairs, was completed on December 31, 
1915. Ledge was encountered near Station 0, Station 8 + 50 and 
Station 42. 



110 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Section 104. — Wellesley Extension. — South Metropolitan 

System. 

This section begins at a point in private land of Mrs. Anne B. 
Richardson and extends westerly through said land, then through 
land of the Needham Tire Company partly in tunnel and crosses 
South Street in tunnel. From here it extends in open cut through 
private lands belonging to the Quinobequin Canoe Association, Walker- 
Gordon Laboratory Company, Joseph W. Battelle, Martha H. Bur- 
rage, Clifford M. Locke and in tunnel through lands of Heirs of John 
Defren and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. It 
then extends in open cut through other land of the Walker-Gordon 
Laboratory Company and land of Charles H. Harmon to a point in 
Central Avenue described as the commencement of Section 105. 

Some particulars of this section and contract are as follows : — 

Date of contract No. 133, December- 22, 1915. 

Name of contractor, Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company. 

Total length of section, 4,300 feet. 

Length in tunnel, 930 feet. 

Average depth of tunnel, 26 feet. < 

Average depth of open cut, 13 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer in tunnel, 27 inches x 36 inches. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer in trench, 24 inches x 27 inches. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, A. F. F. Haskell. 

Work on this section has not been started. 

Section 103. — Wellesley Extension. — South Metropolitan 

System. 

This section starts at a point in Chestnut Street about 40 feet 
north of the bridge across Charles River and extends in a westerly 
direction through private lands of I. Tucker Burr, Jr., John Wells 
Farley, Mrs. Anne Williams, Mrs. Leslie B. Cutler and Mrs. Anne 
B. Richardson to a point described as the beginning of Section 104. 

Some particulars of this section and contract are as follows : — 

Date of contract No. 134, December 22, 1915. 

Name of contractor, Bruno & Petitti. 

Length of section, 5,916 feet. 

Average depth of cut, 7 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 24 inches x 27 inches. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, A. F. F. Haskell. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. Ill 

Work on this section has not yet been started. 

These four sections represent about one-half of the total line. 
Studies for the remainder are in progress and all will be under con- 
tract during the coming year. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Scope of Work and Foece Employed. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of 7 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house and 
108.83 miles of Metropolitan sewers, receiving the discharge from 
1370.96 miles of town and city sewers at 439 points, together with 
the care and study of inverted siphons under streams and in the 
harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force includes 167 men, of whom 101 
are employed on the North System and 66 on the South System. 
These are subdivided as follows: engineers and other employees at 
the pumping stations, North Metropolitan System, 58; and on 
maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds, 43 men, in- 
cluding foremen; South Metropolitan System, 34 engineers and 
other employees within the pumping stations; and 32 men, includ- 
ing foremen, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and 
grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation 
of the pumping stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning 
and inspecting sewers and siphons, caring for tide gates, regulators 
and overflows, measuring flow in sewers, inspection of connections 
with the Metropolitan sewers, care of pumping stations and other 
buildings and grounds, and the maintenance of the ferry at Shirley 
Gut for transporting employees and supplies in connection with the 
operation of the Deer Island pumping station. 

In addition to these regular duties other work has been done by 
this department as follows : — 

New Mystic Sewer. 
The New Mystic sewer, authorized by Chapter 461 of the Acts of 
1912, was put into operation on January 7, 1915. This relieves the 
congested condition of the Metropolitan sewers through the town of 
Winchester. 



112 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Deer Island Pumping Station. 

During the year, at this station, a new 8-inch steam main has been 
installed to connect the boilers with the new steam main erected in 
1910. This replaces the original steam main which was constructed 
in 1894. 

Extensive repairs have been made to pump No. 2 at this station 
during the year. These consist of adjusting the impeller wheel and 
refitting it to the 10-inch shaft, the renewal of the bronze sleeve 
bushing, the cutting of the shaft and the introduction of a sleeve 
coupling. This pump is now in good condition. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 

East Boston Pumping Station. 

During the year the roofs over the old engine house and machine 
shop and the new coal house have had extensive repairs. The in- 
clination of the roofs has been increased and the tiling on the same 
has been relaid in Portland cement mortar with expansion joints 
filled with elastic cement. 

The screen-house, mentioned in last year's report as under con- 
struction, was completed on February 28, 1915, excepting the floor. 
This consists of tile and cast-iron plates and was constructed by the 
maintenance employees. 

The new screening machinery has been completed during the year 
and is in operation. The system of forced ventilation of the sewers 
and underground chambers for removal of dangerous gases has 
proved efficient and satisfactory. 

An addition was made to the land holding at this station by the 
acquisition in fee of 7,885 square feet of land in front of the station 
from the East Boston Company. A lease for a strip of land about 
10 feet in width on the westerly side of the pumping station lot has 
been arranged for with the Boston & Albany Railroad Company. 
The newly acquired land in front of the station has been loamed and 
granolithic sidewalks and curbing have been placed. Macadam sur- 
facing has been placed in the area back of the screen-house and on a 
15-foot way in front of the pumping station. 

Machinery was added to the machine shop during the year in the 
shape of a large upright drill and a shaping machine. A wood 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 113 

planer has also been placed in the carpenter and pattern shop. 
Labor for all the above changes and repairs has been furnished by 
the maintenance employees. 

Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station the old sheet-iron by-pass which extended between 
the boiler room and the chimney had become so badly corroded that 
it was necessary to remove it. This was replaced by a brick by-pass. 
In connection with this work changes were made whereby the 
dynamo room was materially enlarged and a new switch board has 
been installed. 

During the year repairs have been made to the pumps at this 
station. Pump No. 2 shaft has been refitted with a new bronze 
sleeve bushing. Repairs on pump No. 3 consisted of refitting the 
10-inch shaft to the impeller wheel and adjusting the latter, cutting 
of the shaft and the renewal of the bronze sleeve bushing and the 
introduction of a sleeve coupling. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 

Cleaning of Old Mystic Valley Sewer. 

That part of the old Mystic Valley sewer which was constructed 
by the city of Boston in 1878 which lies north of Cross Street, Win- 
chester, has never been a part of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 
At the time of the creation of the Metropolitan Water Board in 1895 
this part of the old Mystic Valley sewer became the property of 
said Board. During the year it has been necessary to expend con- 
siderable labor on this line for repairs and cleaning. Its condition 
has been very much improved. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 

Ward Street Pumping Station. 

During the year the weir chamber and 36-inch cast-iron pipe which 
were used in the testing of the plant have been remodelled into a 
fresh water reservoir which contains enough for about 24 hours' 
supply in the station. Necessary piping connections have been 
made whereby this water can be used in case of accident to the street 
water-service pipes. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 



114 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Nut Island Screen-house. 

At this station a new boiler blow-off pipe has been laid from the 
station to the beach at the north extremity of Nut Island. 
This work was done by maintenance employees. 

Section 70. — High-level Sewer. 

At the time of the construction of Section 70 a 48-inch cast-iron 
pipe was constructed across the Metropolitan sewer for the purpose of 
temporarily maintaining the service of the existing city of Boston 
sewer in Washington Street, West Roxbury. At the completion of 
the Metropolitan sewer this city sewer was made tributary to it. 
This 48-inch pipe, however, was not at the time removed. During 
the present year this has been removed and the resulting necessary 
changes have been made in the Metropolitan sewer at this point. 

This work was done by maintenance employees. 

The 24-inch brick siphon mentioned in last year's report as being 
constructed by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for the 
city of Boston underneath the Metropolitan sewer at the same locality, 
was turned over to the custody of the city of Boston on January 8, 1915. 
Full payment for this construction has been received from the city of 
Boston. 

Gasolene in Public Sewers. 

In compliance with the directions of the Board to make a study of 
the subject of gasolene in the Metropolitan sewers the following has 
been accomplished. 

An inspector from this department has visited every municipality 
in the district. Lists of places where gasolene and similar oils are 
used have been obtained from the local authorities who, by law, are 
required to issue permits for the use and storage of these oils. 

In all 1,451 places have been visited in accordance with lists 
furnished him by these local authorities. Of these 277 were found 
to be connected with public sewers. Separators which would con- 
form to the requirements of this Board were found in 25 places only. 
At time of writing 132 places have been changed to comply with the 
requirements, leaving 97 others to be changed. In general the 
owners have made these changes without serious opposition. In one 
or two cases only has it been found necessary to issue peremptory 
orders that changes should be made. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



115 



In the city of Boston we find appliances in use which were installed 
for the purpose of excluding sand from the public sewers. Many of 
these with slight changes can be made into suitable gasolene excluders. 
Notices have been sent to all of the municipalities that all establish- 
ments of this kind to be constructed in the future must be supplied 
with excluding devices. 

The accompanying tables show the situation as it exists. With- 
out doubt there are other places where these oils are used which our 
inspector has not yet discovered as in some of the municipalities the 
records are imperfect. 

'Table showing Number of Places where Gasolene is used and Progress 
of Work of installing Separators to January 1, 1916. 

North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 





T3-d 
© a> 

35 3 


CQ O 


i i 


a © 

.a > 

S3 






City or Town. 


CO o> 

8.2 

K-c W 


"2£ 

S3-S 


of Places < 
having ac 
jparators. 


er of Place 
h Changes 
made. 


of Places 
supplied 
tors. 


Remarks. 




<S © 


© © 5s 


© ,J» 


>- ii * 

© 2 H 






iJ3 a> 


•° 2 1 
a fl > 

H O © 


^^ © 


-o.2 fl 


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§1 


S'SS 


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H'g © 


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3 £ 


3 8aa 


3 PI 05 


3 £.D 


3^3} 






B 


& 


B 


fc 


£ 




Arlington, 




2 


2 


- 


- 


2 




Belmont, 




- 


- 


* - 


- 


- 


No places connected with sewer. 


Boston: — 
















Charlestown District, 




16 


7 


- 


5 


2 




East Boston District, 




7 


7 


- 


2 


5 




Cambridge, . 








283 


41 


- 


24 


17 




Chelsea, 








24 


9 


- 


5 


4 




Everett, 








24 


12 


- 


12 






Lexington, . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


No public sewers yet connected 
with Metropolitan Sewer. 


Maiden, 








61 


18 


- 


14 


4 




Medford, 








44 


10 


- 


6 


4 




Melrose, 








21 


4 


- 


2 


2 




Revere, 








7 


5 


- 


4 


1 




Somerville, . 








133 


27 


8 


6 


13 




Stoneham, . 








6 


2 


- 


1 


1 




Wakefield, . 








4 


4 


- 


2 


2 




Winchester, 








40 


6 


- 


2 


4 




Winthrop, 








5 


3 


- 


2 


1 




Woburn, 








6 


2 


- 


- 


2 




Totals, . 


683 


159 


8 


87 


64 





116 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table showing Number of Places where Gasolene is used and Progress 
of Work of installing Separators to January 1, 1916. 

South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 



City or Town. 



S3 B 

>.s 

8 « 

oo 

S2 
-2 » 
6-s 





pMPL, 

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oa £ 

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Remarks. 



Boston: — 
Hyde Park District, 
West Roxbury District, 
Back Bay District, 
Brighton District, 
Dorchester District, 

Brookline, 

Dedham, 

Milton, 

Newton, 

Quincy, 

Waltham, 

Watertown, 

Wellesley, 

Totals, 



489 

91 
2 

106 
10 
50 
15 



41 

27 
2 

23 
9 

11 



13 

18 

2 



23 



Most of these have sand traps 
only. 



Conditions in this town are 
very good. 



No garages connected with 

public sewers. 
Not yet reported on. 



Not allowed to connect with 
public sewers. 



No public sewers yet connected 
with Metropolitan Sewer. 



768 



118 



17 



45 



33 



Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in Win- 
chester, WOBURN AND STONEHAM. 

Five men and a foreman have been employed during a part of the 
year in flushing and cleaning the Metropolitan sewers through the 
tannery districts of Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

All the tanneries and glue works of the district now have settling 
tanks of substantial size. This method of treatment has very 
greatly reduced the amount of sludge material entering the Metro- 
politan sewers. 

The following table gives details of settling tanks introduced to 
date, showing the operations of same with the amount of sludge 
collected and removed : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



117 



Table of Semi-fluid Sludge removed from Settling Basins at the Tanneries, Gela- 
tine and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham, Year ending 
December 81, 1915. 



Location of Basin. 



Basin put in 
Operation. 



Inside 
Measure- 
ment 
of Basin 
(Feet). 



© c3 

o -P 
© fl 

as 



M a£ 

>> u u 
"j3 ® 

© ym 

«3 & 
£. qg rg pH 

<! 



t3 m^; 
"3-2,3 

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a ^ 

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m ©•- 

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3 © © 

Eh 



Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 1, 
Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 2, 
Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 3, 
S. C. Parker & Son 



American Hide and Leather Company 

Factory D. 
B. F. Kimball & Co., 



E. Cummings Leather Company, 

W. P. Fox & Sons, 

Thayer & Foss, 1 

Bay State Leather Company, 2 . 

Van Tassell Leather Company, 

American Glue Company, 

J. O. Whitten Company, 3 . 



Total, 



Jan. 15, 1910 

May 9, 1910 

Oct. 19, 1911 

Aug. 1, 1910 

Nov. 15, 1910 

Dec. 10, 1910 

Nov. 1, 1910 

July 12, 1910 

Sept. 15, 1910 

Jan. 9, 1911 
May 1, 1911 j 

Oct. 1, 1910 

1902 / 



47.0 X 23.0 
47.0 X 23.0 
51.0 X 25.0 
48.3 X 23.0 

48.0 X 23.1 
47.2 X 23.0 
45.9 X 22.6 
47.8 X 22.6 

48.1 X 23.1 

46.8 X 22.9 

10.2 X 14.5 
43.8 X 19.5 

47.1 X 23.0 

35.5 X 24.7 

67.2 X 12.0 



5 
9 

1 

5 l A 
1 

1 

2H 

7 



136.00 
136.00 
160.40 

69.88 
139.54 
106.84 

97.60 
135.20 

61.17 
134.32 
102.00 

136.36 

58.74 



680.00 

1,224.00 

882.20 

69.88 
627.93 
372.94 
341.60 
743.60 

61.17 
335.80 
102.00 

340.90 

411.18 
51.00 



6,244.20 



1 Successors to T. F. Boyle & Co. 

2 Factory burned May 27, 1915, and abandoned. 

3 Successors to Winchester Manufacturing Company. 



118 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



PUMPING STATIONS. 

Capacity and Results. 

The pumping stations have been operated throughout the entire 
year on the increased rate of wages which was in operation only 
seven months of the preceding year. Notwithstanding this increase 
the expense per million foot-gallons in the pumping stations of the 
north line is substantially below that of last year. 

On the south line the expense is slightly in excess of last year. 

During the year the pumping plants at Deer Island, East Boston 
and Charlestown have been extensively repaired and their efficiency 
increased. 

Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Six Principal Metropolitan 
Pumping Stations and the Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station 
during the Year, as compared with the Corresponding Volumes for the Previous 
Year. 



PUMPING STATION. 



Average Daily Pumpage. 



Jan. 1, 1914, to 
Dec. 31, 1914. 



Deer Island, . . .... 

East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Ale wife Brook 

Quincy, 

Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 

Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage lifting sta- 
tion. 



Gallons. 
58,700,000 

56,700,000 

32,600,000 

3,506,000 

3,993,000 

26,718,000 

84,500 



Jan. 1, 1915, to 
Dec. 31, 1915. 



Gallons. 
60,392,000 

58,392,000 

33,500,000 

3,371,000 

3,865,000 

26,933,000 

177,700 



Increase during the 
Year. 



Gallons. 
1,692,000 

1,692,000 

900,000 

135,000 1 

128,0001 

215,000 

93,200 



Per Cent. 
2.9 

3.0 

2.7 

3.8i 

3.2i 

0.8 

110.3 



1 Decrease. 



North Metropolitan System. 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 
At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 



122 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average duty for the year: 54,725,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 60,392,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 3 screenmen, 

1 relief screenman and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River and Sterling Elmora, costing from $3.77 to $4.22 per gross 

ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1915 

January, . 




2,081,500,000 


67,100,000 


32,000,000 


128,900,000 


11.43 


50,600,000 


February, 






2,025,200,000 


72,300,000 


51,100,000 


117,100,000 


11.24 


50,600,000 


March, 






1,627,200,000 


52,500,000 


44,600,000 


62,200,000 


11.14 


49,300,000 


April, 






1,633,200,000- 


54,400,000 


46,500,000 


73,200,000 


10.68 


53,800,000 


May, 






1,772,700,000 


57,200,000 


47,300,000 


80,000,000 


11.07 


64,000,000 


June, 






1,463,400,000 


48,800,000 


38,800,000 


60,100,000 


10.83 


58,700,000 


July, 






2,393,200,000 


77,200,000 


50,400,000 


137,400,000 


10.92 


51,200,000 


August, . 






2,403,200,000 


77,500,000 


50,400,000 


126,100,000 


10.34 


54,700,000 


September, 






1,497,100,000 


49,900,000 


40,200,000 


59,000,000 


10.64 


54,100,000 


October, . 






1,594,500,000 


51,400,000 


43,600,000 


77,700,000 


10.76 


58,700,000 


November, 






1,568,400,000 


52,300,000 


41,400,000 


79,500,000 


10.85 


54,600,000 


December, 






1,987,000,000 


64,100,000 


45,300,000 


107,600,000 


11.36 


56,400,000 


Total, 


22,046,600,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 






- 


60,392,000 


44,300,000 


92,400,000 


10.94 


54,725,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station. 

Volume (22,046.6 Million Gallons) X Lift (10.94 Feet) = 241,189.8 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, ; 



$16,816 92 

9,901 89 

257 08 

56 64 

1,461 80 

117 44 

1,874 81 



). 06972 
.04105 
.00107 
.00023 
.00606 
.00049 
.00777 




No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 



East Boston Pumping Station. 
At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 74,725,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 58,392,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 2 relief engineers, 3 firemen, 1 relief fireman, 4 

oilers, 3 screenmen, 1 relief screenman, 3 helpers and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River and Sterling Elmora, costing from $3.77 to $4.21 per gross 

ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1915 

January, . 




2,019,500,000 


65,100,000 


30,000,000 


126,900,000 


15.33 


70,400,000 


February, 






1,969,200,000 


70,300,000 


49,100,000 


115,100,000 


15.60 


75,100,000 


March, 






1,565,200,000 


50,500,000 


42,600,000 


60,200,000 


14.97 


65,900,000 


April, 






1,573,200,000 


52,400,000 


44,500,000 


71,200,000 


15.06 


78,600,000 


May, 






1,710,700,000 


55,200,000 


45,300,000 


78,000,000 


14.99 


81,400,000 


June, 






1,403,400,000 


46,800,000 


36,800,000 


58,100,000 


14.69 


71,500,000 


July, 






2,331,200,000 


75,200,000 


48,400,000 


135,400,000 


15.06 


81,300,000 


August, . 






2,341,200,000 


75,500,000 


48,400,000 


124,100,000 


14.97 


86,000,000 


September, 






1,437,100,000 


47,900,000 


38,200,000 


57,000,000 


14.86 


72,900,000 


October, . 






1,532,500,000 


49,400,000 


41,600,000 


75,700,000 


14.64 


71,600,000 


November, 






1,508,400,000 


50,300,000 


39,400,000 


77,500,000 


14.79 


71,700,000 


December, 






1,925,000,000 


62,100,000 


43,300,000 


105,600,000 


15.08 


70,300,000 


Total, 


21,316,600,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


58,392,000 


42,300,000 


90,400,000 


15.00 


74,725,000 



124 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (21,316.6 Million Gallons) X Lift (15.00 Feet) = 319,749.0 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



519,798 45 

11,083 90 

359 66 

97 02 

1,843 20 

51 93 

1,001 89 



$34,236 05 
$1,368 75 



$0. 06192 
.03466 
.00112 
.00030 
,00576 
.00016 
.00313 



1.10705 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impeller wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 
feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines of 
the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 52,958,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 33,500,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen 

and 1 relief screenman. 
Coal used: New River and Sterling Elmora, costing from $4.03 to $4.53 per gross 

ton. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



125 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

' Coal). 


1915 

January, . 




1,159,000,000 


37,400,000 


18,600,000 


69,100,000 


9.63 


54,200,000 


February, 






1,149,300,000 


41,000,000 


30,500,000 


60,400,000 


8.57 


52,500,000 


March, 






882,700,000 


28,800,000 


22,100,000 


35,400,000 


8.40 


49,800,000 


April, 






853,400,000 


28,400,000 


21,100,000 


45,500,000 


8.14 


46,600,000 


May, 






969,700,000 


31,300,000 


22,400,000 


44,600,000 


8.15 


50,400,000 


June, 






902,100,000 


30,100,000 


24,400,000 


40,400,000 


8.41 


55,300,000 


July, 






1,267,000,000 


40,900,000 


25,900,000 


69,300,000 


8.30 


56,200,000 


August, . 






1,236,900,000 


39,900,000 


24,900,000 


61,400,000 


8.49 


59,300,000 


September, 






917,200,000 


30,600,000 


21,800,000 


41,200,000 


9.07 


64,700,000 


October, . 






897,900,000 


29,000,000 


23,100,000 


45,500,000 


8.36 


45,500,000 


November, 






909,000,000 


30,300,000 


22,700,000 


50,600,000 


8.43 


50,400,000 


December, 






1,064,500,000 


34,300,000 


23,300,000 


59,600,000 


8.45 


50,600,000 


Total, 


12,208,700,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


33,500,000 


23,400,000 


51,917,000 


8.53 


52,958,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (12,208.7 Million Gallons) X Lift (8.53 Feet) = 104,140.2 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, .... 



$12,589 80 

4,297 81 

93 36 

71 17 

522 00 

52 90 

458 74 



$18,085 78 
$3,138 08 



$0.12089 
.04127 
.00090 
.00068 
.00501 
.00051 
.00441 



$0.17367 



126 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Alewife Brook Pumping Station. 

The plant at this station consists of two 9-inch Andrews com- 
mercial centrifugal pumps, direct connected by horizontal shafts to 
compound marine engines, together with a pump and engine added 
later. The latter consists of a specially designed engine of the ver- 
tical cross-compound type, having between the cylinders a centrif- 
ugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 

Contract capacity of the two original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13- 
foot lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump : 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 17,333,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,371,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: New River, costing from $4.89 to $5.16 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1915 

January, . 




123,539,000 


3,985,000 


2,036,000 


8,406,000 


12.96 


17,100,000 


February, 






140,947,000 


5,034,000 


3,380,000 


7,934,000 


12.97 


19,100,000 


March, 






102,312,000 


3,300,000 


2,550,000 


4,493,000 


13.09 


18,400,000 


April, 






83,484,000 


2,783,000 


2,503,000 


3,862,000 


13.08 . 


16,000,000 


May, 






85,094,000 


2,745,000 


2,078,000 


3,968,000 


13.06 


17,000,000 


June, 






69,966,000 


2,332,000 


2,036,000 


3,574,000 


13.04 


16,200,000 


July, 






146,803,000 


4,736,000 


2,928,000 


7,875,000 


12.88 


22,500,000 


August, . 






148,616,000 


4,794,000 


3,129,000 


7,934,000 


12.68 


21,500,000 


September, 






76,584,000 


2,553,000 


2,162,000 


3,229,000 


12.89 


14,700,000 


October, . 






74,890,000 


2,416,000 


1,994,000 


3,814,000 


12.96 


14,300,000 


November, 






74,272,000 


2,476,000 


2,078,000 


4,143,000 


13.01 


14,900,000 


December, 






102,355,000 


3,302,000 


2,246,000 


5,688,000 


12.97 


16,300,000 


Total, 


1,228,862,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,371,000 


2,427,000 


5,410,000 


12.97 


17,333,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



127 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,228.862 Million Gallons) X Lift (12.97 Feet) = 15,938.34 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



56,388 19 

1,889 45 

127 46 

93 74 

191 40 

34 72 

180 87 



5,885 83 
5,170 15 



$0.40081 
.11729 
.00800 
.00588 
.01201 
.00218 
.01135 



1.55752 



South Metropolitan System. 

Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, 
of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the 
plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 82,029,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day : 26,933,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 5 oilers, 4 assistant 

engineers, 1 machinist and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: Sterling Elmora and New River, costing from $4.72 to $5.01 per gross 

ton. 
Material intercepted at screens during the year, 1,300.4 cubic yards. 



128 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pubi Doc. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1915 

January, . 




983,508,000 


31,791,000 


19,778,000 


58,290,000 


41.69 


89,590,000 


February, 






945,322,000 


33,762,000 


25,868,000 


47,847,000 


42.30 


83,700,000 


March, 






797,149,000 


25,714,000 


21,262,000 


33,254,000 


42.00 


78,582,000 


April, 






774,216,000 


25,807,000 


22,055,000 


32,092,000 


41.89 


76,000,000 


May, 






706.008.0C0 


22,774,000 


18,420,000 


29,680,000 


41.42 


69,455,000 


June, 






615,943,000 


20,531,000 


17,546,000 


27,145,000 


41.10 


74,879,000 


July, 






988,594,000 


31,890,000 


22,447,000 


59,983,000 


41.75 


93,752,000 


August, . 






1,011,250,000 


32,622,000 


22,948,000 


45,003,000 


42.05 


94,886,000 


September, 






786,581.000 


26,219,000 


21,395,000 


30,125,000 


41.39 ' 


86,222,000 


October, . 






732,954,000 


23,644,000 


19,314,000 


34,895,000 


41.35 


78,843,000 


November, 






642,621,000 


21,421,000 


18,397,000 


30,888,000 


41.67 


68,271,000 


December, 






837,686,000 


27,022,000 


18,712,000 


44,295,000, 


41.78 


90,168,000 


Total, 


9,821,832,000 


. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


26,933,000 


20,679,000 


39,458,000 


41.70 


82,029,000 



Records from plunger displacement. 



Average Cost per Million Foot -gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street Station. 

Volume (9,821.8 Million Gallons) X Lift (41.7 Feet) = 409,569.06 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 


$17,417 22 


$0.04253 


Coal, 


















10,711 40 


0.02615 


Oil, . 


















189 56 


0.00046 


Waste, 


















23 25 


0.00006 


Water, 


















1,470 00 


0.00359 


Packing, . 


















98 59 


0.00024 


Miscellaneous suppl 


es and renewals, 
















3,705 26 


0.00905 


Totals, 


$33,615 28 


$0.08208 


Labor at screens, 


















$4,353 47 


- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



129 



Quincy Pumping Station. 

At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Deane, 3,000,000 gallons; Deane, 5,000,000 
gallons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 

Average duty for the year: 30,280,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,865,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: New River, costing from $4.51 to $4.99 per gross ton. 

Materials intercepted at screen during the year, 235 cubic yards. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1915 

January, . 




163,009,000 


5,258,000 


3,082,000 


7,469,000 


23.71 


31,000,000 


February, 






174,018,000 


6,215,000 


5,277,000 


7,835,000 


26.18 


31,800,000 


March, 






140,411,000 


4,529,000 


3,739,000 


5,722,000 


21.88 


30,300,000 


April, 






111,527,000 


3,718,000 


2,584,000 


4,174,000 


20.94 


31,100,000 


May, 






105,420,000 


3,401,000 


2,907,000 


3,843,000 


21.01 


33,500,000 


June, 






87,725,000 


2,924,000 


2,571,000 


3,189,000 


21.07 


30,100,000 


July, 






118,465,000 


3,821,000 


3,304,000 


4,940,000 


21.25 


32,400,000 


August, . 






124,317,000 


4,010,000 


3,273,000 


4,613,000 


20.87 


32,200,000 


September, 






106,318,000 


3,544,000 


2,842,000 


5,150,000 


20.65 


30,600,000 


October, . 






90,728,000 


2,927,000 


2,498,000 


3,190,000 


20.99 


27,800,000 


November, 






82,173,000 


2,739,000 


2,111,000 


2,975,000 


20.95 


25,800,000 


December, 






102,114,000 


3,294,000 


2,541,000 


4,111,000 


20.85 


26,800,000 


Total, 


1,406,225,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,865,000 


3,061,000 


4,768,000 


21.70 


30,280,000 



130 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,406.2 Million Gallons) X Lift (21.7 Feet) = 30,514.54 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, . 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screen, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



$6,628 37 

1,854 65 

31 08 

26 38 

203 56 

45 96 

418 26 



$9,208 26 
$1,782 91 



1.21722 
.06077 
.00102 
.00086 
.00667 
.00151 
.01376 



$0.30181 



Nut Island Screen-house. 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two 
vertical Deane boilers, 80 horse-power* each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat and light for the house, burn materials intercepted at the 
screens, and furnish power for the Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage 
lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens, 52,300,000 gallons. 

Total materials intercepted at screens, 1,129.3 cubic yards. 

Materials intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharged, 1.59 cubic feet. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: Sterling Elmora and New River, costing from $4.14 to $4.75 per gross 
ton. 

Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station. 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal pumps 
with vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct-current motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from 
the Nut Island screen-house and as used at present it does not 
materially increase the amount of coal used at the latter station. 
The effluent is largely ground water. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: about 1,500,000 gallons each, with 20-foot lift. 
Average daily amount pumped, 177,700 gallons. 
Average lift, 16.1 feet. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



131 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the Year. 





Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 






g 

a 

3 
Ph 
-d 

S3 . 

e3 £3 
'an O 
m-43 

Q 


M 
C 

'ft 

a 

S3 

Ph 

a 
o 

01 G 

o o 

+, 03 

C3«2 


&0 

a 
ft 

* . 
S a 

M 2 

£'■£ 


a 
£ 

3 
Ph 

8.2 
«-S 

< 


a 
"ft 

a 

3 
Pi 

■+3 

0> 

a> . 

DQ.S 

T3 S3 
t-i ■** 


s3 
-t-> 

GO. 

bO 
g 

ft 

a 

3 

Ph 
>> . 

2 a 
S ° 
'3 '-3 

or 


■ 

© 

U 

O 

OQ 

-d 
►-I £ 

GO 

3 

4J O 

3.G 


a 
o 
H 

m 
m 
O 

t-, 



u 

© 
ft 

"C 
Ph 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


317 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$3 77 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


1,115 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 82 


New England Coal & Coke Com- 


707 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 17 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


746 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 22 


pany. 
Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


395 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 77 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


407 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 89 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


331 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 90 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


369 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 03 


New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


355 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 17 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


736 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 21 


pany. 
Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


285 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 03 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


233 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 04 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


159 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 24 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


250 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 49 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


290 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 53 


Locke Coal Company, 


- ■ 


- 


- 


65 


- 


- 


- 


4 89 


Locke Coal Company, 




- 


- 


12 


- 


- 


- 


5 07 


Locke Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


49 


- 


- 


- 


5 16 


Locke Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


246 


- 


- 


- 


5 15 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


- 


- 


- 


192 


- 


- 


4 72 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


- 


- 


- 


327 


- 


- 


4 73 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


' - 


- 


- 


- 


115 


- 


- 


4 77 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


- 


- 


- 


36 


- 


- 


4 81 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


- 


- 


- 


129 


- 


- 


4 82 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


- 


- 


- 


222 


- 


- 


4 87 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


- 


- 


- 


468 




- 


4 88 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


- 


- 


4 93 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28 


- 


- 


4 95 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


375 


- 


- 


4 96 


Staples Coal Company, 


. 


- 


- 


- 


126 


- 


- 


4 99 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


176 


- 


- 


5 01 



1 Includes adjustments for quality. 



132 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the Year 

— Concluded. 





Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 






wo 


w> 


bD 


■ 


M 


, 


1 






s 


a 


q 


a 


a 


c3 


a 






a 


a 


a 


a 


'a 


02 




© 







a 

3 


a 

3 


a 

3 


3 
Ph 


a 


feO 




02 


H 




Ph 


Ph 


PU 


^ • 


Pm 


a 




0Q 






o 




8.2 


+3 
© 


a 


T3 






,5 c 


1+3 *H* 


S « 


Mta 


J3 « 


Ph 






• 


03 O 


5 ° 

PQ-43 


m O 
©'.£! 

o3 ** 


la 


5a .2 


2 fl 




a 
© 




a>GC! 

Q 




JSgQ 
O 


3' 


e3 02 


•3-43 


3^5 


(4 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


55 


- 


$4 51 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


153 


- 


4 69 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


73 


- 


4 73 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


65 


- 


4 76 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


42 


- • 


4 99 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


222 


4 14 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


175 


4 18 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


228 


4 75 


Total gross tons, 


2,885 


2,593 


1,217 


372 


2,224 


388 


625 


- 


Average price per gross ton, . 


$4 00 


$4 02 


$4 27 


$5 08 


$4 89 


$4 72 


U 37 


- 



1 Includes adjustments for quality. 



Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls. 

The Deer Island outfall has been in continuous operation since 
May, 1895. It is in good condition. 

The 60-inch outfalls of the South Metropolitan System, completed 
in October, 1904, were examined by a diver during the year and 
were found to be in good condition and free from deposit. 

During the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan 
outfall at Deer Island has been 60,392,000 gallons of sewage per 24 
hours, with a maximum rate of 151,600,000 gallons during the stormy 
period in August, 1915. The amount of sewage discharged in the 
North Metropolitan District averaged 111 gallons per day for each 
person, taking the estimated population of the district contributing 
sewage. If the sewers in this district were restricted to the admis- 
sion of sewage proper only, this per capita amount would be con- 
siderably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 52,300,000 gallons 
of sewage has passed daily through the screens at the Nut Island 



No. 57.] ■ AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 133 

screen-house, and has been discharged from the outfalls into the 
outer harbor. The maximum rate of discharge per day, which 
occurred during a heavy storm on July 1, 1915, was 155,000,000 
gallons. The discharge of sewage through these outfalls represents 
the amount of sewage contributed in the South Metropolitan System, 
which was at the rate of 174 gallons per day per person of the esti- 
mated number contributing sewage in the district. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in 
the South Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan 
District, because, owing to the large size of the High-level sewer, 
more storm water is at present admitted to the sewers. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating ma- 
terials, has during the year amounted to 2,193.4 cubic yards. This 
is equivalent to 2.691 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage 
pumped at Deer Island. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations has amounted to 2,664.7 cubic yards, equal to 
3.77 cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall 
works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers and siphons 
indicate that they are free from deposit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FREDERICK D. SMITH, 

Engineer of Sewerage Works. 
Boston, January 1, 1916. 



APPENDIX 



136 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No . 1 . 



Contracts made and pending during 

[Note. — The details of contracts made before 



10 



11 



Number 

of 
Contract. 



3541 



3571 



359i 



362i 



363i 



364 



364-A 



365i 



366i 



367i 



368 



2. 

WORK. 



Constructing water pipe tun- 
nel under Chelsea Creek, be- 
tween East Boston and Chel- 



Steel tank or reservoir on Bel- 
levue Hill, Boston. 



Laying 24-inch water pipes in 
Boston, Milton and Quincy. 

3,930 tons 60-inch cast iron 
water pipe; 120 tons special 
castings. 



2,800 tons 60-inch cast iron 
water pipe; 100 tons special 
castings. 



Furnishing and installing hy- 
draulic machinery at Sud- 
bury Dam, Southborough. 

Furnishing and installing elec- 
tric machinery at Sudbury 
Dam, Southborough. 

90 tons 4-inch to 48-inch special 
castings. 



Furnishing and laying 24-inch 
and 60-inch steel pipe, Bos- 
ton, Milton and Newton. 



Water valves; 9 12-inch, 4 16- 
inch, 4 20-inch and 3 24-inch 
screw lift valves. 



Masonry tower on Bellevue 
Hill, Boston. 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



15 
4 



11 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



$62,695 00 

19,540 00 

16,225 00 
87,547 50 



3,305 00 



46,900 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



§60,300 00 2 

19,397 00 2 

15,208 202 
82,908 00 2 



13,737 00 


11,760 002 


22,112 00 


19,349 002 


4,410 00 


4,365 00 2 


3,460 00 


3,320 GO 2 



3,225 002 



46,000 002 



6. 

Contractor. 



Coleman Bros., Chel- 
sea, Mass. 



Walsh's H o 1 y o k e 
Steam Boiler Works, 
Holyoke, Mass. 

John J. Evans, Law- 
rence, Mass. 

United States Cast 
Iron Pipe & Foundry 
Co., Philadelphia, 
Penn. 

United States Cast 
Iron Pipe & Foundry 
Co., Philadelphia, 
Penn. 

S. Morgan Smith Co., 
York, Penn. 



Westinghouse Electric 
& Mfg. Co., Pitts- 
burgh, Penn. 

Standard Cast Iron 
Pipe & Foundry Co., 
Bristol, Penn. 

Walsh's Holyoke 
Steam Boiler Works, 
Holyoke, Mass. 



Pratt & Cady Co., 
Inc., Boston, Mass. 



John Cashman & Sons 
Co., Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 

3 Contractor for No. 362 agreed to accept prices bid under that contract ior additional quantities in- 
cluded in No. 363. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



137 



Appendix No . 1 . 



the Year 1915 — Water Works. 

1915 have been given in previous reports.] 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



9, 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1915. 



Apr. 27, 1914 

Aug. 7, 1914 

Aug. 4, 1914 

Nov. 25, 1914 

Nov. 28, 1914 

June 23, 1915 

June 23, 1915 

Feb. 13, 1915 

Feb. 23, 1915 

Feb. 15, 1915 

Apr. 23, 1915 



Feb. 20, 1915 

June 12, 1915 

Aug. 7, 1915 
July 20, 1915 

Sept. 20, 1915 



July 20, 1915 



Sept. 1, 1915 



Aug. 16, 1915 



See previous report, 



For whole work, $19,397, 



See previous report, 



For pipes, $19.60 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for special 
castings, $49 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



For pipes, $19.60 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for special 
castings, $49 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



For furnishing and installing hydraulic machinery at 
the Sudbury Dam, in Southborough, $11,760. 



For furnishing and installing electric machinery at 
the Sudbury Dam, in Southborough, $19,349. 



For special castings, $48.50 per ton of 2,000 pounds, . 



Fur furnishing and laying 76.58 lin. ft. of 24-inch steel 
pipe in two lines over N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., $750; 
furnishing and laying 134 lin. ft. of 24-inch steel pipe 
in one line over Neponset River, $850; furnishing 
and laying 85.8 lin. ft. 60-inch steel pipe in one line 
under Boston & Albany R.R., $1,720. 

For 12-inch screw lift valves, $110 each; for 16-inch 
screw lift valves, $140 each; for 20-inch screw lift 
valves, $205 each; for 24-inoh screw lift valves, $285 
each. 

For tower complete with all appurtenances, $46,000, . 



63,405 01 


19,795 14 


20,795 62 


78,838 14 


68,271 50* 


10,000 00 


15,000 00 


4,534 07 


3,320 00 



3,225 00 



41,000 00 



10 



11 



* Does not include $2,369.46 for pipes for Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 



138 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 



i. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



2. 

WORK. 



369 



370i 



371i 



372i 



373 



35-Mi 



b6-Mi 



37-Mi 



39-M 



40-M 



Laying 60-inch water pipes in 
Newton. 



Laying 60-inch water pipes in 
Newton. 



27,595 lbs. 24-inch to 66-inch 
special castings. 



Hand traveling crane for Sud- 
bury Dam, Southborough. 

Underground cable for hydro- 
electric plant at Sudbury 
Dam. 

400 tons C. C. B. New River 
coal for Arlington pumping 
station. 

700 tons C. C. B. New River 
coal for Spot Pond pumping 
station. 

4,000 tons Beaver Run coal for 
Chestnut Hill pumping sta- 
tions, and 260 tons Sterling 
coal for Hyde Park pumping 
station. 



Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
the Sudbury Dam. 

800 tons C. C. B. New River 
coal for Spot Pond pumping 
station. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



11 



10 



3 
l 5 



Chest- 
nut 
Hill 
sta- 
tions, 

5. 
Hyde 
Park 
sta- 
tion, 
3. 



Amount op Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



$32,615 00 



27,282 30 



1,007 22' 



965 00 



1.28 2 per 
ton. 



5.30 per 
ton. 



.33 per 
ton. 



$5.25 per 
ton. 



5. 

Lowest. 



$32,369 00 2 



27,177 50 2 



950 00 

880 00» 
1,182 61 2 



$4.20 per 
ton. 



5.102 per 
ton. 



1.10 2 per 
ton. 



3.10 2 per 
ton. 



6. 

Contractor. 



Andrew M. Cusack, 
Boston. 



Charles A. Kelley, 
Somerville, Mass. 



United States Cast 
Iron Pipe & Foundry 
Co., Philadelphia, 
Penn. 

Wonham, Sanger & 
Bates, Inc., Boston. 

Safety Insulated Wire 
& Cable Co., Bos- 
ton. 

Bader Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Bader Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Worcester. 



Edison Electric Illu- 
minating Co., Bos- 
ton. 

Bader Coal Co., Bos* 
ton. 



i Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 

6 Two other proposals received which did not conform to requirements of specifications. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



139 



the Year 1915 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1915. 



Apr. 30, 1915 



May 18, 1915 



Dec. 11, 1915 



June 4, 1915 

Aug. 9, 1915 
Dec. 2, 1915 

June 25, 1914 
June 25, 1914 

June 25, 1914 



July 20, 1915 

Oct. 26, 1915 

Apr. 21, 1915 

Apr. 10, 1915 

May 21, 1915 



Dec. 21, 1914 



June 15, 1915 



For laying 60-inch cast iron pipe, $3.74 per lin. ft.; 
for laying 12-inch cast iron pipe for blow-offs, $1 
per lin. ft. ; for rock excavation above regular grade 
of the bottom of the trench, $7.40 per cu. yd. ; for 
rock excavation below regular grade of the bottom 
of the trench, $7.40 per cu. yd. ; for earth excavation 
below regular grade of bottom of trench, $1.50 per 
cu. yd.; for chambers for air valves, $49 each; for 
chambers for blow-off and by-pass valves, $55 each; 
for chamber for 36-inch valve, $55; for concrete 
masonry, $6.75 per cu. yd. 

For laying 60-inch cast iron pipe, $3.75 per lin. ft.; for 
laying 12-inch and 16-inch cast iron pipe for blow- 
offs, $1.50 per lin. ft. ; for rock excavation above the 
regular grade of the bottom of the trench, $5 per 
cu. yd. ; for rock excavation below the regular grade 
of the bottom of the trench, $5 per cu. yd. ; for earth 
excavation below the regular grade of the bottom 
of the trench, $1 per cu. yd.; for chambers for 
valves, $60 each; tor concrete masonry, $10 per cu. 

yd. 

For special castings, $73 per ton of 2,000 pounds, 



For furnishing and installing a 6-ton hand traveling 
crane, $880. 

For furnishing and installing about 1 ,550 feet of 15,000- 
volt, 3-conductor cable, $1,182.61. 



$4.28 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at the 
Arlington station. 

$5.10 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at the 
Spot Pond station. 



1.02 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at the 
Chestnut Hill stations; $4.10 per ton of 2,240 pounds 
delivered on cars at the Hyde Park station. 



3.25 per thousand kilowatt hours. Estimated 
amount of electric energy available per year, 3,000,- 
000 kilowatt hours. 

5.10 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at the 
Spot Pond station. 



$47,900 00 



33,349 56 



1,082 55 



880 00 


15 


500 00 


16 


1,705 54 


17 


3,642 61 


18 



17,027 87 



2,758 65 



12 



13 



14 



19 



20 



21 



• For Sonman coal, $3.89, for Sterling coal, $3.94 and for Beaver Run, Riverside or Davenport coal, 
$4.02 per ton. 

7 Contract based upon bid of $6.25 per M. kilowatt hours for entire output. Bid of $5.50 per M. kilo- 
watt hours for at least one-third of output and of $3 per M. kilowatt hours for at least two-thirds of 
output also received. 



140 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 



22 



23 



24 



25 



1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



41-M 



42-M 



43-M 



44-Mi 



45-M 



Special 1 
Order. 



Special J 
Order. 

Agree- 
ment. 



2. 
WORK. 



5,000 ton3 Alpha Special coal 
for Chestnut Hill pumping 
stations, and 80 tons Alpha 
Special coal for Pegan pump- 
ing station, Natick. 



150 tons Ralphton Mine coal 
for Hyde Park pumping sta- 
tion. 

450 tons Brazil Smokeless coal 
for Arlington pumping sta- 
tion. 

Surface water drains at Spot 
Pond. 



Electrically operated sluice 
gates for Sudbury power 
plant. 

3 tons 4-inch cast iron pipe, 
30 tons 12-inch pipe. 



10 sets steelwork for chambers 
for 36-inch valves. 

3 horizontal type hydraulic 
governors. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



Chest- 
nut 
Hill 
sta- 
tions, 

6. 
Pegan 
sta- 
tion, 
4. 



14 



Amount op Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



1.25 2 per 
ton. 



1.10 per 
ton. 



1.302 per 
ton. 



3,223 50 



4,125 00 



727 05 



390 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



-8 



1.20 per 
ton. 



$4.05 2 per 
ton. 



1.25 per 
ton. 



3,208 102 



3,915 002 



701 402 



360 00 2 



S. 



Contractor. 



H. N. Hartwell & Son, 
Boston. 



Quemahoning Coal 
Co., Boston. 



Hetherington & Co., 
Philadelphia, Penn. 



Thomas Russo & Co. 
Boston. 



Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Warren Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., Phillips- 
burg, N. J,. 

F. A. Houdlette & Son, 
Boston. 

Lombard Governor 
Co., Ashland, Mass. 



s For Sterling Elmora or Riverside coal, $3.97, for Davenport coal, 

per ton. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 



and for Alpha Special coal, 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



141 



the Year 1915 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Deo. 31, 

1915. 



June 15, 1915 



June 15, 1915 
June 15, 1915 
Oct. 2, 1915 



Oct. 7, 1915 

Feb. 13, 1915 

Jan. 27, 1915 

July 21, 1915 



Nov. 27, 1915 



Feb. 22, 1915 
Mar. 13, 1915 



I per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at the 
Chestnut Hill stations; $4.25 per ton of 2,240 pounds 
delivered on cars at the Natick Station on the Bos- 
ton & Albany Railroad. 



L05 per ton of 2,24C pounds delivered on cars at the 
Hyde Park pumping station. 



1.30 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at the 
Arlington pumping station. 



For furnishing and laying 15-inch vitrified clay pipe, 
$0.98 per lin. ft.; for furnishing and laying 12-inch 
vitrified clay pipe, $0.77 per lin. ft. ; for constructing 
paved open channel, $0.60 per lin. ft.; for rock ex- 
cavation, $4 per cu. yd.; for manholes, $20 each; 
for catch basins, — Type A, $42 each; Type B, $25 
each. 

For famishing and installing three electrically op- 
erated sluice gates, $3,915. 



For 4-inch pipe, $23.80 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for 
12-inch pipe, $21 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



For each set, $36, 



For whole work, $2,404, 



$10,642 22 



22 



552 43 



857 97 



3,683 22 



23 



24 



25 



1,000 0o 

732 41 

360 00 
2,404 00 



26 
27 

28 

29 



$457,263 51 



Contract completed. 



9 Competitive bids were not received. 



142 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1915 — Water Works 

Concluded. 
Summary of Contracts, 1895 to 1915, inclusive. l 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1915. 



Distribution Department, 11 contracts 

Sudbury Department, 5 contracts, . . . . 

353 contracts completed from 1896 to 1914, inclusive, 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 380 contracts 

1 In this summary contracts charged to maintenance are excluded, 



$384,434 04 

27,462 55 

16,948,522 40 



$17,360,418 99 
512,000 00 



$16,848,418 99 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



143 












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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



145 





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OS 


eo 


CO 


t»» 


© 


CM 


t^ 


l-H 




•^I'Bnu'Bf 


© 


00 


■* 


CO 


o 


■* 


CO 


CO 


us 


oo 


-* 


Tj* 


eo 


no 


"3 


t- 


no 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


CO 




























T3 
































T3 






























A 




























S 


M 


. 


























f 


2 

03 


H 


























if 






• 


• 


• 


4 


. 


% 


• 


• 


u 

• fH 

1 

i 

Ph 






CD 

ax 


g 




a 






„ 


s 


^3 


Q 


© 


s 




c3 


OJ 

S3 
> 
< 


73 

3 




o 

•+5 
<1> 

o 

a 
'& 


a 
o 

i 

to 
CO 

1-3 


a 


a 
o 

to 

o 


>> 


bfl 

a 

1 

u 


§ 


I 

C3 

u 
o 

u 


o 

u 


i 

+s 

a 


CJ 

o 


«*H 

o 

<B 
bD 
c« 
E 

o 

> 

< 


QQ 

i 

E 

> 






' 














eo 


1 

J3 


-<J 




•poqBJO^T7^y 


•poqeja^'B^ 


Cj 
Hi 


o 










^^eenqOB^V 


idnqpng 




o 









146 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





Table No. 


2.— 


Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, 


Mass., in 


1915. 




Day op Month. 


>> 

03 


>, 

05 

S3 
u 

© 
ft, 


o 


P. 

< 


eS 

3 


© 

•-5 


•~3 


+3 

m 
< 


a 

a 

03 

•+J 

a 
o 
w 


© 

O 
o 
O 


u 

<D 

a 
% 

o 


a 

© 
a 
© 

Q 


1, . 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


0.70 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2, 










0.06i 


2 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


2.70 


0.45 


- 


0.74 


0.09 


0.071 


3, 










- 


1.223 


- 


1.26i 


0.12 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.34 


3.64 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.17 


- 


0.28 


- 


- 


0.59 


0.27 


- 


6, 










2 


0.39 


- 


0.21 


- 


0.23 


- 


0.34 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7, 










0.84 


2 


- 


- 


2 


0.12 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


8, 










- 


0.141 


- 


- 


0.54 


- 


2.26 


- 


- 


0.78 


- 


0.041 


9, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.16 


0.07 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10, 


































11, 










- 


- 


- 


0.27 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12, 










2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.24 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13, 










2.20 3 


- 


- 


- 


0.19 


- 


- 


0.72 


0.07 


- 


- 


2 


14, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.23 


- 


2 


2.221 


15, 










- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.19 


- 


- 


- 


0.29 


0.98 


- 


16, 










- 


0.60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17, 










2 


- 


- 


- 


0.20 


0.27 


0.06 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


18, 










1.45 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.98 


19, 










0.21 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.30 


0.49 


- 


- 


- 


1.51 


- 


20, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.28 


- 


- 


- 


0.53 


- 


- 


21, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.16 


- 


1.00 


- 


- 


- 


22, 










- 


- 


0.08i 


- 


0.42 


- 


0.20 


0.84 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23, 










1.393 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


0.23 


24, 










- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.193 


- 


25, . 










1.113 


1.49 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.22 


0.20 


- 


- 


- 


2 


26, . 










- 


0.041 


- 


- 


0.20 


0.46 


- 


- - 


0.20 


0.27 


- 


1.103 


27, . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.35 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28, . 










0.071 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.263 


29, . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.74 


2 


- 


- 


0.35 


0.693 


30, . 










- 


- 


- 


0.35 


- 


0,10 


- 


0.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31, . 










0.503 


- 


- 


- 




1.20 


0.07 


- 


-. 


- 


- 


- 


Totals, 


7.83 


3.88 


0.08 


2.09 


1.84 


3.50 


7.92 


7.21 


1.50 


3.20 


3.39 


6.59 



i Snow. 



Total for the year 49.03 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



3 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



147 



Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1915. 



Day op Month. 


a 

03 


>> 

u 

03 

u 

O 


a 
u 

cS 


ft 

< 


>> 

03 


©' 


i 

>> 
i-s 


+5 


© 

a 

-t-> 


O 

O 


a 

a 

> 
o 


a 
© 

© 


1, . . . . ' . 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2, 










0.02i 


2 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


2 


0.83 


- 


1.13 


0.03 


0.021 


3, 










- 


1.093 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2.77 


0.11 


- 


- 


0.04 


- 


4, 










- 


- 


- 


1.101 


2 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5, 










- 


2 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


0.32 


2 


- 


2 


0.34 


- 


6, 










- 


0.36 


- 


0.13 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


0.43 


- 


- 


7, 










0.58 


2 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


2.90 


2 


2 


- 


- 


V 










- 


0.073 


- 


- 


0.38 


0.36 


2.10 


- 


0.01 


0.65 


- 


0.07 1 


9, 
10, 
11, 










- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


- 


- 










2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.01 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12, 










2 


0.02 


- 


0.22 


0.01 


- 


0.11 


- 


- 


- 


0.04 


- 


13, 










2.043 


- 


- 


- 


0.21 


- 


- 


0.72 


0.10 


- 


- 


2 


14, 










- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.96 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1.633 


15, 










0.07 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 




- 


- 


0.55 


0.67 


- 


16, 










- 


0.69 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


17, 










2 


- 


COP 


- 


0.23 


0.38 


0.01 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


18, 










2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.69 


19, 










1.55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.11 


0.59 


- 


0.15 


- 


1.08 


- 


20, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.33 


2 


- 


- 


0.11 


- 


- 


21, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.12 


- 


0.70 


- 


- 


- 


22, 










2 


- 


2 


2 


0.59 


2 


- 


0.90 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23, 










0.653 


2 


0.023 


0.01 


- 


0.15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


0.29 


24, 










2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


0.01 


- 


0.071 




25, 










0.933 


1.14 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.19 


- 


- 


- 


2 


26, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.17 


0.08 


2 


- 


0.04 


0.10 


- 


0.663 


27, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.21 


- 


- 


- 


- . 


- 


28, 










0.01 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.17 


29, 










- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.69 


2 


- 


- 


0.24 


0.803 


30, 










- 


- 


O.Oli 


1.00 


- 


2.03 


0.04 


0.12 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


31, 










0.643 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


otals 


, 


6.49 


3.37 


0.04 


2.46 


1.63 


3.47 


7.92 


5.80 


1.03 


2.99 


2.51 


5.33 



i Snow. 



Total for the year 43.04 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



8 Rain and snow. 



148 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1915. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Jan. 1, . 


.051 


11.20 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. 


May 2, . 


\ .19 


10.45 p.m. to 




Jan. 2, . 


\ .031 


11.05 p.m. to 


May 3, . 


/ 




7.30 a.m. 


Jan. 3, . 




12.10 A.M. 


May 3, . 


\ .04 


11.30 p.m. to 




Jan. 7, . 


.72 


3.55 a.m. to 9.30 a.m. 


May 4, . 


J 




1.20 A.M. 


Jan. 12, . 


"1 2.07 2 


1.55 a.m. to 


May 7, . 


1 .16 


5.45 p.m. to 




Jan. 13, . 




6.10 A.M. 


May 8, . 


j 




8.00 A.M. 


Jan. 13, . 


.31i 


6.10 A.M. to 12.45 P.M. 


May 13, . 


.13 


12.30 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


Jan. 17, . 


1 1.55 


5.30 p.m. to 


May 17, . 


.25 


6.50 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


Jan. 18, . 




5.10 A.M. 


May 21, . 


\ .55 


1.00 p.m. to 




Jan. 19, . 


.05 


8.15 A.M. to 8.30 A.M. 


May 22, . 




4.20 a.m. 


Jan. 23, . 


.081 


12.45 a.m. to 8.05 a.m. 


May 26, . 


.lti 


11.30 A.M. to 


6.45 p.m. 


Jan. 23, . 


\ .45 


8.05 a.m. to 














Jan. 24, . 




12.10 A.M. 


Total, 


1.48 






Jan. 24, . 


( .901 


9.20 p.m. to 










Jan. 25, . 


.23 


7.30 a.m. 
7.30 a.m. to 11.00 A.M. 










Jan. 25, . 










Jan. 31, . 


\ .452 


4.00 p.m. to 










Feb. 1, . 




6.15 A.M. 


June 6, . 


\ .39 


9.30 a.m. to 










June 8, . 


J 




6.10 A.M. 


Total, 


6.89 




June 15, . 


I .04 


7.45 a.m. to 










June 16, . 
June 17, . 


} .50 


2.35 a.m. to 


7.30 a.m. 








1.15 P.M. 


Feb. 1, . 


\ .872 


9.20 a.m. to 


June 19, . 


.05 


6.30 p.m. to 


7.15 p.m. 


Feb. 2, . 




7.00 A.M. 


June 20, . 


.14 


12.15 p.m. to 


2.45 p.m. 


Feb. 2, . 


{ .381 


7.00 a.m. to 


June 26, . 


.11 


4.50 a.m. to 


7.45 a.m. 


Feb. 3, . 




1.20 A.M. 


June 30, . 


\ 4.19 


11.05 p.m. to 




Feb. 6, . 


.29 


4.25 a.m. to 10.30 a.m. 


July 1, . 




7.30 a.m. 


Feb. 7, . 


\ .132 


10.15 p.m. to 














Feb. 8, . 




5.40 a.m. 


Total, 


5.42 






Feb. 12, . 


.04 
\ .70 


6.00 A.M. to 7.15 A.M. 

12.45 a.m. to 










Feb. 15, . 










Feb. 16, . 




6.50 a.m. 










Feb. 16, . 


.04 


9.30 a.m. to 10.30 a.m. 


July 1, . 


\ 2.23 


7.30 a.m. to 




Feb. 23, . 


\ .07 


6.00 p.m. to 


July 3, . 




4.35 a.m. 


Feb. 24, . 




7.15 A.M. 


July 4, . 


.08 


12.45 a.m. to 


4.10 A.M. 


Feb. 24, . 


i .92 


8.20 p.m. to 


July 5, . 


.46 


10.00 A.M. to 


2.00 p.m. 


Feb. 25, . 




4.30 p.m. 


July 8, . 
July 9, . 


\ 1.94 


6.05 a.m. to 


1.15 A.M. 








/ 




Total, 


3.44 




July 11, . 


\ .09 


11.30 p.m. to 










July 12, . 
July 14, . 


} .12 


4.05 a.m. to 


3.05 a.m. 








4.50 a.m. 


Apr. 3, . 


\ .851 


10.30 a.m. to 


July 14, . 


.17 


1.20 p.m. to 


4.10 p.m. 


Apr. 4, . 




4.35 a.m. 


July 17, . 


.03 


2.30 p.m. to 


2.45 p.m. 


Apr. 6, . 


.15 


7.40 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. 


July 19, . 


.16 


4.40 p.m. to 11.05 p.m. 


Apr. 11, . 


\ .16 


6.15 p.m. to 


July 21, . 


.10 


12.55 a.m. to 


7.00 A.M. 


Apr. 12, . 




3.25 a.m. 


July 27, . 


.36 


12.55 a.m. to 


7.15 A.M. 


Apr. 16, . 


.51 


8.45 a.m. to 1.20 p.m. 


July 27, . 


.05 


2.00 p.m. to 


2.20 p.m. 


Apr. 26, . 


.02 


4.20 p.m. to 4.40 p.m. 


July 28, . 


\ .62 


9.40 p.m. to 




Apr. 30, . 


\ 1.23 


6.15 a.m. to 


July 29, . 




4.55 a.m. 


May 1, . 


7.30 a.m. 


July 29, . 
Total, 


.34 


3.30 p.m. to 


4.50 p.m. 


Total, 


2.92 


6.75 





1 Snow. 



2 Kain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



149 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1915 — 

Concluded. 



Date. 



3, 

i. 

7, 

9, 



Aug. 2, 
Aug. 3, 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. i 
Aug. 10, . 
Aug. 13, . 
Aug. 22, . 
Aug. 23, . 
Aug. 25, . 
Aug. 29, . 
Aug. 30, . 

Total, 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 21, 
Sept. 24, 
Sept. 26, 

Total, 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 15, . 
Oct. 20, . 
Oct. 26, . 
Oct. 27, . 
Oct. 29, . 

Total, 



Amount. 



.33 

.04 
2.61 

.51 

.21 

.94 

1.42 

.21 

.12 



6.39 



Duration. 



4.35 p.m. 

3.50 p.m. 
10.30 A.M. 

7.05 a.m. 
2.15 p.m. 
1.10 A.M. 
7.00 A.M. 

3.40 a.m. 
2.30 p.m. 



to 

2. 
to 11 
to 

9. 
to 5. 
to 7. 
to 6. 



50 A.M. 

,50 p.m. 

30 A.M. 
00 P.M. 

45 p.m. 

00 A.M. 



.50 A.M. 
.10 A.M. 



2. 
to 7.] 
to 

2.25 p.m. 



.16 
.81 
.02 
.03 



1.02 



1.17 

.43 

.57 

.49 
.12 
.10 

.02 



2.90 



3.15 a.m. to 9.25 a.m. 

10.00 a.m. to 5.20 p.m. 

8.25 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. 

1.50 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. 



1.30 a.m. to 

1.30 A.M. 

9.45 a.m. to 

7.45 a.m. 
8.45 p.m. to 

11.15 A.M. 
8.15 a.m. to 10.15 A.M. 
10.30 a.m. to 9.15 p.m. 
11.15 p.m. to 

2.15 a.m. 
12.10 p.m. to 12.20 p.m. 



Date. 



Nov. 4, 
Nov. 5, 
Nov. 12, 
Nov. 14, 
Nov. 15, 
Nov. 19, 
Nov. 24, 
Nov. 29, 

Total, 



Dec. 2, 
Dec. 8, 
Dec. 9, 
Dec. 13, 
Dec. 14, 
Dec. 14, 
Dec. 17, 
Dec. 18, 
Dec. 23, 
Dec. 24, 
Dec. 25, 
Dec. 26, 
Dec. 26, 
Dec. 28, 
Dec. 29, 

Total, 



Amount. 



.33 

.08 
.70 

.98 

.051 

.26 



2.38 



.051 
.09 1 

1.45 

.071 
1.27 

.28 

.77 

.161 
.30 

891 



5.33 



Duration. 



7.00 p.m. to 

8.00 p.m. 
6.00 p.m. to 11.25 p.m. 
9.15 p.m. to 

11.55 A.M. 
11.00 a.m. to 7.00 P.M. 

1.10 A.M.' tO 5.30 A.M. 

10.45 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. 



2.40 p.m. 
8.45 a.m. 

4.15 p.m. 

4.35 a.m. 
11.45 A.M. 

12.30 p.m. 

3.20 p.m. 

12.35 p.m. 

6.20 a.m. 

11.30 A.M. 



to 5.30 p.m. 
to 

6.05 a.m. 
to 

4.35 a.m. 
to 8.45 a.m. 
to 

8.30 p.m. 
to 

12.35 a.m. 
to 

12.35 p.m. 
to 3.10 p.m. 
to 6.30 p.m. 
to 11.15 P.M. 



Total for year 44.92 inches. 
1 Snow. 



150 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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152 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



73 

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156 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



157 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



161 





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162 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 

drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct. 



Month. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, . 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



15 

14 
27 
25 
15 
16 
24 
26 
20 
27 
25 
26 



260 



Actual Time. 



Hours. 



152 
122 

264 
234 
169 
191 
242 
334 
416 
364 
227 
251 



2,970 



Minutes. 



22 
14 

27 

30 

52 

52 

5 

15 

30 
50 



57 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



1,664.8 
1,312.9 
2,722.7 
2,246.9 
1,858.8 
1,720.2 
2,824.0 
2,269.3 
2,468.5 
2,451.6 
1,974.7 
2,138.0 



25,652.4 



Total actual time, 123.79 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 25,652,400,000 gallons. 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, . 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



31 

28 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
28 
17 
31 



349 



Actual Time. 



Hours. 



744 
672 
744 
693 
744 
716 
744 
744 
708 
648 
398 
741 



8,297 



Minutes. 



30 



15 



15 



30 



30 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



1,134.9 

1,018.6 

1,138.5 

1,063.5 

1,138.5 

1,032.5 

1,040.2 

1,042.4 

992.6 

913.1 

569.8 

1,169.5 



12,254.1 



Total actual time, 345.73 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 12,254,100,000 gallons. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



163 



Table No. 13 — Concluded. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



Actual Time 
(Hours). 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, . 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



31 
28 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 



365 



744 
672 
744 
720 
744 
720 
744 
744 
720 
744 
720 
744 



8,760 



2,037.0 
1,810.5 
1,874.3 
1,737.5 
1,775.4 
1,981.9 
1,826.1 
1,862.8 
2,069.9 
2,026.3 
2,281.3 
1,807.4 



23,090.4 



Total actual time, 365 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 23,090,400,000 gallons. 



Table No. 14. 



Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 
1915 by Months. 1 



Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 

into 
Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons). 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


• Cochituate 
Aqueduct 
into 

Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


January 


53,519,000 


36,610,000 


65,710,000 


- 


February, 












46,693,000 


36,379,000 


64,661,000 


- 


March, 












87,635,000 


36,726,000 


60,461,000 


- 


April, . 












74,710,000 


35,450,000 


57,917,000 


- 


May, . 












59,784,000 


36,726,000 


57,271,000 


- 


June, . 












57,150,000 


34,417,000 


66,063,000 


- 


July, . 












90,903,000 


33,555,000 


58,906,000 


- 


August, 












73,026,000 


33,626,000 


60,090,000 


- 


September, 










•• 


82,103,000 


33,087,000 


68,997,000 


- 


October, 




a 








78,903,000 


29,452,000 


65,365,000 


- 


November, 












65,617,000 


18,993,000 


76,043,000 


- 


December, 












68,764,000 


37,726,000 


58,303,000 


- 


Average 




70,092,000 


33,573,000 


63,261,000 


- 



1 Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



164 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 









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170 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



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High 
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High 

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Portions of 

Boston 

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Revere, 

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Medford and 
Somerville 
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Portions of 

Charlestown, 

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Maiden, 

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o 


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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



175 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE $OARD. 



177 



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178 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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184 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



185 



Table No. 33. 



Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 
from 1892 to 1915. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 







Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation. 


Ammonia. 


6 
O 


Nitrogen 
as 


T3 

o> 

a 

m 

a 
o 
u 

a 

bO 

>. 
a 

.o 






u 
o3 

a 

t., o3 

to 
O 


u 

03 

s s 

-3 03 

03 
£ 


O 
Eh 


a 
.2 

"•3 

'3 

m 
m 
O 


6 

o> 


ALBUMINOID. 


m 
O 

03 
u 

.13 
55 


0Q 

+= 

•fi 




Year. 


o 
H 


to 

s 


02 


72 
03 

c 

03 

w 


1892, . 


.37 


.37 


4.70 


1.67 


.0007 


.0168 


.0138 


.0030 


.41 


.0210 


.0001 


- 


1.9 


1893, 




.61 


.53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0027 


.38 


.0143 


.0001 


.60 


1.8 


1894, 




.69 


.58 


4.64 


1.83 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0019 


.41 


.0106 


.0001 


.63 


1.7 


1895, 




.72 


.59 


4.90 


2.02 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0022 


.40 


.0171 


.0001 


.69 


0.7 


1896, 




.49 


.45 


4.29 


1.67 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0023 


.37 


.0155 


.0001 


.56 


1.4 


1897, 




.65 


.55 


4.82 


1.84 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


.0137 


.0001 


.64 


1.6 


1898, 




.41 


.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.00°° 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.0097 


.0001 


.44 


1.4 


1899, 




.23 


.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.0137 


.0001 


.35 


1.1 


1900, 




.24 


.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.0076 


.0001 


.38 


1.3 


1901, 




.24 


.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.0173 


.0001 


.42 


1.7 


1902, 




.26 


.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.0092 


.0000 


.40 


1.3 


1903, 




.25 


.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.0142 


.0001 


.39 


1.5 


1904, 




- 


.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.0110 


.0001 


.37 


1.5 


1905, 




- 


.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.0083 


.0001 


.35 


1.4 


1906, 




- 


.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.0054 


.0001 


.36 


1.3 


1907, 




- 


.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.0068 


.0001 


.32 


1.3 


1908, 




- 


.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.0092 


.0001 


.26 


1.2 


1909, 




- 


.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.0034 


.0000 


.25 


1.3 


1910, 




- 


.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.0030 


.0000 


.22 


1.1 


1911, 




- 


.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.0029 


.0000 


.33 


1.4 


1912, 




- 


.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.0062 


.0000 


.29 


1.7 


1913, 




- 


.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.0064 


.0000 


.26 


1.5 


1914, 




- 


.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.0076 


.0000 


.25 


1.4 


1915, 




- 


.16 


3.73 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.00481 


.00001 


.251 


1.4 



Averages for 7 months, January to July inclusive. 



186 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






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CM 




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& 9 




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03 




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CO 




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us 




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eo 


CN 


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CM 


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CO 


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CO 


tH 


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a b 


3 








































03 «J 








































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og 








































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3 « 

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US 


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CJS 


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oo 


CO 


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o 


CO 


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1 


1 




CD 


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CO 


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o 


CO 


t>. 


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CM 


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CM 


T-l 


CO 


r^ 


-* 


us 








3 B 

S 03 


6 
55 


T3 
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CM 


eo 


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CM 


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t^ 


CO 


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fa - 












































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2 > 


eo 


o 
o 

03 

3 


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b- 


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l-H 


CO 


t^ 


us 


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oo 


CO 


CO 


o 




a H 


O 

55 


CO 


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CO 


eo 


CO 


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m 








































fa^ 














































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co 


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co 




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fr< 


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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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188 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 35. — Nmnber of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Vari- 
ous Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1915, inclusive. 

[Averages of weekly determinations.] 







Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


Southern Service Taps. 


Yeah. 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber. 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


Effluent 

Gate-house 

No. 2. 


Low Service, 

180 Boylston 

Street. 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place. 


1898, . ..-..■, 


207 


145 


Ill 


96 


- 


1899, 












224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900, 












248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901, 












225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902, 












203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903, 












76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904, 












347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905, 












495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906, 












231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907, 












147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908, 












162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909, 












198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910, 












216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911, 












205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912, 












429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913, 












123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914, 












288 


- 


252 


174 


220 


1915, 












163 


- 


128 


117 


134 


A^ 


r erag 




233 


201 


188 


157 


217 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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190 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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CO CO CO ^t* ^ ^ ^* ^ ii5 ^ *# CO 




•q^dgp-pjpi 


lonooioNiooooo 

COCO'*' , ^ , ' , #>0»0>Oit5»0'* 


CO 

co 


•90Bjjng 


t^o oooo cotes coos coo co c<» 

COt^OOOOOOOO"*COOOOOt^OO 

eococo'<*i>ocot^t^o«i5'*co 


1-H 

«o 


Framingham 1 

Reservoir No. 

3 (Depth 

at Place op 

Observation 

20.5 Feet). 


•rao^og 


Nt-(MU5COHrilO*NiO 

N!0<oowHO>uMoe«u5 

COniQO<ON(0<OIOT|IC<9 


1-1 
»o 


•q^d9p-pjK 


coooo5->#i-ie<icoo»ocooi 

eo t>T 00 ic" »«' t^." ^* (M* <m oo "* ■* 

COCOCO-^»fl«OI>.t>.t^US'!t<CO 


o 
eo 


•90Bjmg 


eoo(M<MC<ic»t^.ev«»cio>C5C<) 

«ot^^^c»oot^eo1— ioo«dcoio 

{OCOM'<1<lO<ONN!010Tj(CO 


OS 

CNI 

»o 


Wachu- 
sett 

Aque- 
duct. 


•|9UUBqQ 

ugdojopna 


W«5MiOl8»00>OOttO>0 
tJ<«0c0C0i-<OCNI»«00I>^0«t»I 

eococO"*»o«ocoia3?oiO' , *co 


OS 


Sudbury 1 
Reservoir 

(Depth 

at Place op 

Observation 

54.5 Feet). 


•rao^og; 


coco»ocooocoooocooo»oco 
t^i>^ooooi>.'coa>o050»o«oi>^ 

COCOCOrtiiO«0«000«OrticO 




•q^dgp-ptpi 


OOMPJiOOONOiOiOOUJO 
COI>.l35">*ICC>'^li-IOlO500eD»O 

cococoTttiotor^co^oiftTtico 


CsJ 

to 


•gosjing 


Tjfcot^^oot^csioo^-icooio 

lOl«I>.OOOOt~-CO<NOt>-I>-i» 

cococo-fuscot^t^t^io^co 


eo 

CO 

»o 


Wachusett l 
Reservoir 

(Depth 

at Place op 

Observation 

107 Feet). 


•uianoa 


oocNieot^co»ooo«ococo'* 

i-i«oi>.eoeoo5i-i<Meoeoooc3i 

■>*COCO'>*l , <l<'<*«S»0»0»0-<*ICO 


eo 

CO 


•q^dgp-pipi 


CO«OOOCOO"300 100050005 

■* ifl co o" ei" b-^ ■>* eo eo oo oo eo 

COCOCO'<* | T»<»OCDCOCOlO'*CO 


OS 


•goBjing 


OOhocjiooioihcoooo. 
■*io®Me>iMHOO!oooooo 

COCOCO'*»OCOt^.l>.«OlO^CO 


OO 
1— 1 


w 

O 






January, . 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 

October, . 

November, 

December, 


03 

© 
5>fi 
03 

© 

4 



>» 
8 
^3 



S 



^ 



02 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



191 



Table No. 38. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1915. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 











Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


S 

a 
1 


a 
a 


03 

3 


a 

a 
1 


a 
a 

'3 

S 


03 

3 


a 

1 
03 


a 
a 

'3 

i 


£3 
03 
<D 

3 


January, .... 


59 


i 


31.0 


59 


—i 


29.3 


57 





27.1 


February, 








59 


5 


32.3 


55 


i 


31.0 


57 


3 


28.6 


March, 








58 


12 


34.7 


58 


10 


33.8 


59 


11 


33.7 


April, 








84 


23 


50.3 


85 


20 


50.4 


85 


24 


49.2 


May, 








79 


34 


55.8 


77 


34 


55.5 


75 


30 


55.4 


June, 








89 


40 


64.3 


89 


36 


64.3 


- 


38 


- 


July, 








89 


51 


70.2 


88 


49 


69.8 


83 


52 


68.4 


August, . 








88 


48 


68.5 


86 


45 


67.2 


83 


46 


65.9 


September, 








94 


38 


65.6 


92 


37 


65.2 


87 


38 


64.5 


October, . 








76 


31 


54.5 


75 


27 


52.9 


71 


30 


52.4 


November, 








70 


25 


43.2 


69 


23 


40.9 


66 


24 


41.4 


December, 








62 


10 


31.5 


55 


2 


29.1 


59 


11 


29.7 


Averages, 


- 


- 


50.2 


- 


- 


49.1 


- 


- 


- 



192 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






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to 




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CM 






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1-H 




to 












t^ 






co 


1-H 

to 
















1-H 

to 






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co 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


OS CM 


co 




5 


oo 

to 
















OO 

to 






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CO 


1 


1 


CM 


1 


1 


1 


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00 
OS 






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1 


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CM 


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i-H 
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CM 


to 


1 


1 


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to us 








CO 


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t-- 


us 




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CO 




CO 












to 






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CM 




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1*1 
























































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1-H 
































CO 




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o 






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CD 


• 


• 


6 

CD 








nd 




US 






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p 








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OS 






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03 




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tl 




tJ3 






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CD 








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a 
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3 


. 




tfl 

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1 . 

CD 








T3 

CI 

C3 CO 




-o 












ft 

o 










rs 


of 




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CD 




gth owned and 

3et). 

e valves in same, 








-d a 


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a 


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T3 


s 


CD 


CD 

a 

c3 
CO 

.a 

co 
CD 






sngth owne 
alves in sa: 


CO 

i 


o 
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03 

TO 

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OT 


B 

cS 

CO 

# C 
to 

CD 
> 


CD 

a 

O 

•n 

c3 


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co 

ti 

CO 
CD 

> 

c3 


a 

03 

CO 

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tc 
CD 
> 








1 


fcJO 


a» 


> 


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+3 
tJO 


> 
CD 


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> 


1 






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0) 


c3 


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CD 


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u 




u 






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3 


1-3 


a 


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I-H 1 


a 


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hI o 


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^^ 

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9 a 



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CD CD 

S3 S3 



^ a 

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2 «" 

O CM 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



193 






e 

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© 



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cq 



feci 

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6 

w 
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CM 


o 


oo 


i—i 


i-i 


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C3S 




03 


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CO 


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CO 




t^ 


CO 




^9 


to 


CM 


•* 








o 


CM 




O 


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CO 






E-i 














rH 








CM 


CO 


1 


I 


1 


i 


<M 


CO 






t~ 


1*1 












•* 




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■* 




















CM 


OS 


CO 


<M 


CO 


i—i 


CN1 


o 






Iffl 


t^ 


•* 




CM 




t^ 


oo 




(O 


CO 












CO 








o 


tH 


i— 1 


■<* 


1 


i 




00 




00 


CO 




lO 








o 




aj 




















H 




















tu 






































fc 




















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CO 


CM 


1 


1 


1 


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1 


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cm 


CM 












CM 








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1 


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03 

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o 

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13 
> 



194 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



fO 
-S 

*c-i 
r— o 

ft, 
ft 

co 
co 

se 

© 

e 

co 
c*> 



« 




fc. 




<4> 




«> 




<4J 




CQ 




<© 




r« 


*© 




*-H 


K 


cr> 


•<s> 


>>i 










03 


>-l 


"Th 


uo 


S-. 




e 


© 


^ 
^ 


© 


s 


CO 


© 


i*e 


OS 

NO 


*- 

1 


s- 




*- 


*- 


C"< 


<4i 


•c-a 


1 


•c* 


s 


CO 


© 


<4i 


•to 


-S? 


(»■— > 


<U 


© 


S 


^ 


»*s 


o 




f«. 


^ 




a 




© 




Bs 




•^ 




co 




<W 




ft 




•e» 




fts 




fc. 




«4> 




**o 




© 




fc 





©> 



6 

H 

ffl 

< 







"* 


iffl 


CNI 


OO 


O 


1—1 


"* 


OO 


OS 


cs 


o 


O 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


!>• 


OS 




as 








CM 


CO 


•* 


'—< 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


I— 1 


CS 


CS 


cq 


»-h 


o 


cq 


T— 1 


CO 


co 


O 


OS 




o 






cm 


o> 


•O 


o 


CO 


o 


OS 


t^ 


CJ 


C3 


'CO 


in 


o 


CI 


o 


OS 


CO 


cq 


H 




in 








CM 


>* 


os 


CS 


<* 


>o 


CI 


CO 


m 


iO 


co 


■* 


IO 


CO 


CJ 


cq 


CO 


cq 


CM 




m 






N 




oo 










T-H 




























oo 




< 

H 
O 


















































in 


r^ 


cs 


t^ 


CO 


CS 


-* 


o 


y— i 


CO 


CI 


CO 


CO 


in 


CD 


T— I 


CO 


00 


OO 


m 


I 








CO 


cs 


** 


o 


OS 




-* 


o 


l>i 


cq 


CO 


cq 


co 


CO 


o 


m 


CD 


o 


OS 






-p 


"* 


« 


t^ 




CO 


O 


o 


t~- 


00 


lr^ 


ID~ 




CO 




OS 


1— 1 


t^ 


in 


T— 1 


t^ 








<D 
















































m 


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CO 


00 


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in 


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OS 




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CD 


CO 


■^ 








0) 


"* 


oo 


o 


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CM 


CD 


CO 


in 


t^ 


r^ 


O 


CO 


CO 


r^ 


CO 


m 


OS 






OS 








co 


•<* 


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-* 


CM 


CM 


co 


CO 


CI 


cq 


CJ 


cq 


cq 














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tH 




































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CO 


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CI 


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,_ 


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CS 


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CO 


»n 


l>~ 


OS 








CO 


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in 


CO 


o 


IO 




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co 


CO 




■^ 


m 


cq 


CO 


OS 


o 


CM 


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OO 


O 




CO 


CO 


in 


CO 


OS 


Cl 


eo 


CD 


CI 


OS 


OO 


CM 


t^ 


cq 


o 


in 








»* 










































CM 

CO 








oo 


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CS 


CD 


o 


t^ 


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CO 


cq 


cq 


in 


ID~ 


CO 


tr^ 




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as" 


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CM 


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CO 


CS 


CM 


o 


t^ 








in 


i-H 




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m 




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CO 






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CO 


** 


o 


CO 


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CO 


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in 


m 


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O 


CJ 


o 


m 


OS 


ID- 








CO 


CO 


O 


CM 


CD 


>o 


co 


co 


CO 


OO 


m 


o 


Cl 


CO 


co 


^H 


m 


o 


CM 


^*l 


CO 








OS 


co 


CS 


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■<* 


co 


>* 


in 


i^ 


o 


'CO 




m 


CO 


oo 


■* 


■* 


















































OS 
CO 






<e 




t-H 


co 


00 




<* 


CO 


CO 


o" 


co" 


CO 


o 






CD 


i>- 


-.f 


CO 


cm" 


CD 








N 






tJH 


-* 


IO 


Tj< 


T|H 


os 


CO 


CO 


in 


in 


O 


o 




CO 


t- 


in 










N 


CM 


CM 
































<» 










T-r 




































co" 








1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


-* 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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e- 














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CS 


























OS 


















































o 






GO 


us 


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00 


CI 


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00 


CM 


o 


m 


t- 


■<* 


o 


CO 


o 


^H 


CO 


CD 


CO 


o 


ID- 








t^. 


co 


oo 


Ir^ 


co 


in 




t^ 


<M 


'CS 


eo 


t^ 


cq 


t^- 


co 


m 


CO 


O 


OS 




1— 1 








CO 


ca 


co 




CO 


CJ 




CI 


t^ 


CJ 


in 


■* 


CO 


r^ 


r^ 


CD 


•* 


oo 


in 


GO 


















































OS 
GO 
CM 






00 




CO 


CO 


O 


OS 


»o 


CI 




in 






Cs" 




CO 


«* 


Tjl 


in 


■<* 


CO 


CO 








OO 


o 


OO 


CJ 


cq 


CO 


OS 


Cl 


co 


cq 


CO 


in 


CO 




CM 


CO 






CM 










t^ 


*-H 








^ 


























in 














































?— T 








CO 


iM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


cs 


CI 


CO 


CO 


r- 


t>- 


CM 


CD 


CO 


in 


tH 


CS 


o 


CO 


!-H 


O 








CO 






t-- 


CM 


CI 


co 


o 


-t< 




cq 




CM 


t^ 


CJ 


m 


r^ 


in 


o 


00 


t- 






o 


ID- 


co 


r-- 


CM 


co 


co 


CO 


CS 


co 


o 


t~- 


cq 


OS 


o 


co 


CS 


oo 


in 


CO 


m 
















































CO 
1-H 






T-4 


eo 


lO 


CO 




OS 


CM 


C5 


CO 


CS 


co" 


O 


oo 


O 


■*" 


i— I 


CO 


■* 




oo 


■"*" 










co 


lO 


CO 


CO 


Tfl 


«* 


CO 




CM 


i— i 


cq 


CM 


CJ 




T-l 








t^ 










CO 




































r- 






OS 


O 


co 


w 


CS 


^* 


«o 


CO 


^-, 


CS 


OS 


CO 


CO 


OS 


m 


^ 


o 


o 


■»* 


^*< 


t- 








OS 


■<* 


OS 


CO 


r~ 


CO 


C5 


CI 


o 


o 


m 


CO 


in 


Tt< 


CJ 






in 


1— ( 


OS 










■>* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-tfi 


o 




C3 


oo 


OS 


os 




in 


o 


"* 


b- 


o 




»- 


t^ 


















































eo 
eo 






CM 


c© 


Oi 


co 


lO 


in 


CD" 


CS 


o 


CI 


CO 


in 


«* 


cq 


•*" 


t- 


m 


Os" 




CO 


o 






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CM 


av 


00 


t^ 






C3 


CO 


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CM 




CM 


cq 














OS 










co 




































t^ 










^ 




































T-T 








1 


i 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


i 


1 


l 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


CO 


























C2 




















o 


CM 
























N 




















CM 


O 


























♦" 




















1-1 








CO 


i — i 


o 


lO 


i 


CO' 


1 


CO 


O 


in 


r^ 


1 


*# 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


m 


OS 


OS 








CM 


C-q 


US 


IO 




OS 




Cs 


cq 


CO 


t^ 




■* 










o 


-* 




CO 






** 




o 


CS 






OS 




in 


CS 


t^ 


oo 














o 


o 


•* 








»H 




io" 


t^." 


OS 




in" 




Os" 


<cf 


in 


rH 














^i" 


CO* 


>n 


CM 




























1-1 


















CO 






t- 


o 


^H 


iO 


CO' 


«* 


CI 


• •o 


CO 


o 


O 


1 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


I 


CO 


>* 








1D- 


o 


CM 


co 


(^ 


CD 


CO 


r- 


CJ 


o 


o 




o 














^n 


OS 






<o 


t- 


CM 


O 


t^ 




CT 


C3 


c^ 


CI 


CO 


•* 


















CO 






CO 














































a 

i — ■ 


tH 


ID- 


^H 


"* 


C5 


U5 


O 


CO 


CO 


in 


co" 




















>n 






CO 


•o 










CI 






CM 




















Os 








CN1 




































CO 








1 


1 


t^. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


I 


I 


ID- 


JD- 




00 






o 


































CO 


o 






1-1 






CO 


































CO 


o 






OS 


i — 1 


! — | 


1 


1 


o 


OS 


CO 


i 


1 


i 


1 


l 


1 


1 


i 


1 


i 


I 


CO 


OS 








CO 




CM 






o 


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r^ 
























m 


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e 


o 


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t^ 






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CO 


o 
























CO 


CM 

CO 






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CO 


t> " 


^o" 






N 


cm" 


























CO 








Id- 


CO 




































t* 1 














































,_l 








OS 


C-5 




1 


1 


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l 


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1 


1 


1 


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1 


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m 


m 








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o 








co 




























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OS 






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CO 


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^ 




























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in 


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cf 




























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CO 














































i—< 








i 


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1 


1 


1 


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1 


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t— I 








CM 


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1 


1 


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1 


1 


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1 


1 


1 


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1 


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1 


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m 


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co 


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co 




































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OS 


00 






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uo 


1 


1 


1 


[ 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


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1 


1 


1 


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1 


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t— 








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o 




































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CO 






o 


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o 








«* 


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CO" 




































eo 

CM 


-* 






o 


to 


1 


| 


I 


I 


1 


1 


i 


I 


1 


| 


1 


1 


1 


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1 


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t^ 




































GO 


ID- 






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CO 


■* 




































CM 








** 


os" 


aS 




































in" 
cq 


■* 






OS 


i~- 


1 


I 


1 


1 


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1 


i 


I 


1 


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1 


1 


1 


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1 


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CO 


OS 








OS 


CO 




































CO 


as 






eo 


o_ 


CO 




































t--^ 


^_; 






«* 


<M 


o" 




































CM 

CM 


■* 






CO 


1 


1 


| 


I 


1 


1 


i 


i 


| 


1 


I 


1 


1 


l 


1 


1 


I 


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co 


ID- 








I-— 






































t- 


CM 






o 


CO 






































«o_ 








«0 


eo" 
■<*l 






































ro 


00 






Q 


0> 














































W 


■+J 
















































o3 






































-l-i" 








o 






















- 
















-t-s" 

-1-3 




1 






3 
o 

w 


"3 °2 

» -a 

E3 t2 

CD ^ 


a 
o 

+a 

m 

o 


u 
s> 

a 

o 

GO 


a 


c3* 
CJ 

m 
1 

o 


-us 

■p 

CU 
■— 

> 


>> 
o 

a 

"B 
a 


Medford, 
Melrose, 
Revere, * 
Watertowr 


a 

o 

bi) 

.s 

< 


o 

3 


ft 


u 


s* 

a 

o 

-us 


■p 

a 

o 

S 


o 

1 


+s" 

c 


o 
o 

ft 

s 


"c3 

• -p 

O 


"3 

o 








No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



195 



Table No. 42. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 
Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 
31, 1915,. and the Number of Services and Meters installed during the Year 
1915. 



City ok Town. 


Services. 

- 


Meters. 


Fire 

Hydrants. 


Services 
Installed. 


Meters 
Installed. 


Boston, 


103,195 


54,848 


9,398 


1,380 


6,829 


Somerville, 














13,233 


9,155 


1,214 


210 


734 


Maiden, . 














8,055 


7,696 


565 


127 


93 


Chelsea, . 














4,971 


4,957 


384 


166 


169 


Everett, . 














5,893 


2,947 


581 


128 


343 


Quincy, . 










% 




9,315 


8,248 


1,078 


408 


197 


Medford, . 














6,043 


5,846 


668 


412 


406 


Melrose, . 














4,005 


4,211 


364 


99 


105 


Revere, l . 














4,466 


3,137 


288 


222 


433 


Watertown, 














2,798 


2,622 


379 


225 


141 


Arlington, 














2,753 


2,755 


461 


249 


247 


Milton, 














1,867 


1,926 


420 


110 


110 


Winthrop, 














2,903 


2,829 


271 


84 


82 


Stoneham, 














1,613 


1,589 


155 


35 


110 


Belmont, . 














1,430 


1,430 


236 


100 


100 


Lexington, 














1,156 


1,063 


184 


45 


118 


Nahant, . 














730 


468 


101 


77 


90 


Swampscott, 














1,810 


1,810 


181 


66 


66 


Totals, 


176,236 


117,537 


16,928 


4,143 


10,373 



1 Includes small portion of Saugus. 



196 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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S3 



CO 

e 

cq 

s 

•8 

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^ .§ 
IS 

so ^ 

<» oo 

-sg 

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CD 
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Ss 

©> 



CO 

6 
ft 

H 
iJ 
W 
< 

Eh 





**3 




i—i 


<M 


1—1 


^-i 


t^ 


-* 


^H 


o 


t~ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


O O 2 H 


•uinmraij\[ 


CM 




CM 


CM 


'CH 
CM 


CM 


<M 


CN 


CM 


K5 
CN 


us 

CM 


US 
CN 


us 

CM 


> 


1 « g « 


























































W 


<< Eh fc, *! 

fe "< fe 

>* £ O 




CN 


CM 


i— 1 


,_! 


<M 


CM 


CM 


i—l 


(M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


U2 

H 

o 


■umunxBpi 


CN 


CO 

<N 


CD 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CN 


CO 
CN 


CO 
CN 


CO 

CN 


CO 
CM 


i pj - 






























to 


O a H |z 
K £ o § 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CN 


CN 


•<*" 


CO 


CO 


•umunuij\[ 


<n 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Pn 


BOSTON MET 
POLITAN WA 

WORKS OFF 

1 ASHBURT 

PLACE. 


CN 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


<N 


CM 


<N 


CM 


CN 


CM 


CM 


CM 


w 

w 

B 
o 
































!>. 


00 


OS 


a> 


OS 


OO 


00 


OO 


0O 


OS 


o 


OS 


OS 


02 


•umunxej^ 


<N 


CM 


CM 




(M 


CM 


*cH 
CN 


CN 


-cH 
<M 


CN 


»o 

CN 


CN 


CM 


































H 




IC 


OO 


o 


C3J 


CO 


Hi 


»» 


CD 


** 


us 


■* 


US 


CO 






•uinuituij\[ 


i« 


lO 


CO 


in 


ira 


lO 


>o 


»o 


US 


US 


us 


US 


US 




H o 
































EC m 

pJ « 
H Eh 






























































a « 




o 


CO 


t^. 


CO 


lO 


■* 


■«CH 


U5 


US 


•>* 


~& 


us 


US 




o 


•oinuiixej^; 


«3 


CO 


CO 


co 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




WATER 

SHOP, 

TREET. 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 




•tanuiiuij^; 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


































& 8 M 




























































a M !z 
































MALD 
WOR 

GREE 




t^- 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t-- 


CO 




•uinuiix , Bj\[ 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 




























ix 
































H « „ 
h) ■< • 




1—1 


o 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CN 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 




•uinuiiaij\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


co 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 




J « 15 g 






























g pq < P 
































l> H J ^ 

S J W H 






























































OO 


t~- 


^- 


t~ 


tr- 


CD 


CD 


l-~ 


t^- 


^- 


00 


OS 


t-- 






•ulnuiix'Bpj 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


ee 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


> 

H 

O 


<u 
































H 






t-H 


CM 


1— I 






CM 


1— 1 


CM 




i— 1 


CM 


1—1 


MEDFORD 
CITY HALL 

NNEX, HIG 
STREET. 


•uinraiuij\[ 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CO 


co 




t^ 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


tr-- 


CD 


o 


CO 


1>- 


CO 


t^ 


CD 


CO 


•uinraix'Bj^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


co 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


t-] 


« 




































CO 


CM 


CM 


(M 


CM 


CO 


CO 


i CM 


(M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




P fi 


•umuntitj\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 




«2o 
































O Eh Sa- 
































fe 02 K 
































P fc H 




































CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


m 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 




•uinuiixej^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 




H 




OO 


CO 


t-» 


CO 


CO 


b- 


CO 


US 


00 


oo 


t^ 


CO 


t-~ 




LLSTON 
NE HOUS 
A.RVARD 
TREET. 


•iumuiuij\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


































































































CO 


O0 


t^ 


to 


>n 


CO 




t- 


CO 


us 


US 


CO 




< 3 K W 
to 


•uitiuiix'bj\[ 


^ 


r^ 


I-~ 


t^ 


t~ 


t- 


I-- 


t- 


t- 


t>- 


t~~ 


t^ 


!>. 
































_ 
































H 






-<* 


1-^ 


O 


*r> 


lO 


!>. 


OO 


t- 


b- 


t- 


CO 


CO 




Jw . 


•uinraratj\[ 


■"*! 


*# 


•* 


lO 


■* 


-* 


rJH 


*# 


^ 


x*< 


tH 


■V 


*# 




fc a P H 
































BOSTO 

ENGINE H 

BULFIN 

STREE 






























































































CO 


•* 


w 


f^ 


CO 


CO 


•* 


us 


us 


■«* 


US 


■* 


us 




•uinraix'Bj^ 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CD 


CD 


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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



197 





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198 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 4 



WATER WORKS STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1915. 

The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict which includes the following cities and towns: — 



City or Town. 



Population, 
Census of 1915. 



Estimated 
Population, 
July 1, 1915. 



Boston, 

Somerville, 

Maiden, 

Chelsea, 

Newton, 1 

Everett, 

Quincy, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Revere, 

Watertown 

Arlington, 

Milton, 

Winthrop, 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott, 

Lexington, 

Belmont, . 

Nahant, 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 
Saugus, 2 



745,439 

86,854 

48,907 

43,426 

43,113 

37,718 

40,674 

30,509 

16,880 

25,178 

16,515 

14,889 

8,600 

12,758 

7,489 

7,345 

5,538 

8,081 

1,387 



1,201,300 
280 



748,890 

87,320 

49,160 

43,750 

43,280 

37,950 

40,940 

30,820 

16,960 

25,500 

16,660 

15,050 

8,650 

12,900 

7,510 

7,390 

5,570 

8,180 

1,400 



1,207,880 
280 



1 No water supplied during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 
s Only a small portion of Saugus was supplied with water. 



Pumping. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1 : — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard 

Iron Works and E. P. Allis Company. 
Description of coal used: — Bituminous: Beaver Run. Anthracite: buckwheat. 

Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $4.14, buckwheat $3.08. Average 

price per gross ton $3.97. Per cent, ashes 12.3. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Beaver Run and Alpha Special. An- 
thracite : buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous $4.03, buckwheat 
$2.92. Average price per gross ton $3.80. Per cent, ashes 12.5. 

Spot Pond Pumping Station: — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company ^and 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used: — Bituminous: New River. Anthracite: screenings. 

Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $5.06, screenings $2.50. Average 

price per gross ton $4.38. Per cent, ashes 11.8. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



199 





Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 




No 


. 1. 


No. 2. 




Engine 


Engine 


Engine 




No. 1. 


No. 4. 


No. 12. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 


8,000,000 


30,000,000 


40,000,000 


Coal consumed for year (pounds) , 


904,430 


1,893,530 


5,788,640 


Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 


$4,843.86 


$11,918.66 


$20,112.04 


Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 


289.20 


2,898.99 


8,620.42 


Average dynamic head (feet), 


133.80 


119.38 


123.26 


Gallons Dumped per pound of coal, 


319.76 


1,531.00 


1,489.20 


Duty on basis of plunger displacement, .... 


36,750,000 


155,310,000 


156,000,000 


Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, .... 


$16.7492 


$4.1113 


$2.3331 


Cost per million gallons raised one foot, ..... 


.1252 


.0344 


.0189 







Chestnut Hill 

Pumping 
Station No. 2. 


Spot Pond 
Pumping 
Station. 




Engines Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 


Engines Nos. 8 
and 9. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons) , 

Coal consumed for year (pounds) 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million«gallons), 

Average dynamic head (feet), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, .... 
Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, .... 
Cost per million gallons raised one foot, .... 




105,000,000 

4,527,085 

$30,164.26 

12,922.06 

40.34 

2,854.39 

97,890,000 

$2.3343 

.0579 


30,000,000 

2,209,787 

$14,525.60 

2,473.99 

127.87 

1,119.56 

121,670,000 

$5.8713 

.0459 



Consumption. 

Estimated total population of the eighteen cities and towns 

supplied wholly or partially during the year 1915, 
Total consumption (gallons), pump basis, 
Average daily consumption (gallons), pump basis, . 
Gallons per day to each inhabitant, pump basis, . 



1,164,600 

36,639,340,000 

100,382,000 

86.2 



Distribution. 





Owned and 






operated by 


Total in District 




Metropolitan 


supplied 




Water 


by Metropolitan 




and Sewerage 


Water Works. 




Board. 




Kinds of pipe used, 


_i 


-i 


Sizes, ........ 












60-4 inch. 


60-4 inch. 


Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), 












3.19 


41.14 


Length in use (miles), .... 












122.24 


1,855.09 


Stop-gates added, ..... 












10 


- 


Stop-gates now in use, .... 












516 


- 


Service pipes added, .... 












- 


4,143 


Service pipes now in use, 












- 


176,236 


Meters added, 












- 


10,373 


Meters now in use, ..... 












- 


117,537 


Fire hydrants added, .... 












- 


485 


Fire hydrants now in use, 


' 


16,928 



1 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought-iron, cement-lined steel and kalamine pipe. 



200 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No . 5 . 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



10 



l. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



1101 



llli 



112i 



114i 



115i 



121i 



127 



128 



129 



130 



2. 

WORK. 



Part of Section 69, Station to 
Station 23 + 0, New Mystic 
sewer, North Metropolitan 
System in Winchester. 

Part of Section 69, Station 23 
+ to Station 49 + 69, New 
Mystic sewer, North Met- 
ropolitan System in Win- 
chester. 

Section 57A, Revere exten- 
sion, North Metropolitan 
System in Chelsea and 
Revere. 

425 tons of coal for Alewife 
Brook pumping station. 

6,900 tons of coal: — 
2,700 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Boston 

pumping station. 
1,200 tons for Charlestown 

pumping station. 

New screen-house at East Bos- 
ton pumping station. 

425 tons of coal for Alewife 
Brook pumping station. 

1,200 tons of coal for Charles- 
town pumping station. 

5,700 tons of coal: — 
2,700 tons of coal for Deer 

Island pumping station. 

3,000 tons of coal for East 

Boston pumping station. 

Cast-iron pipes and special 
castings for Section 1, Deer 
Island outfall extension, 
North Metropolitan System, 
Deer Island, Boston Harbor. 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



Amount op Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



$34,975 00 



61,365 75 



3,368 70 



$4.63 per 

ton. 
$4.51 per 

ton. 
$4.53 per 

ton. 

$7,867 00 



$4.58 per 

ton. 
$4.47 per 

ton. 

$18,150 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



$33,360 002 



53,616 002 



3,360 002 



$5.15 per 
ton. 2 



$3.98 per 

ton. 2 
$3.98 per 

ton. 2 
$4.24 per 

ton. 2 

$7,200 002 



$5.15 per 
ton. 2 

$4.53 per 
ton. 2 



$4.20 per 
ton. 2 

$4.20 per 
ton. 2 

$16,735 00 2 



Contractor. 



The Henry Spinach 
Contracting Co., 
Waterbury, Conn. 



The Henry Spinach 
Contracting Co., 
Waterbury, Conn. 



G. M. Bryne Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Locke Coal Company, 
Maiden. 



Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Boston. 



J. Caddigan Company, 
Boston. 

Locke Coal Company, 
Maiden. 

Metropolitan Coal 
Company, Boston. 



New England Coal & 
Coke Company, Bos- 
ton. 



United States Cast 
Iron Pipe and Foun- 
dry Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 



i Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



201 



Appendix No . 5 . 



the Year 1915 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 




Date of Con- 
tract. 


Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 


Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1915. 


Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1915. 




Jan. 2, 1914 


Nov. 7, 1914 


- 


$37,853 18 


1 


Jan. 2, 1914 


Dec. 19, 1914 


- 


55,638 45 


2 


May 12, 1914 


July 10, 1914 


- 


3,163 63 


3 


June 26, 1914 


July 1, 1915 


- 


1,641 99 


4 


June 26, 1914 


July 1, 1915 


• 


25,477 91 


5 


Oct. 1, 1914 


Mar. 12, 1915 


- $ 


7,224 37 


6 


June 10, 1915 


- 


$5.15 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at Ale- 
wife Brook pumping station. 


716 52 


7 


June 10, 1915 


- 


$4.53 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 
Charlestown pumping station. 


1,313 70 


8 


June 11, 1915 




$4.20 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at Deer 

Island pumping station. 
$4.20 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at East 

Boston pumping station. 


7,579 10 


9 


Aug. 27, 1915 




For 84-inch straight pipe, $37.50 per ton of 2,000 
pounds; for special castings, $74 per ton of 2,000 
pounds. 




10 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



202 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CONTKACTS MADE AND PENDING DURING 

Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Number 


2. 


3. 

Num- 


Amount 


op Bid. 


6. 




4. 


5. 






of 


WORK. 


ber of 


Next to 


Lowest. 


Contractor. 




Contract. 




Bids. 


Lowest. 




11 


131 


Section 1A Deer Island outfall 
extension, temporary out- 
fall sewer, North Metropoli- 
tan System, Deer Island, 
Boston Harbor. 


5 


$44,358 75 


$43,370 002 


George M. Bryne, Bos- 
ton. 


12 


132 


Section 19, Reconstruction in 
new location of Maiden 
River siphon, North Met- 
ropolitan System in Everett 
and Medford. 


4 


29,110 00 


26,000 002 


George M. Bryne, Bos- 
ton. 



Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 

WORK. 

• 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 


1161 


2,650 tons of coal: — 
2,200 tons for Ward Street 

pumping station. 
450 tons for Nut Island 
screen-house. 


2 

2 


$5.15 per 

ton. 
$4.79 per 

ton. 


$4.85 per 
ton. 2 

$4.35 per 
ton. 2 


Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Boston. 


2 


1171 


450 tons of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 


2 


$4.98 per 
ton. 


$4.80 per 
ton. 2 


Frost Coal Company, 
Boston. 


3 


120 


Section 43, Relief outfall, 
High-level sewer, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Quincy. 


8 


$36,310 00 


$34,790 00 2 


W. H. Ellis & Son Co., 
East Boston. 


4 


1221 


Section 70, Siphon crossing, 
High-level sewer, South 
Metropolitan System in 
West Roxbury. 


4 


5,250 00 


4,500 002 


Charles A. Haskin, 
Charlestown. 


5 


123 


Section 106, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham and Wellesley. 


7 


37,651 00 


27,912 502 


Hugh Nawn Contract- 
ing Company, Bos- 
ton. 



1 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



203 



the Year 1915 — Sewerage Works — Continued. 
North Metropolitan Sijstem — Concluded. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1915. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 81, 

1915. 



Oct. 11, 1915 



Nov. 16, 1915 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 78-inch 
concrete outfall sewer, $18 per lin. ft.; for earth ex- 
cavation, laying and refilling in trench for GO-inch 
cast-iron outfall pipes, $40 per lin. ft.; for Portland 
cement brick masonry in manholes and special 
structures, $20 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement 
concrete masonry in trench and special structures, 
$8 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench, Everett 
side, for 66-inch and 48-inch masonry sewers, $18 
per lin. ft.; for earth excavation and refilling in 
trench, Medford side, for 48-inch masonry sewer, 
$14 per lin. ft.; for earth excavation and refilling in 
air tunnel and shaft for 48-inch masonry sewer, $45 
per lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick masonry in 
trench, manholes and special structures, $16 per 
cu. yd. ; for Portland cement brick masonry in tun- 
nel and shaft, $16 per cu. yd. ; for Portland cement 
concrete masonry in trench, manholes and special 
structures, $9 per cu. yd. ; for Portland cement con- 
crete masonry in tunnel and shaft, $9 per cu. yd.; 
for spruce piles in place in trench, $0.40 per lin. ft. ; 
for spruce piles in place in air tunnel, $0.40 per lin. 
ft. 



$2,354 50 



11 



12 



South Metropolitan System. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



June 26, 1914 

June 26, 1914 

Aug. 29, 1914 

Nov. 21, 1914 

July 29, 1915 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



S. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1915. 



July 1, 1915 

July 1, 1915 

Dec. 1, 1915 

Jan. 11, 1915 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench and em- 
bankment for 24-in. by 27-in. concrete sewer, $2.75 
per lin. ft.; for earth or rock excavation in tunnel 
for 24-in. by 27-in. concrete sewer, SO per lin. ft.; for 
Portland cement brick masonry in manholes and 
special structures, $18 per cu. yd.; for Portland 
cement concrete masonry in trench and special 
structures, $7.50 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement 
concrete masonry in tunnel, $10 per cu. yd. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1915. 



$13,743 65 

1,734 67 
29,783 16 

4,500 00 

14,994 21 



2 Contract based unon this bid. 



204 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



11 



1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



124 



125 



126 



127 



133 



134 



2. 

WORK. 



Section 105, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham. 



450 tons of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 

2,300 tons of coal for Ward 
Street pumping station. 

550 tons of coal for Nut Island 
screen-house. 

Section 104, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham. 



Section 103, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



12 



Amount op Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



$37,272 50 



5.20 per 
ton. 

5.05 per 
ton. 



$64,272 50 



35,312 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



$29,655 00 2 



$4.99 per 
ton. 2 

$4.93 per 
ton. 2 

$4.75 per 
ton. 2 

$59,055 002 



34,011002 



6. 

Contractor. 



Hugh Nawn Contract- 
ing Company, Bos- 
ton. 



Frost Coal Company, 
Boston. 

Staples Coal Company, 
Boston. 

Metropolitan Coal 
Company, Boston. 

Bay State Dredging 
and Contracting 
Company, Boston. 



Bruno and Petitti, 
Boston. 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



205 



the Year 1915 — Sewerage Works — Concluded. 
South Metropolitan System — Concluded. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1915. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1915. 



July 29, 1915 



June 9, 1915 

June 9, 1915 

June 10, 1915 

Dec. 22, 1915 



Dec. 22, 1915 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench and em- 
bankment for 24-in. by 27-in. concrete sewer, $3 per 
lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick masonry in man- 
holes and special structures, $18 per cu. yd.; for 
Portland cement concrete masonry in trench and 
special structures, $7.50 per cu. yd. ; for rock excava- 
tion in trench, $3 per cu. yd. 

$4.99 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 
Quincy pumping station. 

$4.93 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 
Ward Street pumping station. 

$4.75 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on wharf at Hut 
Island screen-house. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench and em- 
bankment for 24-in. by 27-in. and 27-in. by 36-in. 
concrete sewer, $4.25 per lin. ft.; for earth or rock 
excavation or both and refilling in tunnel for 27-in. 
by 36-in. concrete sewer, $10.25 per lin. ft.; for 
Portland cement brick masonry in manholes and 
special structures, $16 per cu. yd.; for Portland 
cement concrete masonry in trench and special 
structures, $8.50 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement 
concrete masonry in tunnel, $10.60 per cu. yd.; for 
rock excavation in trench, $5.50 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench and em- 
bankment for 24-in. by 27-in. concrete sewer, $2.25 
per lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick masonry in 
manholes and special structures, $15 per cu. yd.; 
for Portland cement concrete masonry in trench 
and special structure?, $7.50 per cu. yd.; for rock 
excavation in trench, $3 per cu. j'd. 



J.474 71 



345 72 
3,510 96 
1,083 00 



10 



11 



206 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1915 — Sewerage Works 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1915. 



North Metropolitan System, 12 contracts 

South Metropolitan System, 11 contracts, 

Total of 23 contracts made and pending during the year 1915, 



$142,963 35 
99,170 08 



$242,133 43 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 207 



Appendix No . 6 . 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL COURT 

ON JANUARY 17, 1916. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board respectfully presents 
the following abstract of the account of its receipts, expenditures, dis- 
bursements, assets and liabilities for the year ending November 30, 1915, 
together with recommendations for legislation which it deems desirable, 
in accordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 
1906. 

Metropolitan Water Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan 
Water acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the ex- 
penditures for the construction and acquisition of works, and the 
balance available on December 1, 1915, have been as follows: — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, . . . $42,798,000 00 
Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropolitan 

Water District, paid into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320), . 90,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property which are placed to the 
credit of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund : — 
For the year ending November 30,' 1915, . $1,792 16 
For the period prior to December 1, 1914, . 242,911 42 

244,703 38 



Amount approved for payment by the Board out of the 
Metropolitan Water Loan Fund: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1915, . $409,598 46 
For the period prior to December 1, 1914, 42,386,391 43 



$43,132,703 38 



42,795,989 89 
Balance December 1, 1915, • . . . $336,713 49 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $42,536,000, bonds to the amount of 
$490,000 having been issued during the year. Of the amount issued, 
$41,398,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting 
to $1,138,000, were issued as serial bonds. 



208 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$42,494,000, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $42,000 had been paid. During the fiscal year $17,000 
in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund amounted on Decem- 
ber 1, 1915, to $12,491,245.25, an increase during the year of 
$957,791.80. 

The net debt on December 1, 1915, was $30,002,754.75, a decrease 
during the fiscal year of $484,791.80. 

Maintenance. 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and oper- 
ation of works, for the year ending November 30, 
1915, $460,835 00 

Special appropriation (chapter 369, Acts of 1915), . 115 00 

Special appropriation for protection of water supply 
in aqueducts (1911) remaining, .... 9,930 60 

Special appropriations for protection and improve- 
ment of the water supply (1912 and 1913) re- 
maining, 35,143 37 

Receipts credited to this fund for the year ending 

November 30, 1915, 43,326 13 

$549,350 10 

Amount approved by Board for maintenance and operation of 
works during year ending November 30, 1915, . . . . 436,129 64 

Balance December 1, 1915, $113,220 46 

This balance includes the sum of $9,930.60, the amount remain- 
ing unexpended of the special appropriation for the protection of the 
water supply in aqueducts, and the sums of $2,713.93, the amount 
remaining unexpended of the special appropriation in 1912, and 
$1,874.38, of the special appropriation in 1913 for the protection and 
improvement of the water supply. 

The Board has also received during the year ending November 
30, 1915, $43,326.13 from rentals, the sale of land, land products 
and power and from other proceeds from the operations of the 
Board, which, according to section 18 of the Metropolitan Water 
Act, are applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the pay- 
ment of interest on the Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking fund 
requirements, and expenses of maintenance and operation of works, 
in reduction of the amount to be assessed upon the Metropolitan 
Water District for the year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 209 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging 
to the District and to water companies, and from municipalities for 
admission to the District, have been applied as follows : — 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities 
and towns of the District, as provided by section 3 of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Act, $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to December 
1, 1914, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 
as provided by chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, .... 51,569 11 

For the year beginning December 1, 1914, and ending November 
30, 1915, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 
as provided by said last-named act, . . . . . 14,075 77 

$285,510 53 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for 
the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the receipts 
which are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the expenditures 
for construction, are given below, as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for con- 
struction under the various acts, including 
those for the Revere, Belmont and Maiden 
extensions, North System enlargements and 
extensions, New Mystic sewer, Deer Island 
outfall extension, lowering sewer siphon 
under Maiden River and balance of appro- 
priation under chapter 215, Acts of 1915, . $7,227,365 73 
Receipts from sales of real estate and from 
miscellaneous sources, which are placed to 
the credit of the North Metropolitan 
System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1915, 153 27 

For the period prior to December 1, 1914, 85,363 52 

Amount approved for payment by the Board l 
out of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 
Fund, North System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1915, $37,249 63 

For the period prior to December 1, 1914, 7,084,383 48 

$7,312,882 52 $7,121,633 11 
Balance December 1, 1915, $191,249 41 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and its successor, the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



210 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Loans authorized for expenditures for con- 
struction under the various acts, applied to 
the construction of the Charles River valley 
sewer, Neponset valley sewer, High-level 
sewer and extensions (including Wellesley 
branch), and an additional appropriation 
authorized by chapter 210, Acts of 1915, . $9,222,046 27 
Receipts for pumping, sales of real estate and 
from miscellaneous sources, which are 
placed to the credit of the South Metro- 
politan System: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1915, . 4,972 24 

For the period prior to December 1, 1914, 14,092 01 

Amount approved by the Board for payment 
as follows: — 
On account of the Charles River valley 

sewer, • . $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level sewer and 
extensions : — 
For the year ending November 30, 

1915, ....... . 72,447 38 

For the period prior to December 1, 

1914, . ... . • . 7,139,151 99 

$9,241,110 52 $8,923,177 10 

Balance December 1, 1915, . . ... . . $317,933 42 

•The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan bonds issued at 
the end of the fiscal year was $16,011,412, bonds to the amount of 
$130,500 having been issued during the year. Of the amount issued, 
$15,440,912 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting 
to $570,500, were serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$15,982,412, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $13,000 had been paid during the year, $29,000 having 
been paid to December 1, 1915. 

Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, $7,104,500 
were issued for the North Metropolitan System and $8,877,912 for 
the South Metropolitan System. The Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 
Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 1915, to $3,290,979.46, of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 211 

which $2,095,509.86 was on - account of the North Metropolitan 
System and $1,195,469.60 was on account of the South Metropolitan 
System, an increase during the year of $279,467.02. 

The net debt on December 1, 1915, was $12,691,432.54, a decrease 
of $161,967.02. 

Included in the above figures for the North Metropolitan System 
is $570,500 in serial bonds issued under chapter 512 of the Acts of 
1911, of which $29,000 has been paid. 

Maintenance. 
North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1915, . . . $186,000 00 
Portion of appropriation under chapter 775, Acts of 1914, . ' . 10,569 06 

$196,569 06 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, which are returned 
to the appropriation: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1915, 568 97 

$197,138 03 
Amount approved for payment by the Board: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1915, . . . . . 179,177 60 

Balance December 1, 1915, $17,960 43 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1915, . . . $117,855 00 
Receipts from sales of property and for pumping, which are re- 
turned to the appropriation: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1915, 145 28 

$118,000 28 
Amount approved for payment by the Board: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1915, 108,060 86 

Balance December 1, 1915, $9,939 42 



212 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 7. 



LEGISLATION OF THE YEAR 1915 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



1909, 514, § 112, 
etc., amended. 



Weekly pay- 
ment of 
wages, etc. 



General Acts, 1915. 

Chapter 75. 

An Act relative to the weekly payment of wages. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section one hundred and twelve of chapter 
five hundred and fourteen of the acts of the year nineteen 
hundred and nine, as amended by chapter three hundred 
and fifty of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and ten, 
by chapter two hundred and eight of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and eleven, by chapter seven hundred and 
eighty-four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
thirteen, and by chapter two hundred and forty-seven of 
the acts of the year nineteen hundred and fourteen, is 
hereby further amended by striking out the words "or any 
of the building trades", in the fifth line, and inserting in 
place thereof the words : — or in the erection, alteration, 
repair or removal of any building or structure, — so as to 
read as follows: — Section 112. Every person, firm or 
corporation engaged in carrying on a factory, workshop, 
manufacturing, mechanical or mercantile establishment, 
mine, quarry, railroad or street railway, or a telephone, 
telegraph, express or water company, or in the erection, 
alteration, repair or removal of any building or structure, 
or the construction or repair of any railroad, street railway, 
road, bridge, sewer, gas, water or electric light works, pipes 
or lines, shall pay weekly each employee engaged in his or 
its business the wages earned by him to within six days 
of the date of said payment, but any employee leaving his 
or her employment, shall be paid in full on the following 
regular pay day; and any employee discharged from such 
employment shall be paid in full on the day of his discharge, 
or in the city of Boston as soon as the provisions of law 
requiring pay rolls, bills and accounts to be certified shall 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 213 

have been complied with; and the commonwealth, its 
officers, boards and commissions shall so pay every me- 
chanic, workman and laborer who is employed by it or 
them, and every person employed by it or them in any 
penal or charitable institution, and every county and city 
shall so pay every employee who is engaged in its business 
the wages or salary earned by him, unless such mechanic, 
workman, laborer or employee requests in writing to be paid 
in a different manner; and every town shall so pay each 
employee in its business if so required by him; but an 
employee who is absent from his regular place of labor at 
a time fixed for payment shall be paid thereafter on de- 
mand. The provisions of this section shall not apply to an Exemptions, 
employee of a co-operative corporation or association if he 
is a stockholder therein unless he requests such corporation 
to pay him weekly. The public service commission, after 
a hearing, may exempt any railroad corporation from pay- 
ing weekly any of its employees if it appears to the board 
that such employees prefer less frequent payments, and that 
their interests and the interests of the public will not suffer 
thereby. No corporation, contractor, person or partnership 
shall by a special contract with an employee or by any 
other means exempt himself or itself from the provisions of 
this and the following section. Whoever violates the pro- Penalty, 
visions of this section shall be punished by a fine of not 
less than ten nor more than fifty dollars. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 17, 1915. 



Chapter 95. 

An Act relative to the retirement of certain vet- 
erans IN THE SERVICE OF THE COMMONWEALTH. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section one of chapter four hundred and fifty-eight of ^'^ § ** 
the acts of the year nineteen hundred and seven is hereby 
amended by inserting after the word "war", in the tenth 
line, the words: — after five years, — and by striking out 
the words "at any time", in the twelfth and thirteenth lines, 
so as to read as follows : — Section 1 . A veteran of the Retirement of 
civil war in the service of the commonwealth, if incapaci- e?ans in serv- 
tated for active duty, shall be retired from active service, common- 
with the consent of the governor, at one half the rate of x 



214 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Proviso. 



1899, 424, § 8, 
amended. 



Proviso. 



compensation paid to him when in active service, to be paid 
out of the treasury of the commonwealth: provided, that no 
veteran shall be entitled to be retired under the provisions 
of this act unless he shall have been in the service of the 
commonwealth at least ten years. But if, in the opinion of 
the governor and council, any veteran of the civil war, after 
five years, in said service is incapacitated to such a degree 
as to render his retirement necessary for the good of the 
service, he may so be retired. A veteran retired under the 
provisions of this act, whose term of service was for a fixed 
number of years, shall be entitled to the benefits of the 
act without reappointment. [Approved March 23, 1915. 



Chapter 147. 



An Act to provide for additional regulation rela- 
tive to the introduction of sewage into the 
south metropolitan sewerage system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section eight of chapter four hundred and 
twenty-four of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-nine is hereby amended by striking out the word 
"and" where it first occurs, in the fifth line, and inserting 
after the word "control", in the same line, the words:' — and 
regulation, — so as to -read as follows : — Section 8. Any 
city or town, within the limits of which any main sewer 
shall have been constructed under the provisions of this 
act, shall connect its local sewers with such main sewer, 
except as hereinafter provided, subject to the direction, 
control and regulation of said board, and any person, firm 
or corporation may, subject to the direction, control and 
regulation, from time to time, of said board, and subject 
to such terms, conditions and regulations as each city or 
town may prescribe, connect private drains with such main 
sewer: provided, that the said board shall, without expense 
to the city of Quincy, make all connections and take and 
construct such intercepting sewers as may be necessary to 
enable the city of Quincy to drain by gravity its territory 
into said metropolitan sewer. The present pumping station 
and force mains of the city of Quincy shall be taken and 
paid for by said board of metropolitan sewerage commis- 
sioners, and said board shall build and operate such new 
force main or mains and pumping stations as may be neces- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 215 

sary to enable the city of Quincy to drain its sewerage sys- 
tems into said metropolitan sewer. The sewerage systems 
of all drainage areas not now drained by the south metro- 
politan system, which are constructed after the passage of 
this act, shall be constructed in accordance with the so- 
called separate system of sewerage. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 8, 1915. 



Chapter 150. 

An Act to provide for additional regulation rela- 
tive TO THE INTRODUCTION OF SEWAGE INTO THE 
NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section nine of chapter four hundred and amended § 9 ' 
thirty-nine of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
eighty-nine is hereby amended by striking out the word 
"and", in the fourth line, and inserting after the word 
"control", in the same line, the words: — and regulation, 
— so as to read as follows: — Section 9. Any city or town 
within whose limits any main sewer shall have been con- 
structed under the provisions of this act shall connect its 
local sewers with such main sewer, subject to the direction, 
control and regulation of said board, and any person, firm 
or corporation may, subject to the direction, control and 
regulation from time to time of said board, and subject to 
such terms, conditions and regulations as each city or 
town may prescribe, connect private drains with said main 
sewer. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 8, 1915. 



Chapter 210. 

An Act to provide for an additional outlet for the 

south metropolitan sewer. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. For the purpose of meeting the expenses in- Additional 
curred by the metropolitan water and sewerage board in souta metro- 
providing an additional outlet for the south metropolitan poitansewer - 
sewer at Nut Island, Quincy, as authorized by chapter 
four hundred and twenty -four of the acts of the year eigh- 



216 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Metropolitan 
Sewerage Loan. 



Certain pro- 
visions of law 
to apply. 



Certain condi- 
tions to be 
accepted by 
the common- 
wealth rela- 
tive to the im- 
provement of 
Maiden river. 



Metropolitan 

Sewerage 

Loan. 



teen hundred and ninety-nine, the treasurer and receiver 
general shall issue from time to time, in the name and 
behalf of the commonwealth and under its seal, bonds 
designated on the face thereof, Metropolitan Sewerage 
Loan, to an amount not exceeding five thousand dollars, 
in addition to the amount of such bonds heretofore author- 
ized for the construction of the south metropolitan sewerage 
works. 

Section 2. The provisions of chapter four hundred and 
twenty-four of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-nine and of all acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto shall, so far as they may be applicable, 
apply to the indebtedness authorized by this act and to all 
proceedings hereunder. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 28, 1915. 



Chapter 215. 

An Act accepting certain conditions relative to the 
improvement of malden river. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The conditions set forth in the act of con- 
gress, known as the River and Harbor bill, approved July 
twenty-fifth, nineteen hundred and twelve, and in acts in 
addition thereto and in amendment thereof, which require 
that the sum appropriated, or to be made available, by 
congress by said acts, for completing the improvement in 
Maiden river in this commonwealth, shall not be expended 
until the commonwealth has lowered the siphon of the 
metropolitan sewer which now crosses said river, and shall 
have pledged itself for all cost of maintenance of the new 
depth of the channel, are hereby accepted; and the metro- 
politan water and sewerage board is hereby authorized and 
directed to lower the said siphon and to do any other act 
or thing necessary to comply with the requirements of the 
said acts, and may expend for this purpose a sum not ex- 
ceeding seventy thousand dollars. 

Section 2. To meet the expenses incurred under the 
provisions of this act the treasurer and receiver general 
shall issue from time to time in the name and behalf of the 
commonwealth and under its seal, bonds designated on the 
face thereof, Metropolitan Sewerage Loan, to an amount 
not exceeding seventy thousand dollars, in addition to the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 217 

amount of such bonds heretofore authorized for the con- 
struction of the north metropolitan sewerage works. 

Section 3. The provisions of chapter four hundred and v5ion?on°aw 
thirty -nine of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and toa PP ! y- 
eighty-nine and of all acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto shall, so far as they may be applicable, 
apply to the indebtedness authorized by this act and to all 
proceedings hereunder. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 29, 1915. 



Chapter 244. 

An Act to fix kesponsibility for the payment of 
workmen's compensation by the commonwealth 
and by counties, cities, towns and districts. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Every board, commission and department of ^J!}*^ ro _ 
the commonwealth employing laborers, workmen and me- ^k^en's 
chanics, the Boston transit commission, and every county, compensation 
city, town and district which has accepted the provisions 
of chapter eight hundred and seven of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and thirteen shall, through its executive 
officer or board, designate a person to act as its agent in 
furnishing the benefits due under chapter seven hundred 
and fifty-one of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
eleven and acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto. Such agent shall be held responsible for the proper 
carrying out of this act under the direction and supervision 
of the industrial accident board until his agencv is revoked 
and a new agent designated. The name and address of 
every such agent shall be filed with the industrial accident 
board immediately upon his designation; and each of the 
foregoing boards, commissions, departments, counties, cities, 
towns and districts shall designate such an agent within 
thirty days after this act takes effect. 

Section 2. This act shall not apply to counties, cities, Not to apply 

to OGrt*nn 

towns and districts which are insured under the provisions counties, cities, 
of chapter seven hundred and fifty-one of the acts of the 
year nineteen hundred and eleven and acts in amendment 
thereof. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect on the first day of T (j^ oftaking 
June, in the year nineteen hundred and fifteen. [Approved 
May 10, 1915. 



218 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



1911, 624, § 1, 
amended. 



Removals, 
suspensions 
and transfers 
in civil service. 



Action of 
officer or 
board, etc., 
may be re- 
viewed by 
court. 



Decision to be 
final. 



Chapter 251. 

An Act relative to removals, suspensions and trans- 
fers IN THE CIVIL SERVICE. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section one of chapter six hundred and twenty-four of 
the acts of the year nineteen hundred and eleven is hereby 
amended by striking out the word "ten", in the fourteenth 
line, and inserting in place thereof the word : — thirty, — 
and by striking out the word "the", in the twenty-second 
line, and inserting in place thereof the word : — any, — so 
as to read as follows : — Section 1 . Every person now hold- 
ing or hereafter appointed to an office classified under the 
civil service rules of the commonwealth, except members of 
the police department of the city of Boston, of the police 
department of the metropolitan park commission, and 
except members of the district police, whether appointed 
for a definite or stated term, or otherwise, who is removed 
therefrom, lowered in rank or compensation, or suspended, 
or, without his consent, transferred from such office or em- 
ployment to any other, may, after a public hearing, as 
provided for by section two of chapter three hundred and 
fourteen of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and four, 
as amended by chapter two hundred and forty-three of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred and five, and within 
thirty days after such hearing, bring a petition in the 
police, district or municipal court within the judicial district 
where such person resides, addressed to the justice of the 
court and praying that the action of the officer or board in 
removing, suspending, lowering or transferring him may be 
reviewed by the court, and after such notice to such officer 
or board as the court may think necessary, it shall review 
the action of said officer or board, and hear any witnesses, 
and shall affirm said order unless it shall appear that said 
order was made by said officer or board without proper 
cause or in bad faith, in which case said order shall be 
reversed and the petitioner be reinstated in his office. The 
decision of the justice of said police, district or municipal 
court shall be final and conclusive upon the parties. [Ap- 
proved May 11, 1915. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 219 

Special Acts, 1915. 

Chapter 156. 

An Act making an appropriation for maintaining 
. and operating the south metropolitan sewer- 
age system. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred seventeen South metro- 
thousand eight hundred and fifty-five dollars is hereby sewerage 
appropriated, to be paid out of the South Metropolitan tenance, 
Sewerage System Maintenance Fund, for the cost of main- 
tenance and operation of the south metropolitan sewerage 
system, comprising a part of Boston, the cities of Newton 
and Waltham, and towns of Brookline, Water town, Ded- 
ham and Milton, during the fiscal year ending on the 
thirtieth day of November, nineteen hundred and fifteen. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 10, 1915. 



Chapter 157. 

An Act making an appropriation for maintaining 
and operating the north metropolitan sewer- 
age system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred eighty- North metro- 
politan sewer- 
five thousand five hundred dollars is hereby appropriated, age system, 

. maintenance. 

to be paid out of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Maintenance Fund, for the maintenance and operation of 
a system of sewage disposal for the cities included in what 
is known as the north metropolitan sewerage system, dur- 
ing the fiscal year ending on the thirtieth day of November, 
nineteen hundred and fifteen. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 10, 1915. 



Chapter 159. 

An Act making an appropriation for maintaining 

and operating the metropolitan water system. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding four hundred sixty Metropolitan 
thousand seven hundred and twenty dollars is hereby ap- maintenance.' 



220 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



propriated, to be paid out of the Metropolitan Water 
Maintenance Fund, for the maintenance and operation of 
the metropolitan water system for the cities and towns in 
what is known as the metropolitan water district, during 
the fiscal year ending on the thirtieth day of November, 
nineteen hundred and fifteen. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 10, 1915. 



Appropria- 
tions. 



Chapter 369. 

An Act in further addition to the acts making ap- 
propriations FOR SUNDRY MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES 
AUTHORIZED DURING THE PRESENT YEAR AND FOR 
CERTAIN OTHER EXPENSES AUTHORIZED BY LAW. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The sums hereinafter mentioned are appro- 
priated, to be paid out of the treasury of the commonwealth 
from the ordinary revenue, unless otherwise specified, to 
wit: — 



Thomas M. 
McGee. 



For Thomas M. McGee, in compensation for injuries to 
his minor son, Paul R. McGee, caused by an automobile 
operated by an employee of the metropolitan water and 
sewerage board, the sum of one hundred and fifteen dollars, 
to be paid from the Metropolitan Water Maintenance 
Fund. 



Dependents 
of James 
McGovern. 



Improvements 
in north met- 
ropolitan sew- 
erage system. 



To be expended by the metropolitan water and sewerage 
board for the benefit of the dependents of James McGov- 
ern, as authorized by chapter one hundred and one of the 
resolves of the present year, the sum of five hundred 
dollars, to be paid from the Metropolitan Sewerage Main- 
tenance Fund, North System. 



Chapter 76. 

Resolve providing for improvements in the north 

metropolitan sewerage system. 

Resolved, That the metropolitan water and sewerage 

board is hereby authorized to use the balance remaining of 

the amount appropriated for repairing the damage done 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 221 

by a recent explosion at the metropolitan sewerage pumping 
station in East Boston for the extension of existing works 
in the north metropolitan sewerage system and the con- 
struction of such new works as the board may deem neces- 
sary for the said north system. [Approved April 28, 1915. 



Chapter 101. 

Resolve in favor of the family of the late james 
mcgovern of boston. 

Resolved, That the metropolitan water and sewerage Family of 
board is hereby authorized to pay to the dependents of the McGovem. 
late James McGovern of Boston the sum of five hundred 
dollars, in compensation for injuries sustained by him by an 
explosion which occurred at the East Boston pumping sta- 
tion on June first, in the year nineteen hundred and four- 
teen, and from the effects of which he has since died. The 
payments shall be made from the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage Fund. Chapter one hundred and fifty-four of 
the resolves of the year nineteen hundred and fourteen is 
hereby repealed. [Approved May 17, 1915. 



Chapter 128. 

Resolve providing for the payment by the common- 
wealth OF A SUM OF MONEY TO JOSEPH HANREDDY. 

Resolved, That the metropolitan water and sewerage Payment by 
board be authorized and directed to make such settlement wealth of sum 
of the claim of Joseph Hanreddy for compensation for Joseph Han- 
money spent and expenses incurred by him in connection 
with various suits brought against him in the performance 
of a contract for constructing a pressure tunnel and laying 
a pipe line in section seven of the Weston aqueduct supply 
mains in the city of Newton, as appears to them just and 
equitable, at an expense not exceeding ten thousand dollars, 
to be paid from the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund, and 
the treasurer and receiver general is hereby authorized to 
borrow upon the credit of the commonwealth, under the 
provisions of the general or special laws relative to the 
loans for metropolitan water construction, such sums, not 
exceeding ten thousand dollars, as the metropolitan water 
and sewerage board deem necessary. [Approved May 27, 
1915. 



222 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Investigation 
as to hours of 



Chapter 137. 

Resolve providing foe an investigation relative to 
the hours of labor of public employees and 
relative to saturday half-holidays for laborers, 
workmen and mechanics employed by or on be- 
half of the commonwealth. 

Resolved, That the subject-matter contained in the bill 



labor of public relative to the hours of labor of public employees, printed 

employees, r r " ' * 

Saturday half- as House Document No. 397, and in the bill relative to 

holidays, etc. ' 

Saturday half-holidays for laborers, workmen and me- 
chanics employed by or on behalf of the commonwealth, 
printed as House Document No. 2140, both of the current 
year, be referred to the commission on economy and effi- 
ciency for investigation. Said commission shall report the 
results of its investigation, together with such recommenda- 
tions as it may deem advisable, to the next general court 
on or before the second Wednesday in January. [Ap- 
proved May 28, 1915. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



223 



INDEX TO LEGISLATION OF THE YEAE 1915 AFFECTING THE 
METKOPOLITAN WATEE AND SEWEEAGE BOAED. 



A. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

for compensating Thomas M. McGee for injury to son, . 

for compensating dependents of James McGovern, 

for lowering siphon under Maiden River, 

for maintenance of Metropolitan Water System, . 

for maintenance of North Metropolitan Sewerage System, 

for maintenance of South Metropolitan Sewerage System, 

to provide additional outlet for South Metropolitan System, 



Chap. Sect. 





S. 369 


1 




S. 369 


1 




G. 215 


2 




S. 159 


1 


. 


S. 157 


1 




S. 156 


1 




. G. 210 


1 



c. 

CIVIL SERVICE. 

relative to removals, suspensions and transfers in, 



G. 251 



E. 
EMPLOYEES, CERTAIN PUBLIC. 

investigation relative to hours of labor and Saturday half-holidays 

for, authorized, . . . . . . . . . Res. 137 



H. 
HANREDDY, JOSEPH. 

payment to, authorized for certain claims, 



Res. 128 



M. 
MALDEN RIVER. 

acceptance of certain conditions relative to improving, . 
McGEE, THOMAS M. 

payment to, authorized for injury to son, . 
McGOVERN, JAMES. 

payment to dependents of, authorized, and appropriation for, 

METROPOLITAN WATER SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of , . 



G. 215 


1 


S. 369 


1 


Res. 101 


_ 


S. 369 


1 


S. 159 


1 



N. 
NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

additional regulation relative to introduction of sewage into, . . G. 150 

appropriation for maintenance of, ...... S. 157 

transfer of certain maintenance funds to construction funds au- 
thorized, .......... Res. 76 



224 METROPOLITAN WATER BOARD. [P. D. No. 57. 



Chap. Sect. 
SEWAGE. 

additional regulation relative to introduction of, into North Metro- 
politan System, . . . . .■ . . G. 150 1 

additional regulation relative to introduction of, into South Metro- 
politan System, . . . . . . . . G. 147 1 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

additional outlet for, authorized, ..... 

additional regulation relative to introduction of sewage into, . 
appropriation for maintenance of, s 



V. 
VETERANS. 

relative to retirement of certain, on half pay, . . . G. 95 1 

W. 
WAGES. 

weekly payment of, to public employees, relative to, . . . G. 75 1 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT. 

appointment of agent to furnish benefits under, . . . . G. 244 1 



G. 


210 


1 


G. 


147 


1 


S. 


156 


1